Special Issue "Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Aaron Scanlan

Senior Lecturer in Exercise and Sport Sciences, School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences
Director of the Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: basketball; team sport; fitness and performance assessment; monitoring in sport
Guest Editor
Dr. Vincent Dalbo

Senior Lecturer, Medical and Applied Sciences
Director, Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: aging; skeletal muscle; disease prevention; oxidative stress, public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Baskeball is an international team sport, played across various competition levels by males and females, in over 200 countries. Despite the global popularity of basketball, limited research has been published regarding basketball practice and performance compared to other team sports. As a result, the aim of this Special Issue is to collate submissions specific to basketball on topics that may include, but are not limited to, fitness and performance assessment, player monitoring, training approaches, nutritional and recovery strategies, fatigue, technological advances, psychology, skill development, game-related statistics, and coaching. We are particulalry interested in submissions with applied outcomes for basketball practitioners centred on improving practices in basketball and aspects of player performance. Meta-anlayses, reviews, perspectives, opinion articles, commentaries, and original work will be considered for publication.

Dr. Aaron Scanlan
Dr. Vincent Dalbo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Time-motion analysis
  • Training load
  • Strength and conditioning
  • Physiology
  • Skills
  • Game statistics

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Negative Influence of Air Travel on Health and Performance in the National Basketball Association: A Narrative Review
Received: 3 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 24 August 2018 / Published: 30 August 2018
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Abstract
Air travel requirements are a concern for National Basketball Association (NBA) coaches, players, and owners, as sport-based research has demonstrated short-haul flights (≤6 h) increase injury risk and impede performance. However, examination of the impact of air travel on player health and performance [...] Read more.
Air travel requirements are a concern for National Basketball Association (NBA) coaches, players, and owners, as sport-based research has demonstrated short-haul flights (≤6 h) increase injury risk and impede performance. However, examination of the impact of air travel on player health and performance specifically in the NBA is scarce. Therefore, we conducted a narrative review of literature examining the influence of air travel on health and performance in team sport athletes with suggestions for future research directions in the NBA. Prominent empirical findings and practical recommendations are highlighted pertaining to sleep, nutrition, recovery, and scheduling strategies to alleviate the negative effects of air travel on health and performance in NBA players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
Open AccessArticle
Seasonal and Longitudinal Changes in Body Composition by Sport-Position in NCAA Division I Basketball Athletes
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the body composition of male and female basketball athletes (n = 323) across season, year, and sport-position using air displacement plethysmography. An independent sample t-test assessed sport-position differences. An analysis of variance was [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to assess the body composition of male and female basketball athletes (n = 323) across season, year, and sport-position using air displacement plethysmography. An independent sample t-test assessed sport-position differences. An analysis of variance was used to assess within-subjects across season (pre-season, in-season, and off-season), and academic year (freshman, sophomore, and junior). For both men and women basketball (MBB, WBB) athletes, guards had the lowest body fat, fat mass, fat free mass, and body mass. No seasonal differences were observed in MBB, but following in-season play for WBB, a reduction of (p = 0.03) in fat free mass (FFM) was observed. Across years, MBB showed an increase in FFM from freshman to sophomore year, yet remained unchanged through junior year. For WBB across years, no differences occurred for body mass (BM), body fat (BF%), and fat mass (FM), yet FFM increased from sophomore to junior year (p = 0.009). Sport-position differences exist in MBB and WBB: Guards were found to be smaller and leaner than forwards. Due to the importance of body composition (BC) on athletic performance, along with seasonal and longitudinal shifts in BC, strength and conditioning practitioners should periodically assess athletes BC to ensure preservation of FFM. Training and nutrition programming can then be adjusted in response to changes in BC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
Open AccessArticle
Relation between Motor and Cognitive Skills in Italian Basketball Players Aged between 7 and 10 Years Old
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 13 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
There is evidence supporting a correlation between motor, attention and working memory in children. This present study focuses on children aged between 7 and 10 years, who have been playing basketball in the last two years. The aim of this study is to [...] Read more.
There is evidence supporting a correlation between motor, attention and working memory in children. This present study focuses on children aged between 7 and 10 years, who have been playing basketball in the last two years. The aim of this study is to verify the correlation between cognitive and motor abilities and to understand the importance of this correlation in basketball practice. A total of 75 children who were 7.2–10.99 years old were assessed in terms of their attention, motor manual sequences and visuo-spatial working memory. A regression analysis was provided. In this sample, the motor abilities of children were found to be correlated with attention (denomination task, R2 = 0.07), visuo-spatial working memory (R2 = 0.06) and motor manual sequencing (aiming and catching task, R2 = 0.05; and manual dexterity task, R2 = 0.10). These correlations justify the suggestion to introduce deeper cognitive involvement during basketball training. The development of executive functions could have an important impact on basketball practice and the introduction of attention and memory tasks could help coaches to obtain optimal improvement in performance during the training sessions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Effect of Match Schedule on Accelerometry-Derived Exercise Dose during Training Sessions throughout a Competitive Basketball Season
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 12 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
Accelerometry-derived exercise dose (intensity × duration) was assessed throughout a competitive basketball season. Nine elite basketballers wore accelerometers during a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (Yo-Yo-IR1) and during three two-week blocks of training that represented phases of the season defined as easy, medium, and [...] Read more.
Accelerometry-derived exercise dose (intensity × duration) was assessed throughout a competitive basketball season. Nine elite basketballers wore accelerometers during a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (Yo-Yo-IR1) and during three two-week blocks of training that represented phases of the season defined as easy, medium, and hard based on difficulty of match schedule. Exercise dose was determined using accumulated impulse (accelerometry-derived average net force × duration). Relative exercise intensity was quantified using linear relationships between average net force and oxygen consumption during the Yo-Yo-IR1. Time spent in different intensity zones was computed. Influences of match schedule difficulty and playing position were evaluated. Exercise dose reduced for recovery and pre-match tapering sessions during the medium match schedule. Exercise dose did not vary during the hard match schedule. Exercise dose was not different between playing positions. The majority of activity during training was spent performing sedentary behaviour or very light intensity activity (64.3 ± 6.1%). Front-court players performed a greater proportion of very light intensity activity (mean difference: 6.8 ± 2.8%), whereas back-court players performed more supramaximal intensity activity (mean difference: 4.5 ± 1.0%). No positional differences existed in the proportion of time in all other intensity zones. Objective evaluation of exercise dose might allow coaches to better prescribe and monitor the demands of basketball training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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Open AccessArticle
Regional Differences in Women’s Basketball: A Comparison among Continental Championships
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
The aims of this study were (i) to compare basketball game-related statistics in women by region (Africa, America, Asia, Europe), and (ii) to identify characteristics that discriminate performances for each region. A total of 134 games from each continental championship held in 2017 [...] Read more.
The aims of this study were (i) to compare basketball game-related statistics in women by region (Africa, America, Asia, Europe), and (ii) to identify characteristics that discriminate performances for each region. A total of 134 games from each continental championship held in 2017 were analyzed. A one-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparison was performed to evaluate differences in each variable between the continents. A discriminant analysis was performed to identify game-related statistics that discriminate among the continents. The Asian and European championships overall showed similar performance profiles: Low numbers of possessions and turnovers, and high numbers of successful field goals and assists. However, the European championship was more closely contested than the Asian championship. The African championship was characterized by high numbers of possessions, free throws, and turnovers. The homogeneity of the American championship was low, and some of the cases have similarities with the African championship, whereas other cases have similarities with the European championship. On average, the American championship was characterized by low numbers of successful field goals and assists, and high numbers of steals and turnovers. It is suggested that women’s basketball games are played in a different manner in each region of the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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Open AccessArticle
Scoring Strategies Differentiating between Winning and Losing Teams during FIBA EuroBasket Women 2017
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 23 May 2018 / Accepted: 25 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
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Abstract
This study aimed to examine the scoring strategies differentiating between winning and losing teams during FIBA EuroBasket Women 2017 in relation to different game scores. Data were gathered for all games of FIBA EuroBasket Women 2017 from the official website. The investigated scoring [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the scoring strategies differentiating between winning and losing teams during FIBA EuroBasket Women 2017 in relation to different game scores. Data were gathered for all games of FIBA EuroBasket Women 2017 from the official website. The investigated scoring strategies were fast break points (FBP); points in the paint (PP); points from turnover (PT); second chance points (SCP); and points from the bench (PB). Games were classified with cluster analysis based on their score difference as close, balanced, and unbalanced and the differences in the scoring strategies between winning and losing teams were assessed using magnitude-based statistics. Results revealed no substantial differences in FBP in any investigated cluster. Furthermore, winning teams showed a substantially higher number of PP and PT (in close and unbalanced games) and SCP (in balanced and unbalanced games) compared to losing teams. Finally, winning teams scored substantially lower and higher number of BPs in close games and unbalanced games, respectively, compared to losing teams. In conclusion, all the investigated scoring strategies discriminate between winning and losing teams in elite women’s basketball except for FBP. These results provide useful information for basketball coaches to optimize their training sessions and game strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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Open AccessArticle
Anthropometric Variables and Somatotype of Young and Professional Male Basketball Players
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (623 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Determining somatic models and profiles in young athletes has recently become a fundamental element in selecting basketball playing positions. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the body build of young and adult elite male basketball players at [...] Read more.
Background: Determining somatic models and profiles in young athletes has recently become a fundamental element in selecting basketball playing positions. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the body build of young and adult elite male basketball players at different playing positions. Methods: Participants consisted of 35 young (age: 14.09 ± 0.30 years, n = 35) and 35 adult professional basketball players (age: 24.45 ± 5.40 years, n = 35) competing in elite leagues. The anthropometric characteristics assessed included body mass, body height, skinfolds, somatotypes, girths, and breadths. Results: The centers in both age groups were significantly taller and heavier (p < 0.001) compared to forwards and guards. The greatest difference between categories were in the guards’ personal height (from 169.36 to 186.68 = 17.32 cm). The guards from the professional team were closest in height to the forwards (difference = 7.17 cm) compared to young players where the difference between guards and forwards was 13.23 cm. Young competitors were more ectomorphic (2.12-3.75-4.17), while professional players were more mesomorphic (2.26-4.57-3.04). Significant criteria for center selection at professional level seems to be personal height and arm span ratio. Conclusions: The results indicate that the selection for basketball playing positions should include the analysis of body height and mass, shoulder breadth, humerus breadth, femur breadth and specifically for centers the difference between personal the height and arm span. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Team Performance Indicators Explain Outcome during Women’s Basketball Matches at the Olympic Games
Received: 19 October 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 17 December 2017
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Abstract
The Olympic Games is the pinnacle international sporting competition with team sport coaches interested in key performance indicators to assist the development of match strategies for success. This study examined the relationship between team performance indicators and match outcome during the women’s basketball [...] Read more.
The Olympic Games is the pinnacle international sporting competition with team sport coaches interested in key performance indicators to assist the development of match strategies for success. This study examined the relationship between team performance indicators and match outcome during the women’s basketball tournament at the Olympic Games. Team performance indicators were collated from all women’s basketball matches during the 2004–2016 Olympic Games (n = 156) and analyzed via linear (binary logistic regression) and non-linear (conditional interference (CI) classification tree) statistical techniques. The most parsimonious linear model retained “defensive rebounds”, “field-goal percentage”, “offensive rebounds”, “fouls”, “steals”, and “turnovers” with a classification accuracy of 85.6%. The CI classification tree retained four performance indicators with a classification accuracy of 86.2%. The combination of “field-goal percentage”, “defensive rebounds”, “steals”, and “turnovers” provided the greatest probability of winning (91.1%), while a combination of “field-goal percentage”, “steals”, and “turnovers” provided the greatest probability of losing (96.7%). Shooting proficiency and defensive actions were identified as key team performance indicators for Olympic female basketball success. The development of key defensive strategies and/or the selection of athletes highly proficient in defensive actions may strengthen Olympic match success. Incorporation of non-linear analyses may provide teams with superior/practical approaches for elite sporting success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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Open AccessArticle
Variability of Jump Kinetics Related to Training Load in Elite Female Basketball
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 1 November 2017 / Accepted: 2 November 2017 / Published: 4 November 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in jump performance and variability in elite female basketballers. Junior and senior female representative basketball players (n = 10) aged 18 ± 2 years participated in this study. Countermovement jump (CMJ) data was [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in jump performance and variability in elite female basketballers. Junior and senior female representative basketball players (n = 10) aged 18 ± 2 years participated in this study. Countermovement jump (CMJ) data was collected with a Gymaware™ optical encoder at pre-, mid-, and post-season time points across 10 weeks. Jump performance was maintained across the course of the full season (from pre to post). Concentric peak velocity, jump height, and dip showed the most stability from pre- to post-season, with the %CV ranging from 5.6–8.9%. In the period of the highest training load (mid-season), the variability of within-subject performance was reduced by approximately 2–4% in all measures except for jump height. Altered jump mechanics through a small (0.26 effect size) increase in dip were evident at mid-season, suggesting that CMJ analysis is useful for coaches to use as an in-season monitoring tool. The highest coefficient of variation (8–22%CV) in inter-set scores in all measures except eccentric peak velocity also occurred mid-season. It appears that in-season load not only impairs jump performance, but also movement variability in basketball players. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Monitoring and Managing Fatigue in Basketball
Received: 8 January 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (445 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The sport of basketball exposes athletes to frequent high intensity movements including sprinting, jumping, accelerations, decelerations and changes of direction during training and competition which can lead to acute and accumulated chronic fatigue. Fatigue may affect the ability of the athlete to perform [...] Read more.
The sport of basketball exposes athletes to frequent high intensity movements including sprinting, jumping, accelerations, decelerations and changes of direction during training and competition which can lead to acute and accumulated chronic fatigue. Fatigue may affect the ability of the athlete to perform over the course of a lengthy season. The ability of practitioners to quantify the workload and subsequent fatigue in basketball athletes in order to monitor and manage fatigue levels may be beneficial in maintaining high levels of performance and preventing unfavorable physical and physiological training adaptations. There is currently limited research quantifying training or competition workload outside of time motion analysis in basketball. In addition, systematic research investigating methods to monitor and manage athlete fatigue in basketball throughout a season is scarce. To effectively optimize and maintain peak training and playing performance throughout a basketball season, potential workload and fatigue monitoring strategies need to be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Practice and Performance in Basketball)
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