Special Issue "Advanced Low NOx Combustion Technologies"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jun Xiang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: pollutant generation mechanisms and emission control technology; supercritical CO2 power generation technology; utilization of biomass and solid waste
Prof. Dr. Sheng Su
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: structural features and reactivity of solid fuels; pollutant control for combustion system; utilization and incineration of solid waste

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the atmosphere contribute to the formation of acid rain precursors, to the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere, and to global warming. A significant amount of nitrogen oxide emissions is attributed to the combustion of biomass and fossil fuels. As a result of the need to reduce NOx emissions, various NOx reduction technologies have been investigated. Generally, the fundamental methods for NOx control technologies involve one of the following two strategies: The first strategy is that of minimizing the reaction temperature and/or delaying the mixing of nitrogen from the fuel with oxygen in the combustion air, while creating a staging zone in which NOx can be reduced to N2. This strategy is commonly called low NOx combustion and utilizes technologies including low NOx burners, combustion modifications, air-staging, fuel-staging, flue gas recirculation, reburning, and advanced reburning. The second strategy is that of injecting a reducing agent, typically ammonia or urea, that reacts with NOx to form N2 and H2O. Technologies representative of the strategy are selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). Modifying the combustion process often controls NOx most economically, but these NOx control technologies can often be used in combination in order to obtain the ultralow NOx emissions.

In recent years, increasingly stringent NOx emissions regulations have been implemented in a number of industrialized countries; these regulations have driven and continue to drive the development of NOx emissions control techniques. Although the low NOx combustion technological principles are well established, practical and extensive adoption of low NOx combustion technology in different combustion systems is hindered by some technical and economic challenges, such as the decrease in fuel burnout and thermal efficiency, the increase in reduction gases (e.g., CO, H2S), and the increase in slagging/corrosion problems. Some efforts have been made to address those challenges by optimizing the low NOx combustion process, developing the deeply staged combustion technology and combustion diagnosis technology, and even promoting the oxy-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion technologies. By presenting some of the latest research developments in the field of advanced low NOx combustion processes, it is hoped that additional research will provide a science-based program grounded in a fundamental understanding of NOx generation and control and will contribute to the advancement of NOx emission control technology.

Prof. Dr. Jun Xiang
Prof. Dr. Sheng Su
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Low NOx combustion technologies
  • NOx emission control technologies
  • Slagging/corrosion
  • CO/H2S generation control
  • Low NOx burners
  • Air-staging combustion process
  • Fuel-staging combustion process
  • Reburning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effects of Parent Coal Properties on the Pyrolytic Char Chemical Structure: Insights from Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Based on 32 Kinds of Chinese Coals
Processes 2021, 9(9), 1575; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9091575 - 02 Sep 2021
Viewed by 397
Abstract
The chemical structures of pyrolytic chars prepared from 32 kinds of Chinese coals were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy in this study. Both first-order and second-order Raman spectra of the chars were curve-fitted and analyzed. The effects of the parent coal properties, including coal [...] Read more.
The chemical structures of pyrolytic chars prepared from 32 kinds of Chinese coals were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy in this study. Both first-order and second-order Raman spectra of the chars were curve-fitted and analyzed. The effects of the parent coal properties, including coal rank, volatile, fixed carbon, and ash content, on the pyrolytic char structures were detailed discussed and the correlations between these coal properties and pyrolytic char chemical structures were set up. Multiple-factor analysis was done to propose a comprehensive coal property index that relates well to the pyrolytic char chemical structure. The results indicate that the aromatization degree is the key distinguishable structure of pyrolytic chars prepared from coals with various rank, and the alkyl C−H and aryl C−H structures have no significant difference. The aromatization degree of pyrolytic char decreases with the increase of coal rank, while it increases with the increase of the fixed carbon content in parent coals. The high content of moisture in parent coal can induce condensation of the pyrolytic char, but the inorganic composition probably prevents the condensation of the char. Limited correlations between the coal rank, fixed carbon, moisture and ash content, and the aromatization degree of pyrolytic chars were found. A comprehensive coal property index: (fixed carbon content + moisture content)/(volatile content + ash content) (in air dry basis) combining the coal properties together relates well to the aromatization degree of pyrolytic char and can act as a good indicator for the pyrolytic char chemical structure. This study reveals the effects of the parent coal properties, including coal rank, fixed carbon, moisture, and ash content, on the pyrolytic char chemical structure, and provides a new comprehensive coal property index to predict the pyrolytic char chemical structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Low NOx Combustion Technologies)
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