Special Issue "Exercise Training and Supplements for Improving Function in Muscular Dystrophy"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Alan Hayes

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ageing; body composition; diabetes and obesity; dietary supplementation; exercise metabolism; exercise training; muscle contraction; muscle mass and function; muscular dystrophy; muscle wasting; sarcopenia; vitamin D; whey protein
Guest Editor
Dr. Emma Rybalka

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 61 3 8395 8226
Interests: chemotherapy; dietary supplementation; Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy; glucose metabolism; metabolic therapy; metabolism; mitochondria; mitochondrial therapy; muscle atrophy and wasting; muscle physiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skeletal muscular system is required for effective movement, strength and whole body glucose disposal. As such, it is vital for health and longevity. Muscular dystrophy is a generic term describing heritable conditions resulting in the progressive weakness and atrophy of muscle. The most severe is Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by a lack of dystrophin, encoded by one of the largest genes in the human body. Genetic cures of diseases, such as DMD, are the obvious approach. However the size of the gene has meant that despite more than 20 years of trying, as well as the sheer number of possible mutations, adjuvant therapies are still required.

Exercise has become a mainstream treatment option for many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure and depression. However, since exercise uses the very muscles that are damaged and wasting in muscular dystrophy, there are still question marks as to whether exercise is beneficial in muscular dystrophy. Similarly, a number of supplements have proven to be of benefit to skeletal muscles, either augmenting the effects of exercise training, or directly improving the size and strength of muscles. However, again, due to the complex nature of muscular dystrophy, whether exercise- and supplement-induced adaptations at the skeletal muscle level afford the same benefits in muscular dystrophy is still controversial or remains untested.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight the effects of exercise and supplements on muscular dystrophy, with a particular focus on DMD.

Prof. Alan Hayes
Dr. Emma Rybalka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • muscular dystrophy
  • DMD
  • skeletal muscle
  • exercise
  • supplement
  • muscle wasting
  • hypertrophy
  • mitochondria
  • muscle contraction
  • muscle strength
  • atrophy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Skeletal Muscle in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 23 April 2019 / Accepted: 24 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
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Abstract
Vitamin D (VitD) has shown to be beneficial in reversing muscle weakness and atrophy associated with VitD deficiency. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by worsening muscle weakness and muscle atrophy, with VitD deficiency commonly observed. This study aimed to investigate the effect of [...] Read more.
Vitamin D (VitD) has shown to be beneficial in reversing muscle weakness and atrophy associated with VitD deficiency. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by worsening muscle weakness and muscle atrophy, with VitD deficiency commonly observed. This study aimed to investigate the effect of VitD supplementation on dystrophic skeletal muscle. Eight-week old female control (C57BL/10; n = 29) and dystrophic (C57BL/mdx; n = 23) mice were randomly supplemented with one of three VitD enriched diets (1000, 8000 & 20,000 IU/kg chow). Following a four-week feeding period, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles contractile and fatigue properties were tested ex vivo, followed by histological analysis. As expected, mdx muscles displayed higher mass yet lower specific forces and a rightward shift in their force frequency relationship consistent with dystrophic pathology. There was a trend for mdx muscle mass to be larger following the 20,000 IU/kg diet, but this did not result in improved force production. Fiber area in the EDL was larger in mdx compared to controls, and there were higher amounts of damage in both muscles, with VitD supplementation having no effect. Four weeks of VitD supplementation did not appear to have any impact upon dystrophic skeletal muscle pathology at this age. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Taurine and Methylprednisolone Administration at Close Proximity to the Onset of Muscle Degeneration Is Ineffective at Attenuating Force Loss in the Hind-Limb of 28 Days Mdx Mice
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 26 September 2018 / Accepted: 28 September 2018 / Published: 30 September 2018
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Abstract
An increasing number of studies have shown supplementation with the amino acid taurine to have promise in ameliorating dystrophic symptoms in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Here we build on this limited body of work by investigating the efficacy [...] Read more.
An increasing number of studies have shown supplementation with the amino acid taurine to have promise in ameliorating dystrophic symptoms in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Here we build on this limited body of work by investigating the efficacy of supplementing mdx mice with taurine postnatally at a time suggestive of when dystrophic symptoms would begin to manifest in humans, and when treatments would likely begin. Mdx mice were given either taurine (mdx tau), the steroid alpha methylprednisolone (PDN), or tau + PDN (mdx tau + PDN). Taurine (2.5% wt/vol) enriched drinking water was given from 14 days and PDN (1 mg/kg daily) from 18 days. Wild-type (WT, C57BL10/ScSn) mice were used as a control to mdx mice to represent healthy tissue. In the mdx mouse, peak damage occurs at 28 days, and in situ assessment of contractile characteristics showed that taurine, PDN, and the combined taurine + PDN treatment was ineffective at attenuating the force loss experienced by mdx mice. Given the benefits of taurine as well as methylprednisolone reported previously, when supplemented at close proximity to the onset of severity muscle degeneration these benefits are no longer apparent. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective
Precision Medicine and Exercise Therapy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Received: 25 October 2018 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
Precision medicine is being discussed and incorporated at all levels of health care and disease prevention, management, and treatment. Key components include new taxonomies of disease classification, the measurement and incorporation of genetics and “omics” data, biomarkers, and health care professionals who can [...] Read more.
Precision medicine is being discussed and incorporated at all levels of health care and disease prevention, management, and treatment. Key components include new taxonomies of disease classification, the measurement and incorporation of genetics and “omics” data, biomarkers, and health care professionals who can optimize this information for a precision approach to treatment. The study and treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is making rapid advances in these areas in addition to rapid advances in new gene and cell-based therapies. New therapies will increase the variability in disease severity, furthering a need for a precision-based approach. An area of therapy that is rarely considered in this approach is how the physiology of muscle contractions will interact with these therapies and a precision approach. As muscle pathology improves, physical activity levels will increase, which will likely be very beneficial to some patients but likely not to all. Physical activity is likely to synergistically improve these therapies and can be used to enhance muscle health and quality of life after these therapies are delivered using the tools of precision medicine. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Exercise will be Personalized Medicine for Patients with DMD

Matthew Kostek
[email protected]
Sports EISSN 2075-4663 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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