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Integration of Space and In-Situ Earth Observing Methodologies for Environmental and Territory Monitoring

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2024) | Viewed by 3116

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, National Research Council of Italy, C.da Santa Loja, I-85050 Tito, PZ, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; electromagnetic sensing technologies; tomography; geohazards monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA), Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Naples, Italy
Interests: electromagnetic scattering; radar imaging; ground penetrating radar; data integration; non-invasive monitoring tools
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, National Research Council (IMAA/CNR), 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: remote sensing; satellite monitoring; renewable energy; geospatial data
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the Earth System Science community has strongly emphasized the rapid change in many global socio-economic indicators and Earth Physical trends; this effect became known as “The Great Acceleration” (International Geosphere–Biosphere Programme). Study of the magnitude and rate of these changes, and their impacts on environmental and human systems, is a priority for a large community of scientists.

To approach the scientific challenge associated with the “Great Acceleration” phenomena, full integration of the best available Earth-observing methodologies is necessary, integrating satellite remote sensing and in situ data for environmental and territory (urban areas and infrastructure) monitoring and modeling. According to the Copernicus program, the concept of in situ data is intended to spread much wider and include physical observations and geospatial information.

This Special Issue is intended as an effective tool to promote and share methodological approaches and novel applications based on the integration of Earth observation methodologies for studying and monitoring a large variety of environmental processes and their inter-relation with man-made structures. In this perspective, for example, the challenges deriving from renewable energy sources, as well as the storage of energy, in systems such as pumped hydro-energy storage (PHES), is attracting ever-increasing interest in the environmental challenges that must be studied.

This Special Issue is an opportunity to promote the results of novel applications for environmental monitoring based on the full integration of multi-source, multi-sensor, and multi-resolution Earth observation methodologies. Furthermore, new applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning methodologies for data processing and analysis are welcomed.

Finally, we encourage the submission of papers focused on the study of complex and challenging environmental problems with large impacts on society and the quality of people’s life.

The main topics of the Special Issue are:

  • Modelling and inversion;
  • AI-based applications and machine learning;
  • Digital twins of the environmental.
  • Climate change and extreme events;
  • Geohazard assessment and monitoring;
  • Water management and monitoring;
  • Urban management and monitoring;
  • Infrastructures and territory monitoring and surveillance;
  • Georesource management and monitoring;
  • Renewable energy resource management and monitoring.

Dr. Vincenzo Lapenna
Dr. Francesco Soldovieri
Dr. Edoardo Geraldi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • satellite remote sensing
  • airborne and UAV remote sensing
  • in situ networks
  • geophysical surface and subsurface sensing
  • geospatial data
  • machine learning
  • environmental monitoring
  • geoResources and GeoEnergy
  • renewable energy (solar, wind, and hydro)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

29 pages, 10861 KiB  
Article
An Integrated Geophysical and Unmanned Aerial Systems Surveys for Multi-Sensory, Multi-Scale and Multi-Resolution Cave Detection: The Gravaglione Site (Canale di Pirro Polje, Apulia)
by Gerardo Romano, Luigi Capozzoli, Nicodemo Abate, Michele De Girolamo, Isabella Serena Liso, Domenico Patella and Mario Parise
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(15), 3820; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15153820 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1397
Abstract
Gravaglione represents one of the main swallow holes of the Canale di Pirro, low Murge, Apulia region, Italy. Here, after an intense rainstorm, a huge volume of rainwater accumulates at the surface. The drainage dynamics suggest that the Gravaglione could be part of [...] Read more.
Gravaglione represents one of the main swallow holes of the Canale di Pirro, low Murge, Apulia region, Italy. Here, after an intense rainstorm, a huge volume of rainwater accumulates at the surface. The drainage dynamics suggest that the Gravaglione could be part of a large, and potentially unknown, karst system. To verify this hypothesis and to acquire useful information on the possible karst environment features, an integrated aerial and geophysical multiscale and multimethod approach was applied. In particular, aerial photogrammetry, ground penetrating radar measurements and electrical resistivity tomography surveys were hence conducted and integrated to potentially detect the caves, define the subsurface volume possibly affected by karst systems and to verify the existence of links between the surficial morphology and the subsoil structure. The results provided interesting insights regarding the presence of a complex karst system extending up to 200 m b.g.l. and with a marked 3D nature. Overall, the Gravaglione case study demonstrates the geophysical approach validity and poses the basis for the development of an expeditive and low-cost high-resolution strategy for detecting and characterizing karst caves. Full article
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23 pages, 12223 KiB  
Article
Understanding Spatial-Temporal Interactions of Ecosystem Services and Their Drivers in a Multi-Scale Perspective of Miluo Using Multi-Source Remote Sensing Data
by Shiyi Cao, Xijun Hu, Yezi Wang, Cunyou Chen, Dong Xu and Tingting Bai
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(14), 3479; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15143479 - 10 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1109
Abstract
In the face of rapid urbanization and global climate change, understanding the trade-offs and synergies of wetland city ecosystem services is vital for mitigating regional ecological and environmental risks, and enhancing human well-being. The Dongting Lake Basin is an ecologically fragile area of [...] Read more.
In the face of rapid urbanization and global climate change, understanding the trade-offs and synergies of wetland city ecosystem services is vital for mitigating regional ecological and environmental risks, and enhancing human well-being. The Dongting Lake Basin is an ecologically fragile area of global significance. Uncontrolled resource utilization and intensive human activities have severely damaged the ecological environment, including in Miluo. Thus, it is of paramount research importance to uncover the trade-offs and synergies of ecosystem services and their driving mechanisms in Miluo. To achieve this, we classified Miluo’s land use data over the past two decades using a random forest model and Landsat imagery. We quantified the major ecosystem services in Miluo by employing ecological process models such as InVEST, RUSLE, and CASA. Additionally, we examined the trade-offs and synergies between ecosystem services at different scales and identified the driving mechanisms using multi-source remote sensing data. The results revealed that forests exhibited the highest level of ecosystem services, while urban ecosystem services experienced a significant decline. Over the past two decades, Miluo displayed notable trade-offs and synergies between ecosystem services, with synergies prevailing as the dominant pattern, particularly at the county scale. Furthermore, human activities emerged as the primary driver of changes in Miluo’s ecosystem services during the 20-year period. Therefore, it is imperative for scientists, policymakers, and civil society to develop effective and scientifically sound strategies to mitigate the ecological risks resulting from rapid urbanization and climate change in the future. Full article
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