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Special Issue "Satellite Remote Sensing for Volcanic Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nicola Pergola
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Di Metodologie Per L'analisi Ambientale, Tito Scalo, Tito Scalo, Italy
Interests: satellite remote sensing, earth observation, original satellite techniques
Dr. Simon Plank
Website
Guest Editor
German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD), German Aerospace Center (DLR), Germany
Interests: satellite remote sensing, natural hazards
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesco Marchese

Guest Editor
Istituto Di Metodologie Per L'analisi Ambientale, Tito Scalo, Italy
Interests: satellite remote sensing of volcanoes, fires, dust outbreaks, natural hazards
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Michael Ramsey
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Environmental Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Interests: infrared spectroscopy, remote sensing & GIS, volcanology, geomorphology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the Global Volcanism Program (2017), there are more than 1500 active volcanoes worldwide, continuously emitting a large amount of ash, gases, and hot material, menacing the security of neighboring people, the environment, infrastructures, and air traffic. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) reports that more than 26,000 people have died in volcanic disasters between 1975 and 2000. Volcanic eruptions have both social and economic impacts and, because of the increase in population worldwide, the number of people and the total cost of social infrastructure close to active volcanoes are increasing. Although significant successes have been achieved in understanding volcanoes, many crucial aspects of volcanic activity and processes still remain not fully understood. Systematic observations and continuous monitoring of volcanic activity might help in improving our knowledge and understanding of volcanic processes, in better identifying possible signs of volcanic unrest, and in properly managing and assessing the risk when an eruptive event occurs. However, many active volcanoes around the world are still inadequately or poorly monitored or not monitored at all.

Remotely sensed observations from space, offering synoptic coverage, timely and frequent sampling on large scales, and multispectral capabilities and significant cost savings compared with other observing systems and sources of information, have been largely employed for active volcano monitoring and investigations, often filling the abovementioned observational gaps. In addition to providing an actual and enhanced monitoring capability, satellite remote sensing may contribute to a better understanding of volcanic processes, providing a huge amount of data and products that can be routinely used by experts and volcanic observatories. Both passive optical instruments, including the new generation ones (e.g., Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, Multispectral Instrument Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer), and active systems (e.g., Synthetic Aperture Radar—SAR, Light detection and Ranging—LIDAR technologies) have increasingly extended the capacity in mapping and characterizing volcanic activities (e.g., lava flows, fumarole fields, deformation, eruptive plumes) better supporting traditional monitoring systems. This Special Issue focuses on innovative satellite remote sensing methodologies to study, investigate, and monitor volcanic phenomena. We encourage authors to submit original contributions on new applications and significant case studies, based on the use of satellite observations, related (but not limited) to the following main topics:   

  • Thermal volcanic activity;
  • Ash/gas emissions;
  • Deformation processes;
  • Changes of volcano topography

Contributions dealing with multiplatform observing systems and heterogeneous data integration and fusion will be particularly welcome.

Dr. Nicola Pergola
Dr. Simon Plank
Dr. Francesco Marchese
Prof. Michael Ramsey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • Earth observation
  • Volcanoes
  • Eruptions
  • Deformation
  • Volcanic ash
  • Lava flows

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Implementation of the NHI (Normalized Hot Spot Indices) Algorithm on Infrared ASTER Data: Results and Future Perspectives
Sensors 2021, 21(4), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041538 - 23 Feb 2021
Abstract
The Normalized Hotspot Indices (NHI) tool is a Google Earth Engine (GEE)-App developed to investigate and map worldwide volcanic thermal anomalies in daylight conditions, using shortwave infrared (SWIR) and near infrared (NIR) data from the Multispectral Instrument (MSI) and the Operational Land Imager [...] Read more.
The Normalized Hotspot Indices (NHI) tool is a Google Earth Engine (GEE)-App developed to investigate and map worldwide volcanic thermal anomalies in daylight conditions, using shortwave infrared (SWIR) and near infrared (NIR) data from the Multispectral Instrument (MSI) and the Operational Land Imager (OLI), respectively, onboard the Sentinel 2 and Landsat 8 satellites. The NHI tool offers the possibility of ingesting data from other sensors. In this direction, we tested the NHI algorithm for the first time on Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data. In this study, we show the results of this preliminary implementation, achieved investigating the Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Klyuchevskoy (Kamchatka; Russia), Shishaldin (Alaska; USA), and Telica (Nicaragua) thermal activities of March 2000–2008. We assessed the NHI detections through comparison with the ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA), the manual inspection of satellite imagery, and the information from volcanological reports. Results show that NHI integrated the AVA observations, with a percentage of unique thermal anomaly detections ranging between 8.8% (at Kilauea) and 100% (at Shishaldin). These results demonstrate the successful NHI exportability to ASTER data acquired before the failure of SWIR subsystem. The full ingestion of the ASTER data collection, available in GEE, within the NHI tool allows us to develop a suite of multi-platform satellite observations, including thermal anomaly products from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), which could support the investigation of active volcanoes from space, complementing information from other systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Satellite Remote Sensing for Volcanic Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Accuracy of Airborne Volcanic Ash Detection Using the GEOKOMPSAT-2A Satellite
Sensors 2021, 21(4), 1359; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041359 - 15 Feb 2021
Abstract
In this study, a technique facilitating the enhanced detection of airborne volcanic ash (VA) has been developed, which is based on the use of visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), and infrared (IR) bands by meteorological satellite systems. Channels with NIR and IR bands centered [...] Read more.
In this study, a technique facilitating the enhanced detection of airborne volcanic ash (VA) has been developed, which is based on the use of visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), and infrared (IR) bands by meteorological satellite systems. Channels with NIR and IR bands centered at ~3.8, 7.3, 8.7, 10.5, and 12.3 μm are utilized, which enhances the accuracy of VA detection. The technique is based on two-band brightness temperature differences (BTDs), two-band brightness temperature ratios (BTRs), and background image BTDs. The physical effects of the observed BTDs and BTRs, which can be used to distinguish VA from meteorological clouds based on absorption differences, depend on the channel and time of day. The Advanced Meteorological Imager onboard the GEOKOMPSAT-2A (GK-2A) satellite has several advantages, including the day- and nighttime detection of land and ocean. Based on the GK-2A data on several volcanic eruptions, multispectral data are more sensitive to volcanic clouds than ice and water clouds, ensuring the detection of VA. They can also be used as an input to provide detailed information about volcanoes, such as the height of the VA layer and VA mass. The GK-2A was optimized, and an improved ash algorithm was established by focusing on the volcanic eruptions that occurred in 2020. In particular, the 3.8 μm band was utilized, the threshold was changed by division between day and night, and efforts were made to reduce the effects of clouds and the discontinuity between land and ocean. The GK-2A imagery was used to study volcanic clouds related to the eruptions of Taal, Philippines, on 12 January and Nishinoshima, Japan, from 30 July–2 August to demonstrate the applicability of this product during volcanic events. The improved VA product of GK-2A provides vital information, helping forecasters to locate VA as well as guidance for the aviation industry in preventing dangerous and expensive interactions between aircrafts and VA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Satellite Remote Sensing for Volcanic Applications)
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