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Special Issue "IoT-Enabled Smart Cities"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Networks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luis Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Communications Engineering, University of Cantabria, 39005 Cantabria, Spain
Interests: Internet of Things; Smart Cities; wireless communications; cloud/edge computing; semantics
Dr. Martin Bauer
Website
Guest Editor
NEC Laboratories Europe, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany
Interests: Internet of Things; Smart Cities; ubiquitous computing; context management; cloud/edge computing, semantics
Dr. JaeSeung Song
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer and Information Security, Sejong University, 15600 Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: Internet of Things; Smart Cities; software testing; cloud/edge computing; semantics; blockchain; artificial intelligence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the evolution of Internet of Things (IoT) technology, the vision of a Smart City is starting to become a reality. The goal of a Smart City is to establish a wealthy ecosystem where the operation of the city is optimized, increasing its efficiency, but also where new opportunities arise and improve the life of its citizens. In contrast to other IoT domains, the Smart City is an agglomeration of many different application areas, including traffic, public transportation, parking, water, energy, waste management, street lighting, public safety, and many more. To support all these application areas, infrastructure has to be deployed in order to enable sensing important parameters of the city, but also for controlling and actuating aspects. The true value of IoT in the Smart City will be achieved if infrastructure is not limited to silos but is made available across different application areas in a homogeneous and resilient manner. The biggest challenges lie in the integration of the heterogeneous underlying IoT technologies and achieving the required scalability and security so that information, even personal and/or critical, can be exchanged among authorized actors and protected from illicit access. Moreover, higher level knowledge shall be extracted, giving insights that help in optimizing the operation of the city and quality of life of its citizens. Finally, mechanisms to track the provenance, quality, and value of the information that is exchanged have to be in place in order to allow trading operations where the raw material is precisely the data that fuel the Smart City services.

The Special Issue aims to present high-quality research and recent technology advances towards IoT-enabled Smart Cities. Relevant topics include all aspects of IoT systems in the city domain. Sensing of and actuation on aspects of the physical world provide the basis; sensor networks communicate and initially process sensor data. IoT architectures integrate sensor networks and support processing and control loops on the edge and in the cloud. Security and data quality schemes enable resilient data exchange. Raw data are processed to become information; information is combined and knowledge extracted, enabling the understanding of current and the prediction of future situations. Applications in different domains utilize this understanding to efficiently react in real time, or analyze past situations to improve future behavior.

You are invited to submit original papers that present significant advances of the state of the art regarding IoT-enabled Smart Cities, including but not limited to the following topics:

  • Sensor networks for Smart City infrastructure monitoring
  • IoT for mission-critical infrastructures of the Smart City
  • Edge/Cloud IoT architecture
  • Knowledge extraction using machine learning
  • Crowd estimation and mobility management
  • Semantic modeling of city knowledge
  • Digital twin for the Smart City
  • Blockchain technology applied to IoT-enabled Smart City
  • IoT-enabled circular and collaborative economy in the Smart City
  • Monetization and business models for Smart City data
  • Application, deployment, testbed and experiments in the Smart City
  • Standardization related to the Smart City

Dr. Luis Sánchez
Dr. Martin Bauer
Dr. JaeSeung Song
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Short-Term Rental Forecast of Urban Public Bicycle Based on the HOSVD-LSTM Model in Smart City
Sensors 2020, 20(11), 3072; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113072 - 29 May 2020
Abstract
As a kind of transportation in a smart city, urban public bicycles have been adopted by major cities and bear the heavy responsibility of the “last mile” of urban public transportation. At present, the main problem of the urban public bicycle system is [...] Read more.
As a kind of transportation in a smart city, urban public bicycles have been adopted by major cities and bear the heavy responsibility of the “last mile” of urban public transportation. At present, the main problem of the urban public bicycle system is that it is difficult for users to rent a bike during peak h, and real-time monitoring cannot be solved adequately. Therefore, predicting the demand for bicycles in a certain period and performing redistribution in advance is of great significance for solving the lag of bicycle system scheduling with the help of IoT. Based on the HOSVD-LSTM prediction model, a prediction model of urban public bicycles based on the hybrid model is proposed by transforming the source data (multiple time series) into a high-order tensor time series. Furthermore, it uses the tensor decomposition technology (HOSVD decomposition) to extract new features (kernel tenor) from higher-order tensors. At the same time, these kernel tenors are directly used to train tensor LSTM models to obtain new kernel tenors. The inverse tensor decomposition and high-dimensional, multidimensional, and tensor dimensionality reduction were introduced. The new kernel tenor obtains the predicted value of the source sequence. Then the bicycle rental amount is predicted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IoT-Enabled Smart Cities)
Open AccessArticle
Building Dynamic Communities of Interest for Internet of Things in Smart Cities
Sensors 2020, 20(10), 2986; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20102986 - 25 May 2020
Abstract
The Internet of things (IoT) is a growing area of research in the context of smart cities. It links a city’s physical objects that are equipped with embedded sensing, communicating, and computing technology. These objects possess the capability to connect and share data [...] Read more.
The Internet of things (IoT) is a growing area of research in the context of smart cities. It links a city’s physical objects that are equipped with embedded sensing, communicating, and computing technology. These objects possess the capability to connect and share data with minimal human intervention, which creates the potential to establish social relationships among them. However, it is challenging for an object to discover, communicate, and collaborate dynamically with other objects, such as social entities, and provide services to humans. This is due to the increase in the number of objects and the complexity in defining social-like relationships among them. The current research aims to address this by introducing an object architecture and defining a Dynamic Community of Interest Model (DCIM) for IoT objects. The proposed model will help IoT objects to socialize and build communities amongst themselves based on different criteria. In this approach, objects belonging to a community will collaborate with each other to collect, manipulate, and share interesting content and provide services to enhance the quality of human interactions in smart cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IoT-Enabled Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
An Efficient and Secure Alert System for VANETs to Improve Crosswalks’ Security in Smart Cities
Sensors 2020, 20(9), 2473; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20092473 - 27 Apr 2020
Abstract
A key characteristic of Smart Cities is the ability to reduce conflicts between different agents coexisting in a dynamic system, such as the interaction between vehicles and pedestrians. This paper presents a system to augment the awareness of vehicle drivers regarding the presence [...] Read more.
A key characteristic of Smart Cities is the ability to reduce conflicts between different agents coexisting in a dynamic system, such as the interaction between vehicles and pedestrians. This paper presents a system to augment the awareness of vehicle drivers regarding the presence of pedestrians in nearby crosswalks. The proposed system interconnects Road Side Units (RSUs), which are informed about the state of the crosswalks, and vehicles, in order to spread to vehicles, the information about the presence of pedestrians in crosswalks. To prevent false information spreading, RSUs sign the alert messages they broadcast and all vehicles can validate the signatures. This poses strong security requirements, such as non-repudiation of alert messages, as well as strong real-time requirements, such as minimum message validation delays among vehicles approaching a crosswalk of interest. To manage the signed alert messages, we are proposing Nimble Asymmetric Cryptography (NAC), which authenticates implicit broadcast messages. NAC minimizes the usage of asymmetric ciphers, which are fundamental to assure non-repudiation but increase performance penalties and uses hash chaining for source authentication of implicit messages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IoT-Enabled Smart Cities)
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