Special Issue "Religion and Nationalism"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Liah Greenfeld

Department of Sociology, Boston University, #608, 745 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nationalism; modernity; mind (soul); mental illness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is now clear that the conventional understanding of secularization as the despiritualization of, and, specifically, the disappearance of religion from everyday experience is wrong. This conventional view has been a central element in the studies of nationalism, proposing that nationalism emerges in the place vacated by religion. In opposition to this conventional view,within religious studies, in contrast, nationalism has been on the whole considered irrelevant. The purpose of this issue is to examine the close and complex relationship between religion and nationalism in modern experience, so clearly evident today everywhere around the world. Thereby it hopes to contribute to the correction of the dominant understanding of modernity as irreligious and dominant understanding of religion as "traditional" in the sense of "backward" and out-of-step with modern society, and revisit the nature of the secular itself.

Prof. Dr. Liah Greenfeld
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • modernity
  • nationalism
  • political ideology
  • religion
  • secular world
  • secularization
  • spirituality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Nation as a Neo-Idol: Muslim Political Theology and the Critique of Secular Nationalism in Modern South Asia
Religions 2018, 9(11), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9110355
Received: 30 August 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
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Abstract
Modern perspectives on nationalism tend to privilege structuralist readings which approach nationalism as entailing economic and political restructuring, thereby overlooking the necessary role of human factors in the functioning of nationalism. Religious opposition to secular nationalism is then condemned as backward, reactionary, fundamentalist,
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Modern perspectives on nationalism tend to privilege structuralist readings which approach nationalism as entailing economic and political restructuring, thereby overlooking the necessary role of human factors in the functioning of nationalism. Religious opposition to secular nationalism is then condemned as backward, reactionary, fundamentalist, or ideological. However, a different understanding of nationalism is uncovered when the role of human factors in nationalism are scrutinized. Toward discerning the role of human factors in nationalism and its relation to religion in general, I turn to Liah Greenfeld’s analysis of social psychology of nationalism as a secular ideology. In exploring the effects of nationalist ideology on religion, I return to the earliest Muslim debates on nationalism in South Asia between two critics of nationalism, Muhammad Iqbal and Abu’l A’laa Mawdudi, and their opponents, Abul Kalam Azad and Husayn Ahmad Madani. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Nationalism)
Open AccessArticle Unexpected Convergences: Religious Nationalism in Israel and Turkey
Religions 2018, 9(11), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9110334
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 12 October 2018 / Accepted: 13 October 2018 / Published: 30 October 2018
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Abstract
This article compares Israel and Turkey to demonstrate how religious nationalism can be analyzed by a combination of historical institutionalism and conceptual history of religious ideas and doctrines. Both cases exemplify how the building of the nation-state was associated with the exportation of
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This article compares Israel and Turkey to demonstrate how religious nationalism can be analyzed by a combination of historical institutionalism and conceptual history of religious ideas and doctrines. Both cases exemplify how the building of the nation-state was associated with the exportation of the western concept of religion. The resulting association between national territory, state and religion can explain the existing politicization of religion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Nationalism)
Open AccessArticle Nation, Race, and Religious Identity in the Early Nazi Movement
Religions 2018, 9(10), 303; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9100303
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 29 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 October 2018 / Published: 7 October 2018
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Abstract
This paper examines the dissemination of radical nationalist and racist ideas among Catholics within the early Nazi movement in Munich. While the relationship between the Nazi regime and the Catholic faith was often antagonistic after 1933, a close examination of the earliest years
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This paper examines the dissemination of radical nationalist and racist ideas among Catholics within the early Nazi movement in Munich. While the relationship between the Nazi regime and the Catholic faith was often antagonistic after 1933, a close examination of the earliest years of the Nazi movement reveals a different picture. In the immediate aftermath of the First World War and within the specific context of Munich and its overwhelmingly Catholic environs, early Nazi activists attempted to resacralize political life, synthesizing radical völkisch nationalism with reformist, “modern” conceptions of Catholic faith and identity. In so doing, they often built on ideas that circulated in Catholic circles before the First World War, particularly within the Reform Catholic movement in Munich. By examining depictions of nation and race among three important Catholic groups—reform-oriented priests, publicists, and university students—this paper strives not only to shed light on the conditions under which the Nazi movement was able to survive its tumultuous infancy, but also to offer brief broader reflections on the interplay between nationalism, racism, and religious identity. The article ultimately suggests it was specifically the malleability and conceptual imprecision of those terms that often enhanced their ability to penetrate and circulate effectively within religious communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Nationalism)
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