sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nélia J. Alberto
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Telecomunicações, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: optical fiber sensors; fiber Bragg gratings; fiber sensors applications; biosensing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Maria de Fátima Domingues
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Telecomunicações, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: optical fiber sensors; fiber Bragg gratings; Fabry-Perot interformetric sensors; eHealth applications; gait analysis; wearable sensing devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Paulo Antunes
Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
1. I3N & Physics Department, Aveiro University, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2. Instituto de Telecomunicações, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: optical fiber sensors; eHealth platforms; structural health monitoring
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical fiber technology is an interesting sensing methodology that has been explored in diverse application fields, including medicine and biomedical applications. It has been used to monitor important physiological parameters such as heart rate, arterial pulse waveform, and oximetry; to detect cancer biomarkers; and to characterize new medical materials; among several others. For all this, fiber-optic sensors for biomedical applications is a very active research area, where challenges concerning the miniaturization, sensitivity, selectivity, applicability, accuracy, and biocompatibility need to be thoroughly addressed.

This Special Issue will focus on the current state-of-the-art of optical fiber sensors for biomedicine, covering recent technological improvements in new devices/sensors and emerging applications. Both original research papers and review articles describing the current state-of-the-art in this research field are welcome. We hope that this SI will provide you with an overview of the present status and future outlook of the aforementioned topics. 

The manuscripts should cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Optical fiber sensing of physiological parameters;
  • New bio/chemical probes for medical applications;
  • Optical integrated biomedical systems (lab-on-a-fiber);
  • Optical fiber systems with microfluid integration;
  • Wearable biomedical sensors;
  • Non-invasive optical fiber devices;
  • Optical fiber sensors in e-Health architectures;
  • Energy-efficient eHealth architectures;
  • Big data analysis for eHealth;
  • Optical fiber sensors for rehabilitation;
  • Optical fiber immunosensors;
  • Biomarker detection;
  • Low-cost, miniaturized, selective, and multiparameter optical fiber devices;
  • Innovative materials for medical applications;
  • Advanced signal processing techniques;
  • Applications including but not limited to: dentistry, surgery, robotics, medical diagnostics and therapy, pharmaceutical research, and cardiovascular and chronic diseases.

Dr. Nélia J. Alberto
Dr. Maria de Fátima Domingues
Dr. Paulo Antunes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomedicine
  • Optical fiber sensors
  • Biomedical sensors
  • Lab-on-a-fiber
  • Wearable sensors
  • e-Health
  • Body-sensor network

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Combined Long-Period Fiber Grating and Microcavity In-Line Mach–Zehnder Interferometer for Refractive Index Measurements with Limited Cross-Sensitivity
Sensors 2020, 20(8), 2431; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20082431 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work discusses sensing properties of a long-period grating (LPG) and microcavity in-line Mach–Zehnder interferometer (µIMZI) when both are induced in the same single-mode optical fiber. LPGs were either etched or nanocoated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to increase its [...] Read more.
This work discusses sensing properties of a long-period grating (LPG) and microcavity in-line Mach–Zehnder interferometer (µIMZI) when both are induced in the same single-mode optical fiber. LPGs were either etched or nanocoated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to increase its refractive index (RI) sensitivity up to ≈2000 and 9000 nm/RIU, respectively. The µIMZI was machined using a femtosecond laser as a cylindrical cavity (d = 60 μm) in the center of the LPG. In transmission measurements for various RI in the cavity and around the LPG we observed two effects coming from the two independently working sensors. This dual operation had no significant impact on either of the devices in terms of their functional properties, especially in a lower RI range. Moreover, due to the properties of combined sensors two major effects can be distinguished—sensitivity to the RI of the volume and sensitivity to the RI at the surface. Considering also the negligible temperature sensitivity of the µIMZI, it makes the combination of LPG and µIMZI sensors a promising approach to limit cross-sensitivity or tackle simultaneous measurements of multiple effects with high efficiency and reliability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Performance Analysis of a Lower Limb Multi Joint Angle Sensor Using CYTOP Fiber: Influence of Light Source Wavelength and Angular Velocity Compensation
Sensors 2020, 20(2), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020326 - 07 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents the analysis of an intensity variation polymer optical fiber (POF)-based angle sensor performance, i.e., sensitivity, hysteresis and determination coefficient ( R 2 ), using cyclic transparent optical polymer (CYTOP) fiber. The analysis consisted of two approaches: influence of different light [...] Read more.
This paper presents the analysis of an intensity variation polymer optical fiber (POF)-based angle sensor performance, i.e., sensitivity, hysteresis and determination coefficient ( R 2 ), using cyclic transparent optical polymer (CYTOP) fiber. The analysis consisted of two approaches: influence of different light source central wavelengths (430 nm, 530 nm, 660 nm, 870 nm and 950 nm) and influence of different angular velocities ( 0.70 rad/s, 0.87 rad/s, 1.16 rad/s, 1.75 rad/s and 3.49 rad/s). The first approach aimed to select the source which resulted in the most suitable performance regarding highest sensitivity and linearity while maintaining lowest hysteresis, through the figure of merit. Thereafter, the analysis of different angular velocities was performed to evaluate the influence of velocity in the curvature sensor performance. Then, a discrete angular velocity compensation was proposed in order to reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of responses for different angular velocities. Ten tests for each analysis were performed with angular range of 0 to 50 , based on knee and ankle angle range during the gait. The curvature sensor was applied in patterns simulating the knee and ankle during the gait. Results show repeatability and the best sensor performance for λ = 950 nm in the first analysis and show high errors for high angular velocities ( w = 3.49 rad/s) in the second analysis, which presented up to 50 % angular error. The uncompensated RMSE was high for all velocities ( 6.45 to 12.41 ), whereas the compensated RMSE decreased up to 74 % ( 1.67 to 3.62 ). The compensated responses of application tests showed maximum error of 5.52 and minimum of 1.06 , presenting a decrease of mean angular error up to 30 when compared with uncompensated responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Detection of the Crystallization Process of Paracetamol with a Multi-Mode Optical Fiber in a Reflective Configuration
Sensors 2020, 20(1), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20010087 - 22 Dec 2019
Abstract
A configuration of a refractometer sensor is described with the aim of optically detecting the crystallization process of paracetamol. The developed sensing head is based on a conventional cleaved multi-mode fiber. The fiber tip sensor structure was submitted to contact with the liquid [...] Read more.
A configuration of a refractometer sensor is described with the aim of optically detecting the crystallization process of paracetamol. The developed sensing head is based on a conventional cleaved multi-mode fiber. The fiber tip sensor structure was submitted to contact with the liquid of interest (paracetamol fully dissolved in 40% v/v of ethanol/water) and the crystallization process of paracetamol, induced with continued exposure to air, was monitored in real time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
An Analytical Model for Describing the Power Coupling Ratio between Multimode Fibers with Transverse Displacement and Angular Misalignment in an Optical Fiber Bend Sensor
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4968; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224968 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
The power coupling ratio between step-index multimode fibers caused by combined transversal and angular misalignment is calculated. A theoretical description of the coupling efficiency between two optical fibers based on geometrical optics is provided. The theoretical calculations are collaborated by experiments, determining the [...] Read more.
The power coupling ratio between step-index multimode fibers caused by combined transversal and angular misalignment is calculated. A theoretical description of the coupling efficiency between two optical fibers based on geometrical optics is provided. The theoretical calculations are collaborated by experiments, determining the power coupling ratio between three output fibers with an axial offset and angular misalignment with a single input fiber. The calculation results are in good agreement with experimental results obtained using a previously fabricated optical fiber sensor for monitoring physiological parameters in clinical environments. The theoretical results are particularly beneficial for optimizing the design of optical fiber bending sensors that are based on power coupling loss (intensity) as the measurement interrogation requires either axial displacement, angular misalignment, or both. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High Rate Dynamic Monitoring with Fabry–Perot Interferometric Sensors: An Alternative Interrogation Technique Targeting Biomedical Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(21), 4744; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19214744 - 31 Oct 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Fabry–Perot interferometric (FPI) sensors are an accurate and well-established sensing technology that are used to monitor a wide range of parameters such as strain, temperature, and refractive index, among many others. Nevertheless, due to the limited number and high cost of existing interrogation [...] Read more.
Fabry–Perot interferometric (FPI) sensors are an accurate and well-established sensing technology that are used to monitor a wide range of parameters such as strain, temperature, and refractive index, among many others. Nevertheless, due to the limited number and high cost of existing interrogation techniques for FPIs, its use is often restricted to discrete measurements, not being so explored for dynamic applications. The development of an alternative interrogation technique for a high rate of acquisition may propel this type of sensor into less explored fields such as dynamic biomedical applications. In this work, we present the theoretical and experimental analyses of an FPI sensing architecture by using an alternative high rate dynamic acquisition methodology, based on frequency to amplitude conversion, where the FPI spectral shift is detuned by the convolution of the optical light source with the FPI interference pattern. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results verified the reliability of the proposed methodology. Moreover, preliminary results show that the developed sensing architecture can be a suitable solution to monitor biomedical parameters such as the carotid pulse wave. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors and Their Biomedical Applications
Sensors 2020, 20(7), 2113; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20072113 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The use of sensors in the real world is on the rise, providing information on medical diagnostics for healthcare and improving quality of life. Optical fiber sensors, as a result of their unique properties (small dimensions, capability of multiplexing, chemical inertness, and immunity [...] Read more.
The use of sensors in the real world is on the rise, providing information on medical diagnostics for healthcare and improving quality of life. Optical fiber sensors, as a result of their unique properties (small dimensions, capability of multiplexing, chemical inertness, and immunity to electromagnetic fields) have found wide applications, ranging from structural health monitoring to biomedical and point-of-care instrumentation. Furthermore, these sensors usually have good linearity, rapid response for real-time monitoring, and high sensitivity to external perturbations. Optical fiber sensors, thus, present several features that make them extremely attractive for a wide variety of applications, especially biomedical applications. This paper reviews achievements in the area of temperature optical fiber sensors, different configurations of the sensors reported over the last five years, and application of this technology in biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop