Special Issue "Circular Use of Resources - Theoretical and Practical Approaches of Sustainable Technologies, Business Models and Organizational Innovations"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Csaba Fogarassy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Climate Change Economics Research Centre, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Szent Istvan University, 2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
Tel. +36302021623
Interests: Bioeconomy; Business Administration; Business Model Innovation; Circular Economy; Environmental Economics; Environmental Engineering Renewable Energy; Sharing economy; Sustainable Innovations; Transition management
Prof. Dr. József Popp
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sectoral Economics and Methodology, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Debrecen, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
Interests: agricultural economics; bioenergy; climate change; food security; circular economy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. David Christian Finger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland
Interests: environmental science earth and planetary sciences; agricultural and biological sciences; social sciences; sustainable engineering; circular innovations; alternative energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Circular solutions are essential to tackle the eminent challenges of depleting resources and emerging environmental problems. The complex nature of material and energy systems and the changing economic and technological conditions are different among the EU member states as a result of the introduction and application of very different practices in developed and rapidly developing countries of the world. A wide variety of theoretical approaches can be used to facilitate a shift from the linear use of resources to circular systems, e.g., circular product planning, zero waste management, service-based repairing, refurbishing, and remanufacturing; to name just a few. The introduction and examination of circular solutions can be based on theoretical models in order to guarantee ensure successful application. Successful application of innovative technology approaches, business solutions, and organizational development can be facilitated through theoretical models and new scientific results that support innovation processes.

This Special Issue focuses on sustainable and innovative methods which help and enable the proper use and recovery of resources. Research papers, reviews, short communications, and case studies that introduce or discuss circular solutions for a sustainable use of resources are welcomed. In particular, we encourage the submission of papers on circular manufacturing, sustainable digitalization, platform sharing, up- and down cycling, reusing, refurbishing, leasing, servicing, loaning, and capacity sharing.

The following papers are examples of the scope of the Special Issue:

Horvath, B.; Mallinguh, E.; Fogarassy, C. Designing Business Solutions for Plastic Waste Management to Enhance Circular Transitions in Kenya. Sustainability 2018, 10, 1664.

Fogarassy, C.; Neubauer, E.; Mansur, H.; Tangl, A.; Oláh, J.; Popp, J. The main transition management issues and the effects of environmental accounting on financial performance – with focus on cement industry. Administratie si Management Public 2018, (31), pp. 52-66.

Horvath, B.; Khazami, N.; Ymeri, P.; Fogarassy, C. Investigating the Current Business Model Innovation Trends in the Biotechnology Industry. JBEM 2019, 20, 63-85.

Prof. Dr. József Popp
Dr. Csaba Fogarassy
Dr. David Christian Finger
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological loops
  • business model application
  • circular innovation
  • circular manufacturing
  • closed loop energy system
  • environmental engineering
  • industrial circulation
  • renewable energy management
  • resource management
  • service-based economy
  • sharing economy
  • sharing platforms
  • sustainable digitalization
  • technological cycles
  • water management

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Example of a German Free-Float Car-Sharing Company Expansion in East-Central Europe
Resources 2019, 8(4), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8040172 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
This study examines the expansion of a German free-float car-sharing company in Hungary from financial and sustainability perspectives. BMW and Daimler recently created the joint ventures ShareNow, ChargeNow, ReachNow, FreeNow, and ParkNow, which are having a significant global impact, as their services are [...] Read more.
This study examines the expansion of a German free-float car-sharing company in Hungary from financial and sustainability perspectives. BMW and Daimler recently created the joint ventures ShareNow, ChargeNow, ReachNow, FreeNow, and ParkNow, which are having a significant global impact, as their services are now available in 14 different countries. We also expect further market development, since ShareNow started to operate in Hungary in May 2019. The whole EU market is just one step away from being covered by the same professional service, and the future might bring a real globally available free-float car-sharing service provider. Our review used a combination of two methodologies: financial statement-based business analysis and sustainability analysis. On the basis of this study, we concluded that these companies are primarily operated for profit and not on a sustainable operation basis. Additionally, it was also found that the current statistical data collection method does not measure precisely these activities. Financial reporting and sustainability reporting are connected, but they cover different areas. As a subject of further research, we suggest examining whether it is possible to establish a clear connection between these methodologies in the foreseeable future. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Circular Economy and its Comparison with 14 Other Business Sustainability Movements
Resources 2019, 8(4), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8040159 - 25 Sep 2019
Abstract
Circular economy is not the first, and probably not the last “movement” in the arena of sustainability macroeconomic and business solutions. In this article we produce a—not full—list of similar movements from the 1990s, publish a comparative table and propose a simple framework [...] Read more.
Circular economy is not the first, and probably not the last “movement” in the arena of sustainability macroeconomic and business solutions. In this article we produce a—not full—list of similar movements from the 1990s, publish a comparative table and propose a simple framework to decide the significant points of the life cycle of such a kind of movement. For significant points and statistics, we use simplified content analysis from normal and scientific research engines. Finally, we use this framework to make a forecast about time for the circular economy approach “to stay on the top” and conclude if these movements are “Much Ado about Nothing” or they help us on our way to a sustainable planetary, social and economic system. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Differences, Constraints and Key Elements of Providing Local Sharing Economy Services in Different-Sized Cities: A Hungarian Case
Resources 2019, 8(3), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8030147 - 17 Aug 2019
Abstract
The business models of sharing economy services can differ from each other in different-sized cities. This paper provides a deeper understanding of the implementation of locally operating services for car, bicycle and office sharing in the urban environment. Our goal is to reveal [...] Read more.
The business models of sharing economy services can differ from each other in different-sized cities. This paper provides a deeper understanding of the implementation of locally operating services for car, bicycle and office sharing in the urban environment. Our goal is to reveal the differences between the capital city and an economically well-developed city in order to provide beneficial findings to the development of the presently operating services, or to the possible implementation of future services. Methodology of the paper applies the Business Model Canvas approach (BMC). We introduce a comparative analysis using data from the Hungarian database, which records details of all the publicly visible sharing economy services countrywide. The results show that BMC can reflect the main differences, constraints and key elements in the business models of sharing economy services. We can say that, in the case of a bike sharing service operated in the non-capital city, there is more segmentation than seen in the same service in the capital. There are significant price differences, especially in the case of long-term tickets. The number of inhabitants and private capital remain the biggest constraints in the case of car-sharing services, but there is also a possibility of implementation in the non-capital cities by applying small-scale services with a good value proposition and segmentation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Examination of Short Supply Chains Based on Circular Economy and Sustainability Aspects
Resources 2019, 8(4), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8040161 - 26 Sep 2019
Abstract
The sustainability of global food chains and intense agricultural production has become questionable. At the same time, the consumers’ interest in short supply chains (SSCs) and direct sales from producers has increased. SSCs are connected to sustainability by researchers. Their (supposed) positive sustainability [...] Read more.
The sustainability of global food chains and intense agricultural production has become questionable. At the same time, the consumers’ interest in short supply chains (SSCs) and direct sales from producers has increased. SSCs are connected to sustainability by researchers. Their (supposed) positive sustainability attributes are based mostly on extensive production methods and short transport distances. However, from other points of view, the economic and environmental sustainability of the short chains is questionable. Our research aims to cast light on the SSCs’ role in circular economy and sustainability. By deep literature review and content analysis, we determine the sustainability aspects of short (local) chains and their effects related to economy and environment. Short supply chains are connected most widely to circularity and sustainability by the subjects of environmental burden (transport, production method, emission), health, food quality, consumers’ behavior, producer-consumer relationships, and local economy. According to our experience, these factors cannot be generalised across all kinds of short chains. Their circular economic and sustainability features are dependent on their spatial location, type, and individual attitudes of the involved consumers and producers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title:The Life Cycle of Circular Economy – prediction of new economic direction
Author:
Toth, G.
Abstract:
Circular economy is not the first, and probably not the last „movement” in the arena of sustainability macroeconomic and business solutions. In this article we produce a – not full – list of similar movements from the 1990-s, publish a comparative table and propose a simple framework to decide the significant points of the life cycle of such a kind of movement. For significant points and statistics we use simplified content analysis from normal and scientific research engines. Finally we use this framework to make a forecast about time for the circular economy approach “to stay on the top”, and conclude if these movements are “Much Ado about Nothing” or they help us on our way to a sustainable planetary, social and economic system.

Title:Improving the material efficiency of the thermochemical cycle and increasing the quality of the gas produced in fixed bed pyrolysis equipment
Authors:
Fogarassy, Cs. and Toth L.
Abstract: Pyrolysis is a thermochemical process consisting of the degradation of organic polymers and biomass minerals in lignocellulose materials. At slow pyrolysis (300-400 ° C), the aim is to produce carbon during the reaction time. Rapid pyrolysis takes place at temperatures between 500 and 650 ° C. If the final product is gaseous, the temperature is higher than 700 ° C. The pyrolysis generator can be combined with a small power plant (CHP), the practical use of which is proving to be a promising technology, because the unit can be installed directly near the biomass production, and electricity can be fed decentrally to the public utility network, while there are several possibilities for using waste heat locally. Carbonaceous ash can be utilized well in the agricultural field, because in areas with intensive farming, the soil suffers from carbon and mineral deficiencies, and the phenomenon of material defect can be reduced by a higher level of implementation. Our aim was to improve the quality of the produced gas by increasing the efficiency of the planned equipment. These were primarily intended to be achieved by more accurate dimensioning of the main parts of the gas reactor, and by a more convenient design of the oxidation and reduction zones. On the basis of the test results, in the case of the heat released, the use of waste heat was solved within the system.

Title: Examination of short supply chains based on circular economy aspects
Authors: Kiss, K. -  Szalai, M. - Takacs-Gyorgy, K.
Abstract: The sustainability of global food chains and intense agricultural production became questionable for todays. At the same time, the consumers’ interest in short supply chains (SSC) and direct sale from consumers, is increased.  SSCs are connected to sustainability by researchers. It is based mostly on extensive production methods and short transport distances. However, from other points of view, the economic and environmental sustainability of the short chains is questionable. Our research aims to cast light on the SSCs’ role in circular economy. By deep literature review and content analysis, we determine the sustainability aspects of short (local) chains and their effects related to economy and environment. Short supply chains are connected most widely to circularity and sustainability by the subjects of environmental burden (transport, production method, emission), healthy, food quality, consumers’ behaviour, producer-consumer relationships, local economy. According to our experience, these factors can not be generalised on all kind of short chains. Their circular economic features is dependent on their spatial location, type, and individual attitudes of the involved consumers and producers.

Back to TopTop