Brain Activity in Sports and Exercise

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2018) | Viewed by 15036

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Exercise Science, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244, USA
Interests: physical activity; mental health; affect; emotion; mood; concussion; mTBI; cognitive function; resistance exercise
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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Program of Integrative Medicine, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC , 27599, USA
Interests: exercise; physical activity; martial arts; cancer; mHealth; cognition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue, “Brain Activity in Sports and Exercise”, is a new venue to publish original research, meta-analysis, reviews, and brief reports related to this topic. By taking advantage of the rapid advancements in neuroimaging techniques and subsequent creation of the field of Cognitive Neuroscience, the field of Kinesiology/Exercise Science has adopted these techniques and paradigms to provide insight into the activity of the brain relative to sports and exercise. This collection aims to publish research on this emerging area and may include techniques, such as EEG; ERP; NIRS; fMRI; FMS; tDCS; DTI; PET; TCLS, etc. We are interested in articles that bring new theoretical and practical approaches to the field.

Prof. Eric E. Hall
Dr. Aaron Piepmeier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Cognitive Performance
  • Cognitive Function
  • Mental Health
  • Sport/Exercise Performance
  • Brain Structure
  • Neuroimaging

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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494 KiB  
Article
To Take the Stairs or Not to Take the Stairs? Employing the Reflective–Impulsive Model to Predict Spontaneous Physical Activity
by Marcos Daou, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller
Sports 2017, 5(4), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5040075 - 29 Sep 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3427
Abstract
The reflective–impulsive model (RIM) has been employed to explain various health behaviors. The present study used RIM to predict a spontaneous physical activity behavior. Specifically, 107 participants (75 females; Mage = 20.6 years, SD = 1.92 years) completed measures of (1) reflections [...] Read more.
The reflective–impulsive model (RIM) has been employed to explain various health behaviors. The present study used RIM to predict a spontaneous physical activity behavior. Specifically, 107 participants (75 females; Mage = 20.6 years, SD = 1.92 years) completed measures of (1) reflections about spontaneous physical activity, as indexed by self-report questionnaire; (2) impulse toward physical activity, as indexed by the manikin task; and (3) (state) self-control, as indexed by the Stroop task. The dependent variable was whether participants took the stairs or the elevator to the study laboratory. Results revealed reflections toward spontaneous physical activity positively predicted stair-taking. Further, a significant impulse toward physical activity × self-control interaction was observed. This interaction revealed that participants with high self-control who had a high impulse toward PA were more likely to take the stairs than their counterparts with a low impulse toward PA, whereas the opposite was the case for participants with low self-control. However, the impulse × self-control interaction was not significant when employing a self-report measure of trait self-control. Thus, RIM may be a good framework with which to consider spontaneous physical activity, but careful consideration must be given when examining variables within RIM (e.g., the boundary condition of self-control). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Activity in Sports and Exercise)
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759 KiB  
Article
Executive Function and the P300 after Treadmill Exercise and Futsal in College Soccer Players
by Junyeon Won, Shanshan Wu, Hongquing Ji, J. Carson Smith and Jungjun Park
Sports 2017, 5(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5040073 - 26 Sep 2017
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5002
Abstract
(1) Background: Although a body of evidence demonstrates that acute exercise improves executive function, few studies have compared more complex, laboratory-based modes of exercise, such as soccer that involve multiple aspects of the environment. (2) Methods: Twelve experienced soccer players (24.8 ± 2 [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Although a body of evidence demonstrates that acute exercise improves executive function, few studies have compared more complex, laboratory-based modes of exercise, such as soccer that involve multiple aspects of the environment. (2) Methods: Twelve experienced soccer players (24.8 ± 2 years) completed three counterbalanced 20 min sessions of (1) seated rest; (2) moderate intensity treadmill exercise; and (3) a game of futsal. Once heart rate returned to within 10% of pre-activity levels, participants completed the Stroop Color Word Conflict Task while reaction time (RT) and P300 event-related potentials were measured. (3) Results: Reaction time during Stroop performance was significantly faster following the futsal game and treadmill exercise compared to the seated rest. The P300 amplitude during Stroop performance was significantly greater following futsal relative to both treadmill and seated-rest conditions. (4) Conclusions: These findings suggest that single bouts of indoor soccer among college-aged soccer players, compared to treadmill and seated-rest conditions, may engender the greatest effect on brain networks controlling attention allocation and classification speed during the performance of an inhibitory control task. Future research is needed to determine if cognitively engaging forms of aerobic exercise may differentially impact executive control processes in less experienced and older adult participants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Activity in Sports and Exercise)
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Review

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11 pages, 466 KiB  
Review
Influence of Concussion History and Genetics on Event-Related Potentials in Athletes: Potential Use in Concussion Management
by Taylor Guth, Caroline J. Ketcham and Eric E. Hall
Sports 2018, 6(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6010005 - 19 Jan 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6037
Abstract
Sports-related concussions are an increasing public health issue with much concern about the possible long-term decrements in cognitive function and quality of life that may occur in athletes. The measurement of cognitive function is a common component of concussion management protocols due to [...] Read more.
Sports-related concussions are an increasing public health issue with much concern about the possible long-term decrements in cognitive function and quality of life that may occur in athletes. The measurement of cognitive function is a common component of concussion management protocols due to cognitive impairments that occur after sustaining a concussion; however, the tools that are often used may not be sensitive enough to expose long term problems with cognitive function. The current paper is a brief review, which suggests that measuring cognitive processing through the use of event related potentials (ERPs) may provide a more sensitive assessment of cognitive function, as shown through recent research showing concussion history to influence ERPs components. The potential influence of genetics on cognitive function and ERPs components will also be discussed in relation to future concussion management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Activity in Sports and Exercise)
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