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Recent Advances in Optical Fiber Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 3100

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
PhotonLab, Department of Electronics & Telecommunications, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino, Italy
Interests: optical fiber sensors for the detection of physical quantities and chemicals; distributed optical fiber sensing; fiber Bragg gratings and periodic structures; optical waveguides; characterization of optical devices and optical measurements

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Guest Editor
1. School of Engineering and Digital Sciences, Nazarbayev University, 010000 Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
2. National Laboratory Astana, Laboratory of Biosensors and Bioinstruments, 010000 Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
Interests: optical fiber sensors; optical biosensors; distributed sensors; bioengineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to announce and support this Issue on Recent Advances in Optical Fiber Sensors, to promote the blockbuster advancements that this field is experiencing.
Optical fibers have traditionally been regarded as a medium for high-speed and high-capacity telecommunication, but an increasing interest is building upon their use as sensors, thanks to their unique features of small form factor and remote sensing capability. In addition, optical fiber sensors can have great advantages in different frameworks, ranging from harsh environments to biomedical applications.
This Special Issue is dedicated to presenting new optical fiber sensors for the measurement of physical and chemical quantities. Contributions on both single sensors and distributed sensing techniques are welcome. New interrogation techniques for handling large arrays of sensors as well as innovative calibration and processing techniques that overcome sensitivity limits, perhaps derived from optical communications, are among the subjects of interest.

Dr. Massimo Olivero
Prof. Daniele Tosi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • optical fiber sensors
  • sensor arrays
  • biomedical sensors
  • physical sensors
  • optical fiber metrology
  • distributed optical fiber sensing
  • industrial applications of sensors
  • detection of chemicals through optical techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 4155 KiB  
Article
Serially Connected Cantilever Beam-Based FBG Accelerometers: Design, Optimization and Testing
by Aarathy Ezhuthupally Reghuprasad, Chiara Colombero and Alberto Godio
Sensors 2023, 23(6), 3188; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23063188 - 16 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1864
Abstract
We focus on the design, optimization, fabrication, and testing of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) cantilever beam-based accelerometers to measure vibrations from active seismic sources in the external environment. These FBG accelerometers possess several advantages, such as multiplexing, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high [...] Read more.
We focus on the design, optimization, fabrication, and testing of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) cantilever beam-based accelerometers to measure vibrations from active seismic sources in the external environment. These FBG accelerometers possess several advantages, such as multiplexing, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high sensitivity. Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations, calibration, fabrication, and packaging of the simple cantilever beam-based accelerometer based on polylactic acid (PLA) are presented. The influence of the cantilever beam parameters on the natural frequency and sensitivity are discussed through FEM simulation and laboratory calibration with vibration exciter. The test results show that the optimized system has a resonance frequency of 75 Hz within a measuring range of 5–55 Hz and high sensitivity of ±433.7 pm/g. Finally, a preliminary field test is conducted to compare the packaged FBG accelerometer and standard electro-mechanical 4.5-Hz vertical geophones. Active-source (seismic sledgehammer) shots are acquired along the tested line, and both systems’ experimental results are analyzed and compared. The designed FBG accelerometers demonstrate suitability to record the seismic traces and to pick up the first arrival times. The system optimization and further implementation offer promising potential for seismic acquisitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Optical Fiber Sensors)
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