Application and Development of Ultrasonic Technology in Food Processing

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Process Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2024 | Viewed by 615

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Technology Fundamentals, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
Interests: ultrasound extraction; bioactive compounds; antioxidant activity; phenolic compounds; anthocyanins; functional food; food pomaces; UV-VIS spectrophotometry

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Guest Editor
Department of Technology Fundamentals, University of Life Sciences, Głęboka 28, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
Interests: ultrasonic; microwaves and subcritical extraction; mathematical modeling of food and chemical processes; rheological properties of food materials; quantitative and qualitative determination of food ingredients; UV-VIS spectrophotometry; HPLC
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Technology Fundamentals, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
Interests: food science; food bioactive compounds; antioxidant activity; phenolic compounds; anthocyanins; functional food; food wastes (pomaces); food fortification; use of food byproducts; ultrasound; extraction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the use of ultrasonic technology in food processing. Ultrasound has various applications in food processing due to its ability to induce physical, chemical, and mechanical changes in food materials. The use of ultrasound has a positive effect on the sensory evaluation of products and their nutritional value, generating lower energy costs and shorter processing times. Ultrasonic technology can be used at various stages of production, e.g., during mixing, emulsification, and homogenization. Ultrasonic processing is an alternative to the conventional thermal methods used during pasteurization and food preservation. Ultrasonic technology is also used as an alternative to conventional freezing, thawing, and drying. Ultrasonic treatment is likewise used when extracting bioactive substances from raw plant materials. One more important topic is the use of ultrasound to wash fruits and vegetables.

This Special Issue aims to publish original scientific articles and review articles devoted to the use of ultrasonic technology in food processing. Another important issue is the effects of ultrasound on the composition, quality, and safety of foods and by-products. The use of ultrasound in the food industry requires the use of appropriate devices, including large-scale ultrasonic reactors, which are also the subject of this Special Issue.

Dr. Monika Krzywicka
Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Kobus
Dr. Anna Pecyna
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • ultrasonic treatment
  • food processing
  • extraction
  • preservation
  • mixing
  • emulsification
  • homogenization
  • freezing
  • drying
  • ultrasonic cleaning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 2150 KiB  
Article
The Effect of High Intensity Ultrasound on the Quality and Shelf Life of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Muscle
by Andrea Ugalde-Torres, Víctor Manuel Ocaño-Higuera, Saúl Ruíz-Cruz, Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez, Wilfrido Torres-Arreola, Nathaly Montoya-Camacho and Enrique Marquez-Rios
Processes 2024, 12(7), 1441; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12071441 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
It has been documented that the shelf life of fishery products is extremely reduced due to microbial development and its endogenous biochemistry. For this reason, food technologists around the world are researching how to reduce the main processes that lead to spoilage. Recently, [...] Read more.
It has been documented that the shelf life of fishery products is extremely reduced due to microbial development and its endogenous biochemistry. For this reason, food technologists around the world are researching how to reduce the main processes that lead to spoilage. Recently, high-intensity ultrasound (HIU) has had different applications in the food industry because the cavitation effect can inhibit or reduce microbial development as well as cause conformational changes in muscle enzymes. Therefore, in this study, HIU was applied for 30, 60, and 90 min to the tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fillet, and subsequently, it was stored on ice for 20 days. During this period, samples were taken every 5 days (day 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20), and moisture content, pH, total volatile base (TVB-N), non-protein nitrogen (NPN), texture, electrophoresis, color, and microbiological analyses (mesophiles and psychrophiles) were determined. No significant changes (p ≥ 0.05) were observed in the moisture content, pH, and the L* parameter, while a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in TVB-N (from 29.67 to 15.09), NPN (from 0.39 to 0.27%), and texture (from 4.88 to 2.69 N) were found. On the other hand, an increase (p < 0.05) in a* (from 2.02 to 4.27) and b* (from 10.66 to 12.45) parameters, as well as total mesophile count (from 2.48 to 6.52 log CFU/g) were detected due to the application of ultrasound. The results suggest that the application of this treatment represents a viable alternative to increase the shelf life and quality of tilapia fillets stored on ice. Full article
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