Special Issue "Advances in Micro-Solid Phase Extraction"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rafael Lucena
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Universidad de Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain
Interests: sample preparation; microextraction; nanoparticles and ionic liquid
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sample preparation has been the focus of continuous evolution over the last two decades, giving rise to a number of novel analytical developments. These new approaches have allowed the simplification and miniaturization of the analytical processes that also have clear environmental and operator safety connotations. In this context, the relevance of microextraction techniques is beyond any doubt, and their potential has been clearly demonstrated at both the research and routine laboratory levels.

Micro-solid phase extraction is a vast term that involves several techniques that share a common characteristic, the use of low amounts of sorptive phases for the isolation of the target analytes from a given sample. The sorptive capacity that is relevant in any extraction technique becomes critical in this scenario. This explains why the development of new sorptive phases (e.g., polymers, nanoparticles, composites) has been one of the main research lines in this context.

The present Special Issue is focused on new achievements in micro-solid phase extraction techniques. Although descriptions of novel sorptive materials and extraction strategies are warmly suggested, the applications of this technique for the resolution of critical analytical problems in different fields are also welcome.

Dr. Rafael Lucena
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microextraction
  • sorptive phases
  • nanoparticles
  • composites

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Methodology to Remove Strong Outliers of Non-Climacteric Melon Fruit Aroma at Harvest Obtained by HS-SPME GC-MS Analysis
Separations 2018, 5(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations5020030 - 01 Jun 2018
Abstract
A methodology for making consistent studies of outliers of non-climacteric melon volatile organic compounds at harvest is reported. The juice was squeezed from the fruit of the ‘Piel de sapo’ cultivar harvested during two consecutive seasons and the aroma volatiles were extracted by [...] Read more.
A methodology for making consistent studies of outliers of non-climacteric melon volatile organic compounds at harvest is reported. The juice was squeezed from the fruit of the ‘Piel de sapo’ cultivar harvested during two consecutive seasons and the aroma volatiles were extracted by headspace solid phase microextraction and measured by gas chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry. A deconvolution analysis was performed to obtain volatile organic compounds. For multivariate the reliable identification of outliers, compound classes were studied as a percentage of total area counts of the melon compounds identified in the chromatogram by principal component analysis and partial least-squares discriminant analysis, and then verified by correlation analysis, box-whisker plot, and formal tests for univariate outliers. Principal component analysis was the key methodology for selecting outliers in variables that mostly did not follow a normal distribution. The presence of an excess in terms of relative percentage of area and the diversity of minor compounds such as alcohols, terpenes, acids, among others, are usually a sign of anomalous data that can be considered outliers in the aroma of this non-climacteric cultivar. This multivariate approach removed outliers, but kept the variability of aroma among the samples of every cultivar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Micro-Solid Phase Extraction)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Natural Variation of Volatile Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil Analyzed by HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID
Separations 2018, 5(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations5020024 - 16 Apr 2018
Abstract
Virgin olive oil is unique among plant oils for its high levels of oleic acid, and the presence of a wide range of minor components, which are responsible for both its health-promoting properties and characteristic aroma, and only produced when olives are crushed [...] Read more.
Virgin olive oil is unique among plant oils for its high levels of oleic acid, and the presence of a wide range of minor components, which are responsible for both its health-promoting properties and characteristic aroma, and only produced when olives are crushed during the industrial process used for oil production. The genetic variability of the major volatile compounds comprising the oil aroma was studied in a representative sample of olive cultivars from the World Olive Germplasm Collection (IFAPA, Cordoba, Spain), by means of the headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography–mass spectrometry–flame ionization detection (HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID). The analytical data demonstrated that a high variability is found for the content of volatile compounds in olive species, and that most of the volatile compounds found in the oils were synthesized by the enzymes included in the so-called lipoxygenase pathway. Multivariate analysis allowed the identification of cultivars that are particularly interesting, in terms of volatile composition and presumed organoleptic quality, which can be used both to identify old olive cultivars that give rise to oils with a high organoleptic quality, and in parent selection for olive breeding programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Micro-Solid Phase Extraction)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop