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Special Issue "Remote Sensing of Mangrove Ecosystems"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chandra Giri
Website
Guest Editor
Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis Branch, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709, USA
Interests: mangrove forests mapping and monitoring using high resolution satellite data; global and continental land cover mapping and monitoring using multi-spectral, multi-temporal, and multi-platform remotely sensed data; image pre-processing, classification, and validation using cloud computing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mangrove forests provide important ecosystem goods and services to humanity and the biosphere. However, mangrove forests are in constant flux due to both natural and anthropogenic forces. At present, conversion of mangroves to other land uses is the dominant factor responsible for the change; however, climate change (e.g., sea-level rise) is becoming increasingly dominant. The changing mangroves could serve as an indicator of climate change. Observation and monitoring of the distribution and dynamics of mangroves is central to a wide range of scientific investigations conducted in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

Recent advances in remote sensing data availability, image-processing methodologies, computing and information technology, and human resource development have provided an opportunity to observe and monitor mangroves, from local to global scales, on a regular basis. Spectral and spatial resolution of remote sensing data, and their availability, have improved, making it possible to observe and monitor mangroves in unprecedented spatial and thematic detail. Novel remote sensing platforms, such as unmanned aerial vehicles and emerging sensors, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and LiDAR, can now be used for mangrove monitoring. Furthermore, it is now possible to store and analyze large amounts of data using cloud computing.

Sensors announces a Special Issue dedicated to observation and monitoring of mangroves using remote sensing from local to global scales. The Special Issue will broadly cover application of remote sensing using optical (multi-spectral and hyperspectral), radar, and LiDAR data, obtained from multiple platforms, including ground, air, and space. Research papers are expected to use the latest techniques to acquire, manage, exploit, process, and analyze a wide variety of remote sensing data for mangrove forest applications. Applications of remote sensing products will also be included. Both research papers and innovative review papers are invited.

High-quality contributions, emphasizing (but not limited to) the topic areas listed below, are solicited for the Special Issue:

  • Application of aerial ground remote sensing, photography, multi-spectral, multi-temporal and multi-resolution, satellite data, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, hyperspectral data, and LiDAR data.
  • Application of advanced image pre-processing for geometric, radiometric, and atmospheric correction, cloud removal, image mosaicking, and cloud computing
  • Application of advanced image classification and validation techniques including supervised and unsupervised classification
  • Application of advanced image storage, retrieval, processing, and distribution techniques such as networked data transmission and distributed computing
  • Application of remote sensing to derive spatio-temporal information on mangrove forests distribution, species discrimination, forest density, forest health, mangrove expansion and contraction, carbon sequestration, and other innovative applications.

Dr. Chandra Giri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mangrove distribution
  • mangrove expansion and squeeze
  • deforestation and afforestation
  • mangrove restoration
  • species discrimination
  • stand density
  • forest health
  • forest disturbance
  • multi-platform, multi-spectral, multi-resolution data
  • image processing
  • image classification
  • results validation
  • change detection
  • cloud computing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Using Bi-Seasonal WorldView-2 Multi-Spectral Data and Supervised Random Forest Classification to Map Coastal Plant Communities in Everglades National Park
Sensors 2018, 18(3), 829; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18030829 - 09 Mar 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Coastal plant communities are being transformed or lost because of sea level rise (SLR) and land-use change. In conjunction with SLR, the Florida Everglades ecosystem has undergone large-scale drainage and restoration, altering coastal vegetation throughout south Florida. To understand how coastal plant communities [...] Read more.
Coastal plant communities are being transformed or lost because of sea level rise (SLR) and land-use change. In conjunction with SLR, the Florida Everglades ecosystem has undergone large-scale drainage and restoration, altering coastal vegetation throughout south Florida. To understand how coastal plant communities are changing over time, accurate mapping techniques are needed that can define plant communities at a fine-enough resolution to detect fine-scale changes. We explored using bi-seasonal versus single-season WorldView-2 satellite data to map three mangrove and four adjacent plant communities, including the buttonwood/glycophyte community that harbors the federally-endangered plant Chromolaena frustrata. Bi-seasonal data were more effective than single-season to differentiate all communities of interest. Bi-seasonal data combined with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) elevation data were used to map coastal plant communities of a coastal stretch within Everglades National Park (ENP). Overall map accuracy was 86%. Black and red mangroves were the dominant communities and covered 50% of the study site. All the remaining communities had ≤10% cover, including the buttonwood/glycophyte community. ENP harbors 21 rare coastal species threatened by SLR. The spatially explicit, quantitative data provided by our map provides a fine-scale baseline for monitoring future change in these species’ habitats. Our results also offer a method to monitor vegetation change in other threatened habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Mangrove Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Blue Carbon Storage by Baja California (Mexico) Tidal Wetlands and Evidence for Wetland Stability in the Face of Anthropogenic and Climatic Impacts
Sensors 2018, 18(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18010032 - 24 Dec 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Although saline tidal wetlands cover less than a fraction of one percent of the earth’s surface (~0.01%), they efficiently sequester organic carbon due to high rates of primary production coupled with surfaces that aggrade in response to sea level rise. Here, we report [...] Read more.
Although saline tidal wetlands cover less than a fraction of one percent of the earth’s surface (~0.01%), they efficiently sequester organic carbon due to high rates of primary production coupled with surfaces that aggrade in response to sea level rise. Here, we report on multi-decadal changes (1972–2008) in the extent of tidal marshes and mangroves, and characterize soil carbon density and source, for five regions of tidal wetlands located on Baja California’s Pacific coast. Land-cover change analysis indicates the stability of tidal wetlands relative to anthropogenic and climate change impacts over the past four decades, with most changes resulting from natural coastal processes that are unique to arid environments. The disturbance of wetland soils in this region (to a depth of 50 cm) would liberate 2.55 Tg of organic carbon (C) or 9.36 Tg CO2eq. Based on stoichiometry and carbon stable isotope ratios, the source of organic carbon in these wetland sediments is derived from a combination of wetland macrophyte, algal, and phytoplankton sources. The reconstruction of natural wetland dynamics in Baja California provides a counterpoint to the history of wetland destruction elsewhere in North America, and measurements provide new insights on the control of carbon sequestration in arid wetlands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Mangrove Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle
Landsat-Derived Estimates of Mangrove Extents in the Sierra Leone Coastal Landscape Complex during 1990–2016
Sensors 2018, 18(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18010012 - 21 Dec 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
This study provides the first assessment of decadal changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone. While significant advances have been made in mangrove mapping using remote sensing, no study has documented long-term changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone—one of the most vulnerable [...] Read more.
This study provides the first assessment of decadal changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone. While significant advances have been made in mangrove mapping using remote sensing, no study has documented long-term changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone—one of the most vulnerable countries in West Africa. Such understanding is critical for devising regional management strategies that can support local livelihoods. We utilize multi-date Landsat data and cloud computational techniques to quantify spatiotemporal changes in land cover, with focus on mangrove ecosystems, for 1990–2016 along the coast of Sierra Leone. We specifically focus on four estuaries—Scarcies, Sierra Leone, Yawri Bay, and Sherbro. We relied on the k-means approach for an unsupervised classification, and validated the classified map from 2016 using ground truth data collected from Sentinel-2 and high-resolution images and during field research (accuracy: 95%). Our findings indicate that the Scarcies river estuary witnessed the greatest mangrove loss since 1990 (45%), while the Sierra Leone river estuary experienced mangrove gain over the last 26 years (22%). Overall, the Sierra Leone coast lost 25% of its mangroves between 1990 and 2016, with the lowest coverage in 2000, during the period of civil war (1991–2002). However, natural mangrove dynamics, as supported by field observations, indicate the potential for regeneration and sustainability under carefully constructed management strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Mangrove Ecosystems)
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