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Special Issue "Sensors and Data Processing Techniques for Cultural Heritage"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 2799

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Sylvie Le Hégarat-Mascle
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Systems and Applications of Information & Energy Technologies Laboratory (SATIE), University Paris-Saclay, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Interests: data fusion; computer vision
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Emanuel Aldea
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Systems and Applications of Information & Energy Technologies Laboratory (SATIE), University Paris-Saclay, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Interests: computer vision; machine learning
Dr. Piercarlo Dondi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 5, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: computer vision; human-computer interaction; 3D modelling; digital humanities
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to studies revolving around cultural heritage, covering aspects such as the 3D digitization of monuments, object reconstruction, classification, and artwork conservation. New sensors or settings have been proposed as well as new processing techniques, such as the use of sensor multi-modalities or artificial intelligence, particularly machine and deep learning. Nevertheless, several challenges remain. The aim of this Special Issue is to promote original and novel developments in cultural heritage studies, with topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Multiview camera systems for 3D reconstruction;
  • Setting and interpretation of multispectral, hyperspectral or Raman imaging;
  • Acquisition and processing of acoustic imaging;
  • Non-invasive chemical data acquisition and analysis;
  • Multi-modality and/or multi-sensor fusion;
  • Analysis of rare or particular types of artwork (e.g., historical musical instruments);
  • Machine and deep learning in the case of limited data availability;
  • On-site evaluation of artwork conservation status;
  • Early-stage alteration detection.

Prof. Dr. Sylvie Le Hégarat-Mascle
Dr. Emanuel Aldea
Dr. Piercarlo Dondi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Image-Based Automated Width Measurement of Surface Cracking
Sensors 2021, 21(22), 7534; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21227534 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
The detection of cracks is an important monitoring task in civil engineering infrastructure devoted to ensuring durability, structural safety, and integrity. It has been traditionally performed by visual inspection, and the measurement of crack width has been manually obtained with a crack-width comparator [...] Read more.
The detection of cracks is an important monitoring task in civil engineering infrastructure devoted to ensuring durability, structural safety, and integrity. It has been traditionally performed by visual inspection, and the measurement of crack width has been manually obtained with a crack-width comparator gauge (CWCG). Unfortunately, this technique is time-consuming, suffers from subjective judgement, and is error-prone due to the difficulty of ensuring a correct spatial measurement as the CWCG may not be correctly positioned in accordance with the crack orientation. Although algorithms for automatic crack detection have been developed, most of them have specifically focused on solving the segmentation problem through Deep Learning techniques failing to address the underlying problem: crack width evaluation, which is critical for the assessment of civil structures. This paper proposes a novel automated method for surface cracking width measurement based on digital image processing techniques. Our proposal consists of three stages: anisotropic smoothing, segmentation, and stabilized central points by k-means adjustment and allows the characterization of both crack width and curvature-related orientation. The method is validated by assessing the surface cracking of fiber-reinforced earthen construction materials. The preliminary results show that the proposal is robust, efficient, and highly accurate at estimating crack width in digital images. The method effectively discards false cracks and detects real ones as small as 0.15 mm width regardless of the lighting conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors and Data Processing Techniques for Cultural Heritage)
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Article
Characterization of Temperature Gradients According to Height in a Baroque Church by Means of Wireless Sensors
Sensors 2021, 21(20), 6921; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21206921 - 19 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 543
Abstract
The baroque church of Saint Thomas and Saint Philip Neri (Valencia, Spain), which was built between 1727 and 1736, contains valuable paintings by renowned Spanish artists. Due to the considerable height of the central nave, the church can experience vertical temperature gradients. In [...] Read more.
The baroque church of Saint Thomas and Saint Philip Neri (Valencia, Spain), which was built between 1727 and 1736, contains valuable paintings by renowned Spanish artists. Due to the considerable height of the central nave, the church can experience vertical temperature gradients. In order to investigate this issue, temperatures were recorded between August 2017 and February 2018 from a wireless monitoring system composed of 21 sensor nodes, which were located at different heights in the church from 2 to 13 m from the floor level. For characterizing the temperature at high, medium and low altitude heights, a novel methodology is proposed based on sparse Partial Least Squares regression (sPLS), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and the Holt-Winters method, among others, which were applied to a time series of temperature. This approach is helpful to discriminate temperature profiles according to sensor height. Once the vertical thermal gradients for each month were characterized, it was found that temperature reached the maximum correlation with sensor height in the period between August 10th and September 9th. Furthermore, the most important features from the time series that explain this correlation are the mean temperature and the mean of moving range. In the period mentioned, the vertical thermal gradient was estimated to be about 0.043 C/m, which implies a difference of 0.47 C on average between sensor nodes at 2 m from the floor with respect to the upper ones located at 13 m from the floor level. The gradient was estimated as the slope from a linear regression model using height and hourly mean temperature as the predictor and response, respectively. This gradient is consistent with similar reported studies. The fact that such gradient was only found in one month suggests that the mechanisms of dust deposition on walls involved in vertical thermal gradients are not important in this case regarding the preventive conservation of artworks. Furthermore, the methodology proposed here was useful to discriminate the time series at high, medium and low altitude levels. This approach can be useful when a set of sensors is installed for microclimate monitoring in churches, cathedrals, and other historical buildings, at different levels and positions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors and Data Processing Techniques for Cultural Heritage)
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Article
Spectral Relative Attenuation of Solar Radiation through a Skylight Focused on Preventive Conservation: Museo De L’almoina in Valencia (Spain) Case Study
Sensors 2021, 21(14), 4651; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21144651 - 07 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 909
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative attenuation of VIS, UV and NIR solar radiation through a large pond skylight into the interior of the l’Almoina Archaeological Museum (Valencia, Spain), and to determine how relative attenuation varied throughout the [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative attenuation of VIS, UV and NIR solar radiation through a large pond skylight into the interior of the l’Almoina Archaeological Museum (Valencia, Spain), and to determine how relative attenuation varied throughout the year and time of day. Measurements were taken at 9:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. during July 2019 and January 2020. Relative attenuation values were obtained from the measurement of spectral irradiance in the exterior and at different points in the interior by means of two Ocean Optics spectrometers: HR4000CG-UV-NIR for VIS (400–700 nm) and NIR (700–1000 nm) bands, and FLAME-S-UV-VIS for UV-A (280–315 nm) and UV-A (315–400 nm) bands. The central points of the skylight had relative attenuation at 520 nm, reaching a value of 50% in summer at noon and 38% in the afternoon. At noon in winter, there were two relative attenuation peaks above 33% at 520 nm and at 900 nm. For mean relative attenuation, in the UVB range, the highest relative attenuation (20%) was inside the ruins in the morning in both summer and winter, and the UVA band relative attenuation was quite constant throughout the museum, but lower than that of the UVB band, in the range 0–3%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors and Data Processing Techniques for Cultural Heritage)
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