Special Issue "Reflecting on the Possibilities of Religious Education Research"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Humanities/Philosophies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kathy Winings
Website
Guest Editor
Unification Theological Seminary; 4 West 43rd Street, NYC, NY 10036, USA
Interests: religious education; spiritual formation; neuroeducation; neurotheology; pedagogical and curricular innovations; social justice; service learning; teaching; music

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will provide a look at important research in religious education that is taking place in diverse areas of the globe and from multiple perspectives. This Special Issue will allow contributors to provide a wide-angle look at critical issues that the field of religious education can and should address in order to make a decided contribution to faith communities and religious educators in a wide range of contexts. Issues and questions that may be presented range from defining a faithful life in a post-coronavirus world and addressing the questions of the coming generations on the impact of religious education on environmental concerns, challenges to justice and equality, economics, religious education and faith in a digital online world, insights into teaching and learning, and the possible influence of neuroscience.

The global community is changing on an almost daily basis. While this is not a new phenomenon, the sense that such ongoing change is outside of one’s control serves to increase fears and stress. Moreover, life with the current global pandemic has seemed to heighten these concerns, reminding humanity that we are profoundly interconnected. More importantly, the global context has laid the groundwork for those of all ages to raise essential and profound questions. For those of us in the field of religious education, we regularly deal with these concerns and questions from within our faith communities and our educational institutions. The questions being raised include how one defines their faith during challenging times and especially in a post-pandemic world. What kind of spiritual, moral, and faith roots are needed to maneuver in and survive in such chaotic times? What is the nature of the religious education that will best prepare individuals to meet the future with faith and hope?

Some studies on the future of religion and faith would have us believe that the future is bleak, as we see the rise of the new category designated as “nones” or those who are religiously unaffiliated and similar generational issues. However, at the same time, one can also choose to view our present day as an opportunity to broaden the focus of religious education research. For example, what might the field of neuroscience and neurotheology offer our conversation? In what ways would a multidisciplinary focus broaden and enhance the work of religious education? What options are presented by the use of digital technology when it comes to effective teaching and learning in the field? What type of religious education research is needed that will highlight new boundaries in religious education?

The overall focus of this volume is about exploring these questions and others that will lead us to look at the breadth of religious education research. The scope of this Special Issue will be wide-ranging, allowing contributors to highlight religious education research that addresses vital areas such as environmental challenges, justice issues, and discrimination. Contributors can also pursue the arena of what Gabriel Moral has discussed as the four “inters”: intergenerational, interreligious, intercultural, and international religious education in terms of the challenges and opportunities that they offer the field. The purpose of this volume will be to open the field of religious education to a wide-ranging discussion at a time of tremendous richness and opportunity.

There have been journal articles and books that have addressed specific issues and concerns such as religious education and our secular world, pluralism, postmodernism, and the moral demands of religious education, as well as critical realism and other philosophical issues in relationship to religious education from international and interreligious perspectives. This Special Issue will serve as a complement and supplement that will continue to add to the current scholarship across the theological and educational spectrum by bringing together, in one volume, research that has been conducted by theologians, religious educators, practical theologians, and educational researchers in order to bring their research into religious education to the forefront so that the breadth and depth of the field is more easily available. In essence, this Special Issue allows contributors to dream and theologically reflect on what might be possible as we move forward in the field of religious education and so present the opportunity to contribute to the ongoing development of the field.

Dr. Kathy Winings
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • religious education
  • faith development
  • spiritual formation
  • philosophy of education
  • moral education
  • interreligious
  • intergenerational
  • Christian education
  • Islamic education
  • Jewish education
  • theological reflection

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Adolescents’ Perception of Religious Education According to Religion and Gender in Spain
Religions 2020, 11(11), 616; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11110616 - 19 Nov 2020
Abstract
The aim of our study is to verify the influence of Religious Education on Spanish adolescents by applying a quantitative study based on descriptive and social research methods which reflect the religious and social plurality of Spain, with a total of 679 secondary [...] Read more.
The aim of our study is to verify the influence of Religious Education on Spanish adolescents by applying a quantitative study based on descriptive and social research methods which reflect the religious and social plurality of Spain, with a total of 679 secondary education students. By means of the Delphi technique, an exploratory and semi-confirmatory factor analysis, and a confirmatory analysis using structural equations, the psychometric properties of the questionnaire designed are guaranteed. Using a multivariate analysis of variance, after the Levene test, multiple comparisons are made in order to assess the difference between religions and gender with respect to school Religious Education. Significant differences and large effect sizes are found. The results show first that experiences with regard to religion in school are more positive for the group of Christian women and that of Muslim men; second, that the knowledge of religion helps in the daily development of adolescents; third, that men from the two major religious groups and Jewish women demand more autonomy; and lastly, that students consider that the curricular development of religion in school should be reviewed, although it is confirmed that Religious Education is regarded as important for their life and future development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reflecting on the Possibilities of Religious Education Research)
Open AccessArticle
Religious Education in (Post-)Pandemic Times; Becoming a Resilient Professional in a Teacher Academy
Religions 2020, 11(11), 610; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11110610 - 17 Nov 2020
Abstract
The world seems a different place than it was before and now, more than ever, young people are faced with questions that cannot be avoided any longer: who am I? How and where can I find roots to endure the storms in my [...] Read more.
The world seems a different place than it was before and now, more than ever, young people are faced with questions that cannot be avoided any longer: who am I? How and where can I find roots to endure the storms in my life? In what direction should I steer my compass? These questions are about resilience; the ability of individuals to cope with rapid societal change, both in their personal lives and in their professional career. Religious Education (RE) can help pupils and students to develop resilience by articulating these questions and pursuing them. The RE teacher’s job is to simply be there with them, having considered these questions her- or himself. All teachers and educators have to start with their own reflection: who am I as an RE-teacher in this new, uncertain and rapidly transforming world? Research on how to start this reflective formation process in RE is essential to attracting the attention that RE deserves. In this article, examples of pilots and the research conducted on them in the author’s Teacher Academy are presented. The main goal is to contribute to the formation of young people to make them resilient and fit for the -as yet unknown- future. They have to create this future and use their talents to effect the transformation that our world highly needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reflecting on the Possibilities of Religious Education Research)
Open AccessArticle
Trauma-Informed Pedagogy for the Religious and Theological Higher Education Classroom
Religions 2020, 11(9), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11090449 - 02 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This article promotes a wider understanding of trauma-informed pedagogy for the higher education classroom, whether in-person or virtual, focusing on undergraduate and graduate teaching in religious studies and theological education. Trauma is not confined to individual experiences of single horrifying events—trauma can be [...] Read more.
This article promotes a wider understanding of trauma-informed pedagogy for the higher education classroom, whether in-person or virtual, focusing on undergraduate and graduate teaching in religious studies and theological education. Trauma is not confined to individual experiences of single horrifying events—trauma can be collective (community-wide, e.g., COVID-19), epigenetic (inherited or intergenerational), social-cultural (e.g., racism), or vicarious. Drawing on religious education literature and recent insights from psychology, neuroscience, and public health studies, this article provides a shared basis for further development of trauma-informed pedagogy by religious and theological educators. A principle feature of this article is bibliographic, portraying the state of scholarship at the intersection of religious education and trauma and pointing to resources necessary for further development. It offers a brief survey of extant literature, presents a basic definition and description of trauma, introduces the features of a trauma-informed community approach, and discusses the core values guiding trauma-informed pedagogy. The article also explores religious aspects of trauma and discusses care for instructors, who deal with their own traumatic pasts as well as the secondary effects of encountering, teaching, and supporting traumatized individuals in the religious education classroom. This article concludes with a call for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reflecting on the Possibilities of Religious Education Research)
Open AccessArticle
Integration of Tauhidic Elements for Environmental Education from the Teachers’ Perspectives
Religions 2020, 11(8), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080394 - 31 Jul 2020
Abstract
Serious environmental damage calls for the need of complementary approaches in applying tauhidic elements for environmental education. Hence, this study examined how the practices of integrating tauhidic elements for environmental education are carried out in two Islamic science boarding schools. A qualitative study [...] Read more.
Serious environmental damage calls for the need of complementary approaches in applying tauhidic elements for environmental education. Hence, this study examined how the practices of integrating tauhidic elements for environmental education are carried out in two Islamic science boarding schools. A qualitative study was conducted by interviewing two science teachers and two Islamic education teachers from each school and an environmental education coordinator for data triangulation. The participants of this study were sampled using purposive sampling. The interview data transcribed were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings show that the integration of tauhidic elements in the school curriculum takes place with the support of the teachers and school administrators. However, the integration of tauhidic elements for environmental education only takes place through two approaches, namely through the inculcation of values from the teachers’ advice and actions as role models, as well as through the activities of seeking the meaning of the verses in the al-Quran or the Hadith that are related to environmental concepts. The findings also demonstrate that the students already have good environmental knowledge, awareness, and interest in nature, but require enhancements concerning their practices of environmental conservation. In sum, integrating tauhidic elements for environmental education requires the cooperation of science teachers and Islamic education teachers as well as strong support from other subject teachers and environmental clubs in schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reflecting on the Possibilities of Religious Education Research)
Back to TopTop