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Special Issue "Novel Optical Sensors for Biomedical Application"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Benjamin L. Miller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Rochester, USA
Interests: optical biosensors; integrated photonics; interferometry; photonic crystals; developing world diagnostics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to submit manuscripts for a Special Issue of the journal Sensors on “Novel Optical Sensors for Biomedical Applications”. The field of optical sensors has undergone rapid growth in recent years, with new concepts in miniaturization, multiplex analysis, photonic structures, and optically responsive materials appearing regularly. At the same time, the fields of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics are providing a wealth of new molecules to detect.

This Special Issue will highlight research focused on the development and use of new optical sensors for medical diagnostics, biomedical research, and related endeavors. Papers describing new optical diagnostics methods for point-of-care, field-use, and resource-limited applications are encouraged, as are those reporting novel assays, multiplex testing systems, “lab-on-a-chip” sensors, and spectroscopic methods. Both application-focused and fundamental contributions (with likely downstream applications in biomedicine) are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Benjamin L. Miller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical sensing
  • Point-of-care diagnostics
  • Developing world diagnostics
  • Integrated photonics for sensing
  • Plasmonics
  • Multiplex detection
  • Spectroscopy
  • Lab-on-a-chip devices

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Laser Resonance Frequency Analysis: A Novel Measurement Approach to Evaluate Acetabular Cup Stability During Surgery
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4876; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224876 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Artificial joint acetabular cup stability is essential for successful total hip arthroplasty. However, a quantitative evaluation approach for clinical use is lacking. We developed a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) system involving a laser system that is fully contactless. This study aimed to investigate [...] Read more.
Artificial joint acetabular cup stability is essential for successful total hip arthroplasty. However, a quantitative evaluation approach for clinical use is lacking. We developed a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) system involving a laser system that is fully contactless. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of laser RFA for evaluating acetabular cup stability. First, the finite element method was performed to determine the vibration mode for analysis. Second, the acetabular cup was press-fitted into a reamed polyurethane cavity that replicated the human acetabular roof. The implanted acetabular cup was vibrated with pulse laser irradiation and the induced vibration was detected with a laser Doppler vibrometer. The time domain signal from the vibrometer was analyzed by fast Fourier transform to obtain the vibration frequency spectrum. After laser RFA, the pull-down force of the acetabular cup was measured as conventional implant fixation strength. The frequency of the first highest amplitude between 2 kHz and 6 kHz was considered as the resonance peak frequency, and its relationship with the pull-down force was assessed. The peak frequency could predict the pull-down force (R2 = 0.859, p < 0.000). Our findings suggest that laser RFA might be useful to measure acetabular cup stability during surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Optical Sensors for Biomedical Application)
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