Special Issue "Remote Sensing and Geospatial Approaches for Landscape Ecology"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nicola Clerici
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biology Program, Faculty of Natural Sciences and MathematicsUniversidad del Rosario, Kr 26 No 63B-48, Bogotá D.C., Colombia
Interests: landscape ecology; remote sensing, ecosystem services mapping; ecological disturbances; land use change impacts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landscape ecology focuses on the analysis of spatial patterns to investigate how altered landscapes affect ecological processes. Remote sensing technologies provide fundamental tools and data to this scientific discipline, largely due to the strong spatial component of its analyses. Optical and radar remote sensing imagery supply key information to map spatially explicit variables that can be processed and analyzed using different geospatial approaches. This strong link is gaining importance in applied ecological research, due to expanding global environmental change processes, such as biodiversity loss and land use change.

This open access Special Issue invites research papers describing cutting-edge research on the application of remote sensing technologies from any platform (satellite, aircraft, drones, etc.) to the study of landscape ecology problems. Possible topics include, but are not restricted to: mapping of landscape processes under change dynamics, methods for monitoring ecosystem processes, effects of scale on monitoring landscape properties, novel remote sensing data, and approaches for socio-ecological landscape assessment. Research that integrates active with passive remote sensing approaches is also relevant.

Prof. Nicola Clerici
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Landscape structure
  • Land-Cover/Land-Use Change
  • Landscape assessment
  • Fragmentation
  • Connectivity
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Deforestation
  • Biodiversity mapping
  • Environmental Change
  • Land degradation
  • Scale
  • Geospatial approaches

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Land Cover Trends in South Texas (1987–2050): Potential Implications for Wild Felids
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(4), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12040659 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1150
Abstract
The Rio Grande Delta and surrounding rangelands in Texas has become one of the fastest urbanizing regions in the United States over the last 35 years. We assessed how land cover trends contributed to the large-scale processes that have driven land cover change [...] Read more.
The Rio Grande Delta and surrounding rangelands in Texas has become one of the fastest urbanizing regions in the United States over the last 35 years. We assessed how land cover trends contributed to the large-scale processes that have driven land cover change since 1987. We classified LANDSAT imagery from 1987 to 2016 to quantify different rates of land cover change and used housing density scenarios to project changes in the amount and spatial distribution of woody cover until 2050 and its potential impact on wild felid habitat. Since 1987, woody cover increased from 3.9% along with patch and edge density, whereas mean patch area and Euclidean nearest neighbor decreased. Closer inspection revealed that woody encroachment of small patches (<1 ha) was the leading cause of woody cover increase by a magnitude of 4, with an observed significant skewness and kurtosis in the frequency distribution of patch size across years. By 2050, urbanization will be the dominant landscape type and at least 200 km2 of woody cover may be lost, thereby affecting felid populations in South Texas. These results provide important information for predicting future woody cover fragmentation and its potential impact on the connectivity of wild felid populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing and Geospatial Approaches for Landscape Ecology)
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Article
The Socio-Economic and Environmental Variables Associated with Hotspots of Infrastructure Expansion in South America
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(1), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12010116 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1113
Abstract
The built environment, defined as all human-made infrastructure, is increasing to fulfill the demand for human settlements, productive systems, mining, and industries. Due to the profound direct and indirect impacts that the built environment produces on natural ecosystems, it is considered a major [...] Read more.
The built environment, defined as all human-made infrastructure, is increasing to fulfill the demand for human settlements, productive systems, mining, and industries. Due to the profound direct and indirect impacts that the built environment produces on natural ecosystems, it is considered a major driver of land change and biodiversity loss, and a major component of global environmental change. In South America, a global producer of minerals and agricultural commodities, and a region with many biodiversity hotspots, infrastructure expanded considerably between 2001 and 2011. This expansion occurred mainly in rural areas, towns, and sprawling suburban areas that were not previously developed. Herein, we characterized the areas of major infrastructure expansion between 2001 and 2011 in South America. We used nighttime light data, land use maps, and socio-economic and environmental variables to answer the following questions: (1) Where are the hotspots of infrastructure expansion located? and (2) What combination of socio-economic and environmental variables are associated with infrastructure expansion? Hotspots of infrastructure expansion encompass 70% (337,310 km2) of the total infrastructure expansion occurring between 2001 and 2011 across South America. Urban population and economic growth, mean elevation, and mean road density were the main variables associated with the hotspots, grouping them into eight clusters. Furthermore, within the hotspots, woody vegetation increased around various urban centers, and several areas showed a large increase in agriculture. Investments in large scale infrastructure projects, and the expansion and intensification of productive systems (e.g., agriculture and meat production) play a dominant role in the increase of infrastructure across South America. We expect that under the current trends of globalization and land changes, infrastructure will continue increasing and expanding into no-development areas and remote places. Therefore, to fully understand the direct and indirect impacts of land use change in natural ecosystems studies of infrastructure need to expand to areas beyond cities. This will provide better land management alternatives for the conservation of biodiversity as well as peri-urban areas across South America. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing and Geospatial Approaches for Landscape Ecology)
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