Special Issue "Identity, Stigma, and Social Reaction"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Daniel R. Kavish
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Sciences, College of Arts & Sciences, Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Interests: labeling theory, convict criminology, deviant subcultures, and racial disparities in the criminal justice system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A great deal of theoretical and empirical work has examined the relationship between identity, social reaction, and stigma. Symbolic Interaction, labeling, and identity perspectives identify how social reaction can perpetuate stigma and stereotypes. Furthermore, these perspectives describe the process of identity transformation and how subsequent behavior is influenced. Essentially, to understand social behavior, one must understand the relationships between social interaction, identity, and stigma.

This Special Issue intends to advance current discussions on identity, stigma, and social reactions; it welcomes contributions that expand our understanding at all levels of analysis of: 1) formal labeling and subsequent criminal offending, 2) the relationships between social interactions and stigma, 3) identity formation and transformation, 4) official labeling and criminalization of deviant behavior, or 5) methodological issues related to the study of symbolic interactionism, labeling theory, and other identity perspectives. The intersectional and interdisciplinary nature of studying identity, social interaction, stigma, and social behavior demands that papers from all relevant behavioral and social sciences be welcomed. Likewise, all theoretical, epistemological, and methodological approaches are welcomed.

Dr. Daniel R. Kavish
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • labeling theory
  • symbolic interactionism
  • identity
  • stigma
  • social reaction
  • deviant behavior

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Denying the Darkness: Exploring the Discourses of Neutralization of Bundy, Gacy, and Dahmer
Societies 2019, 9(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9020046 - 11 Jun 2019
Abstract
This exploratory study analyzed how three serial killers (i.e., Bundy, Gacy, and Dahmer) potentially rationalized and justified their murders by applying techniques of neutralization. This paper discusses how the use of these neutralizations also functions as a form of stigma management assisting in [...] Read more.
This exploratory study analyzed how three serial killers (i.e., Bundy, Gacy, and Dahmer) potentially rationalized and justified their murders by applying techniques of neutralization. This paper discusses how the use of these neutralizations also functions as a form of stigma management assisting in the maintenance of a positive presentation of self, thus mitigating responsibility for their crimes. This study conducted a content analysis of data comprised from interviews and case histories of these three serial killers. Based on these analyses, the impression is conveyed that these killers used neutralizations to manage their identities (i.e., present “normal” selves), mitigate responsibility for their actions, and minimize the stigma associated with being labeled a serial killer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identity, Stigma, and Social Reaction)
Open AccessArticle
Community Knowledge about Tuberculosis and Perception about Tuberculosis-Associated Stigma in Pakistan
Societies 2019, 9(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9010009 - 23 Jan 2019
Abstract
Tuberculosis- (TB) associated stigma is a well-documented phenomenon with various factors, both individual and societal, manifesting its role in shaping health-seeking behavior and contributing to suboptimal TB care in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to assess TB-related knowledge and perceived stigma [...] Read more.
Tuberculosis- (TB) associated stigma is a well-documented phenomenon with various factors, both individual and societal, manifesting its role in shaping health-seeking behavior and contributing to suboptimal TB care in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to assess TB-related knowledge and perceived stigma among community members. This was a cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of 183 individuals recruited between October and December 2017. A validated stigma measurement tool developed by Van Rie et al. was adapted. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. A clear majority was aware that TB is curable disease and that it is transmitted by coughing. However, respondents also thought that TB spread through contaminated food, sharing meals, sharing utensils, and by having sexual intercourse with a TB patient. In addition, females, unemployed, and persons having less than six years of education were also more likely to associate stigma with TB. We found an association between the lack of knowledge about TB and perceived stigma. This study highlights the need for improved TB-related education among communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identity, Stigma, and Social Reaction)
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