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Marine Sensors: Recent Advances and Challenges, Volume II

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2023) | Viewed by 10410

Special Issue Editors


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1. CMEMS-University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães, Portugal
2. Department of Industrial Electronics, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: sensors; actuators; electronics
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INESC TEC, R. Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: underwater acoustic communications; underwater transducers; deep-sea sensing
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Mechanical Engineering Department, Minho University, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: biomicrofluidics; microcirculation; biofluid mechanics; blood-on-chips; conventional and confocal micro-PIV; nanofluids; energy and environment
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ocean has a huge impact on our way of life, and there is a need to monitor and protect its biodiversity. Additionally, the ocean’s industrial potential for health, minerals, and oil has promoted the need for constant and real-time monitoring. Taking advantage of the most recent progress in sensing techniques, the purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an opportunity for the engineering and biological marine community to exchange knowledge and information on the latest advances and challenges in marine sensors and their applications to sea environment monitoring. We hope to bring together researchers who are interested in the general field of sensors, especially in their applications in the sea.

In this Special Issue, we invite contributions (original research papers, review articles, and brief communications) that focus on the latest advances and challenges in marine sensors and related fields applied to marine sustainable development, in the following areas:

  • Physical sensors.
  • Chemical sensors.
  • Acoustic sensors.
  • Labs-on-chips.
  • Remote sensors.
  • Underwater Internet of Things.
  • MEMS.
  • Smart sensors.
  • As well as all other related areas concerning marine sensors.

Prof. Dr. Luís Miguel Goncalves
Dr. Marcos Martins
Dr. Rui A. Lima
Dr. Graça Minas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine sensing technologies
  • marine instrumentation
  • marine data communication
  • sensor networks
  • sea monitoring
  • sea modelling
  • remote sensing
  • sea pollution
  • energy harvesting
  • submersible power
  • submersible devices and equipment
  • submersible lab-on-chip devices
  • physical oceanography
  • biological oceanography
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2305 KiB  
Article
Design and In Situ Validation of Low-Cost and Easy to Apply Anti-Biofouling Techniques for Oceanographic Continuous Monitoring with Optical Instruments
by Tiago Matos, Vânia Pinto, Paulo Sousa, Marcos Martins, Emilio Fernández, Renato Henriques and Luis Miguel Gonçalves
Sensors 2023, 23(2), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23020605 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2104
Abstract
Biofouling is the major factor that limits long-term monitoring studies with automated optical instruments. Protection of the sensing areas, surfaces, and structural housing of the sensors must be considered to deliver reliable data without the need for cleaning or maintenance. In this work, [...] Read more.
Biofouling is the major factor that limits long-term monitoring studies with automated optical instruments. Protection of the sensing areas, surfaces, and structural housing of the sensors must be considered to deliver reliable data without the need for cleaning or maintenance. In this work, we present the design and field validation of different techniques for biofouling protection based on different housing materials, biocides, and transparent coatings. Six optical turbidity probes were built using polylactic acid (PLA), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), PLA with copper filament, ABS coated with PDMS, ABS coated with epoxy and ABS assembled with a system for in situ chlorine production. The probes were deployed in the sea for 48 days and their anti-biofouling efficiency was evaluated using the results of the field experiment, visual inspections, and calibration signal loss after the tests. The PLA and ABS were used as samplers without fouling protection. The probe with chlorine production outperformed the other techniques, providing reliable data during the in situ experiment. The copper probe had lower performance but still retarded the biological growth. The techniques based on transparent coatings, epoxy, and PDMS did not prevent biofilm formation and suffered mostly from micro-biofouling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sensors: Recent Advances and Challenges, Volume II)
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17 pages, 5342 KiB  
Article
In Situ Measurements of Plankton Biorhythms Using Submersible Holographic Camera
by Victor Dyomin, Alexandra Davydova, Nikolay Kirillov, Sergey Morgalev, Elena Naumova, Alexey Olshukov and Igor Polovtsev
Sensors 2022, 22(17), 6674; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22176674 - 3 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1637
Abstract
The paper presents a diagnostic complex for plankton studies using the miniDHC (digital holographic camera). Its capabilities to study the rhythmic processes in plankton ecosystems were demonstrated using the natural testing in Lake Baikal in summer. The results of in situ measurements of [...] Read more.
The paper presents a diagnostic complex for plankton studies using the miniDHC (digital holographic camera). Its capabilities to study the rhythmic processes in plankton ecosystems were demonstrated using the natural testing in Lake Baikal in summer. The results of in situ measurements of plankton to detect the synchronization of collective biological rhythms with medium parameters are presented and interpreted. The most significant rhythms in terms of the correlation of their parameters with medium factors are identified. The study shows that the correlation with water temperature at the mooring site has the greatest significance and reliability. The results are verified with biodiversity data obtained by the traditional mesh method. The experience and results of the study can be used for the construction of a stationary station to monitor the ecological state of the water area through the digitalization of plankton behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sensors: Recent Advances and Challenges, Volume II)
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Review

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24 pages, 15240 KiB  
Review
A Complex of Marine Geophysical Methods for Studying Gas Emission Process on the Arctic Shelf
by Artem A. Krylov, Roman A. Ananiev, Denis V. Chernykh, Dmitry A. Alekseev, Ermolay I. Balikhin, Nikolay N. Dmitrevsky, Mikhail A. Novikov, Elena A. Radiuk, Anna V. Domaniuk, Sergey A. Kovachev, Georgy K. Timashkevich, Vladimir N. Ivanov, Dmitry A. Ilinsky, Oleg Yu. Ganzha, Alexey Yu. Gunar, Pavel Yu. Pushkarev, Andrey V. Koshurnikov, Leopold I. Lobkovsky and Igor P. Semiletov
Sensors 2023, 23(8), 3872; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23083872 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2789
Abstract
The Russian sector of the arctic shelf is the longest in the world. Quite a lot of places of massive discharge of bubble methane from the seabed into the water column and further into the atmosphere were found there. This natural phenomenon requires [...] Read more.
The Russian sector of the arctic shelf is the longest in the world. Quite a lot of places of massive discharge of bubble methane from the seabed into the water column and further into the atmosphere were found there. This natural phenomenon requires an extensive complex of geological, biological, geophysical, and chemical studies. This article is devoted to aspects of the use of a complex of marine geophysical equipment applied in the Russian sector of the arctic shelf for the detection and study of areas of the water and sedimentary strata with increased saturation with natural gases, as well as a description of some of the results obtained. This complex contains a single-beam scientific high-frequency echo sounder and multibeam system, a sub-bottom profiler, ocean-bottom seismographs, and equipment for continuous seismoacoustic profiling and electrical exploration. The experience of using the above equipment and the examples of the results obtained in the Laptev Sea have shown that these marine geophysical methods are effective and of particular importance for solving most problems related to the detection, mapping, quantification, and monitoring of underwater gas release from the bottom sediments of the shelf zone of the arctic seas, as well as the study of upper and deeper geological roots of gas emission and their relationship with tectonic processes. Geophysical surveys have a significant performance advantage compared to any contact methods. The large-scale application of a wide range of marine geophysical methods is essential for a comprehensive study of the geohazards of vast shelf zones, which have significant potential for economic use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sensors: Recent Advances and Challenges, Volume II)
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Other

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13 pages, 7601 KiB  
Concept Paper
Feasibility Study for the Development of a Low-Cost, Compact, and Fast Sensor for the Detection and Classification of Microplastics in the Marine Environment
by Bruno Cocciaro, Silvia Merlino, Marco Bianucci, Claudio Casani and Vincenzo Palleschi
Sensors 2023, 23(8), 4097; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23084097 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2724
Abstract
The detection and classification of microplastics in the marine environment is a complex task that implies the use of delicate and expensive instrumentation. In this paper, we present a preliminary feasibility study for the development of a low-cost, compact microplastics sensor that could [...] Read more.
The detection and classification of microplastics in the marine environment is a complex task that implies the use of delicate and expensive instrumentation. In this paper, we present a preliminary feasibility study for the development of a low-cost, compact microplastics sensor that could be mounted, in principle, on a float of drifters, for the monitoring of large marine surfaces. The preliminary results of the study indicate that a simple sensor equipped with three infrared-sensitive photodiodes can reach classification accuracies around 90% for the most-diffused floating microplastics in the marine environment (polyethylene and polypropylene). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sensors: Recent Advances and Challenges, Volume II)
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