Special Issue "Moving Forward on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Viviane V. Menezes

Guest Editor
Physical Oceanography Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 266 Woods Hole Road, MS 21, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
Interests: ocean salinity; Indian Ocean circulation; Antarctic bottom water

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to announce that we are organizing a Special Issue on the Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) in the Remote Sensing journal of MDPI. In the last ten years, much has been accomplished through SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP missions. However, challenges in the remote sensing of sea surface salinity still persist, especially in cold-water, coastal, and continental shelf regions across the globe. In addition, the link between satellite SSS and the hydrological cycle, which inspired the first studies in remote sensing of salinity, has not been fully explored to date in both regional and global scales. In this Special Issue, we welcome papers exploring all these areas in remote sensing of salinity, especially papers focusing on SSS variability in high latitudes.

The topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Investigations of SSS variability using satellite(s) and in situ observations in high latitudes, e.g., in the Arctic, Sub-polar North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean;
  • Evaluation of remote sensing products from SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP in multiple scales against in situ observations, especially from cutting-edge technologies such as sail-drones;
  • Sea surface salinity studies in coastal and continental shelf areas based on satellite(s) and in situ observations;
  • Synergistic use of satellite SSS, in situ observations, and other satellite-based products to obtain a better understanding of the hydrological cycle (both local and global scales);
  • Effects of rain on satellite salinity retrieval;
  • Improvements of salinity products in cold waters, coastal, and continental shelf regions;
  • New technologies, algorithms, and studies that aim to enhance SSS remote sensing capabilities.

Dr. Viviane V. Menezes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SMAP
  • SMOS
  • Aquarius
  • Artic
  • Southern Ocean
  • Sub-polar North Atlantic
  • cold water
  • coastal region
  • continental shelf

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Variability and Uncertainty of Satellite Sea Surface Salinity in the Subpolar North Atlantic (2010–2019)
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(13), 2092; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12132092 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Satellite remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the recent decade (2010–2019) has proven the capability of L-band (1.4 GHz) measurements to resolve SSS spatiotemporal variability in the tropical and subtropical oceans. However, the fidelity of SSS retrievals in cold waters at [...] Read more.
Satellite remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the recent decade (2010–2019) has proven the capability of L-band (1.4 GHz) measurements to resolve SSS spatiotemporal variability in the tropical and subtropical oceans. However, the fidelity of SSS retrievals in cold waters at mid-high latitudes has yet to be established. Here, four SSS products derived from two satellite missions were evaluated in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean in reference to two in situ gridded products. Harmonic analysis of annual and semiannual cycles in in situ products revealed that seasonal variations of SSS are dominated by an annual cycle, with a maximum in March and a minimum in September. The annual amplitudes are larger (>0.3 practical salinity scale (pss)) in the western basin where surface waters are colder and fresher, and weaker (~0.06 pss) in the eastern basin where surface waters are warmer and saltier. Satellite SSS products have difficulty producing the right annual cycle, particularly in the Labrador/Irminger seas where the SSS seasonality is dictated by the influx of Arctic low-salinity waters along the boundary currents. The study also found that there are basin-scale, time-varying drifts in the decade-long SMOS data records, which need to be corrected before the datasets can be used for studying climate variability of SSS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Moving Forward on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity)
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