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Special Issue "Modern Radar Systems"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Piotr Samczynski
Website1 Website2 SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Politechnika Warszawska, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-661 Warszawa,Poland
Interests: SAR/ISAR; passive radars; passive SAR/ISAR; noise radars; radar signal processing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Daniel W. O'Hagan
Website
Guest Editor
Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR, Wachtberg, Germany
Interests: Passive Radar, Mulitstatic, Cooperative Bi-/Multi-Static Radar, MFRFS, Next Generation Waveforms, Platform Sychronisation
Prof. Dr. Jacek Misiurewicz
Website
Guest Editor
Politechnika Warszawska, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-661 Warszawa,Poland
Interests: compressed sensing in radar; nonuniform sampling problems; SAR/ISAR imaging; noise and PCL radar technology; radar resource management; track before detect techniques
Dr. Lorenzo Lo Monte
Website
Guest Editor
Telephonics
Interests: applied RF/radar/EW systems engineering; prototyping; teaching; consulting and research; esign of AESAs, microwave devices and signal processors; algorithm development for AMTI, ASW, ASuW, BMD, CCD, DMTI, EA, EP, EMW, ES, GMTI, GPR, ISAR, In-SAR, MIMO, MMTI, SAR, SAA, STAP

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, developments in radar have intensified, with an increasing convergence of active and passive technology applied in numerous fields. The development of radar was originally for military purposes; however, radar has recently become a prominent technology in a wide variety of civil applications, such as automotive radars, human detection and classification, ground-penetrating radars, and medical imaging radars, among others. In most radar applications, there is still a need for faster and more accurate signal processing methods to enhance detection, localization, tracking, data fusion, imaging, and target classification. Furthermore, there is greater demand for sophisticated system design so that radar functionality may operate in unison with other sensor techniques.  

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest research results in the area of modern radar technology utilizing active and/or passive radar sensor systems in different applications, including both military use and a broad spectrum of civilian applications. The contributions from leading experts in this field of research will be collected and presented in this Special Issue.  

This Special Issue aims to highlight the advances in modern radar systems. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Modern solutions in radar systems;
  • Deployable multiband passive/active radars;
  • New applications in passive radars;
  • New techniques in radar signal processing;
  • Waveform design techniques in radar applications;
  • Active and Passive SAR/ISAR imaging techniques;
  • Civilian applications of modern radar technology;
  • Radar signal and data processing;
  • Tracking and data fusion;
  • Multifunctional RF Systems (MFRFS);
  • Radar network synchronization;
  • Countermeasures to modern radar.
Dr. Piotr Samczynski
Dr. Daniel W. O'Hagan
Dr. Jacek Misiurewicz
Dr. Lorenzo Lo Monte
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Detection of Low RCS Supersonic Flying Targets with a High-Resolution MMW Radar
Sensors 2020, 20(11), 3284; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113284 - 09 Jun 2020
Abstract
In this study, the detection of a low radar cross-section (RCS) target moving at a very high speed using a high-resolution millimeter-wave radar is presented. This real-time detection is based on the transmission of a continuous wave and heterodyning of the received signal [...] Read more.
In this study, the detection of a low radar cross-section (RCS) target moving at a very high speed using a high-resolution millimeter-wave radar is presented. This real-time detection is based on the transmission of a continuous wave and heterodyning of the received signal reflected from the moving target. This type of detection enables one to extract the object’s movement characteristics, such as velocity and position, while in motion and also to extract its physical characteristics. In this paper, we describe the detection of a fired bullet using a radar operating at an extremely high-frequency band. This allowed us to employ a low sampling rate which enabled the use of inexpensive and straightforward equipment, including the use of small antennas that allow velocity detection at high resolution and with low atmospheric absorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Radar Systems)
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