Minds as Creaturely and Divine

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 15511

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Catholic Theology, Ruhr Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
Interests: theological anthropology; philosophy of mind; atonement; image of God; deification; consciousness; dualism; idealism

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Guest Editor
Catholic Theology, Ruhr Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
Interests: German idealism; natural theology; analytic theology; panentheism

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Guest Editor
Boyce College, SBTS, 2825 Lexington Road, Louisville, KY 40280, USA
Interests: topography; human geography; liturgical anthropology; image of God; philosophy of language; aesthetics; poetics; natural theology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The aim of this Issue is to theologically assess mental properties from the vantage point of Thomism, dualism, and idealism. Specifically, the authors will address the nature of mental properties as divine signs, types, or content that is both creaturely and Divine. This may include critical reflections on the implications following from consciousness and the existence of God or ways in which the mind might factor into constructive systematic theological proposals on humans as image bearers and parsing out different relations image bearers have to God (in creation, redemption, and as deified beings in the eschaton).

We are pleased to invite you to write for this Special Issue on themes relevant to and overlapping with philosophy of mind, neuroscience, and theological anthropology. You are particularly fitting for this issue. The issue will aim at a theological assessment of mental properties from the perspective of Thomism, dualism, and idealism. Authors will address a variety of issues all having to do with consciousness, mental properties and how these factor into the different theological aspects of being human in creation, in redemption, and in the eschaton. We invite philosophical assessments of the implications of consciousness as well as constructive theological accounts as to how the mind relates to God. We also welcome other contributions in the field of theological anthropology, generally, and the image of God, specifically.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: theological anthropology, science-engaged theology, philosophy of theological anthropology, arguments from consciousness to God.

Prof. Dr. Joshua Farris
Prof. Dr. Benedikt Paul Göcke
Dr. Timothy Kleiser
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • divine minds
  • human minds
  • neuroscientific theology
  • minds and liturgy
  • deified minds

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 405 KiB  
Article
Whoever I Am: On the Quality of Life
by Nicola Masciandaro
Religions 2024, 15(6), 735; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15060735 - 17 Jun 2024
Viewed by 218
Abstract
What is the relation between quantification and the mysterious question of identity? What order of quality is proper to the inexplicable fact that one is oneself? Starting with an examination of the ontological blind spots of counting, this essay investigates the priority of [...] Read more.
What is the relation between quantification and the mysterious question of identity? What order of quality is proper to the inexplicable fact that one is oneself? Starting with an examination of the ontological blind spots of counting, this essay investigates the priority of quality over quantity, in connection with the spiritual nature of life understood as the spontaneous and infinitely evolving question of itself. It argues, in face of the forces of quantophrenia and numerocracy, for the importance of recognizing the essentially serial and apophatic structure of identity, the existential sense that all entities are the living question of themselves. As such, no individual may be considered as merely a part of reality. Each is, no less, the totality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minds as Creaturely and Divine)
21 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
Quantum Physics and the Existence of God
by Stephen Priest
Religions 2024, 15(1), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15010078 - 9 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 9324
Abstract
Interpretations of quantum physics are shown to presuppose the reality of consciousness. But if a minimal realism about the external world is true, then the consciousness presupposed by quantum reality cannot be only that of the scientific observer, cannot be only ‘local’ but [...] Read more.
Interpretations of quantum physics are shown to presuppose the reality of consciousness. But if a minimal realism about the external world is true, then the consciousness presupposed by quantum reality cannot be only that of the scientific observer, cannot be only ‘local’ but must be ‘global’. Global consciousness is argued to have all and only the essential properties of God. Quantum reality depends on God’s consciousness and the physical world depends on quantum reality. Therefore, the physical world depends on God’s consciousness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minds as Creaturely and Divine)
14 pages, 245 KiB  
Article
On the Knowledge of My Existence: Towards My Existence as the Adverbial Transcendent/Immanent
by Shogo Shimizu
Religions 2023, 14(12), 1497; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel14121497 - 3 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2200
Abstract
I exist in the universe in a unique manner. I seem to know this statement to be true. However, even if I did not exist, the human who happens to be me could be living and writing the same statement. Then, do I [...] Read more.
I exist in the universe in a unique manner. I seem to know this statement to be true. However, even if I did not exist, the human who happens to be me could be living and writing the same statement. Then, do I really know that the statement is true? Do I really have epistemic contact with my existence? The aim of paper is to clearly raise this question and to offer a positive answer. By drawing on the disjunctive theory of perception, I propose the account that my existence can be involved in experience. To consider how my existence can be involved in experience and can be known from within experience, I refer to Wittgenstein, Kuki Shūzō, and Nishida Kitarō, and present the panentheistic view that my actual existence can be a limit of experience, both transcendent of and immanent in experience. This view is made persuasive by understanding the transcendence and immanence of my existence as adverbial. My conclusion is that I do know with certainty that I exist in the universe in a unique manner, and that this knowledge lies beyond Cartesian certainty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minds as Creaturely and Divine)
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