Special Issue "Polymers and Drug Delivery Systems"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Iolanda De Marco
Website
Guest Editor
Industrial Engineering Department, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, I-84084, Fisciano (Salerno), Italy
Interests: polymer/active principle composites; drug delivery; supercritical carbon dioxide; microparticles and nanoparticles precipitation; biopolymer aerogels; polymer/drug coprecipitation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biocompatible natural and synthetic polymers are commonly used for drug delivery. Depending on the specific application, a modified release of the drug is frequently required, considering that the bioavailability of the active principal depends on its dissolution rate. If an active principal is scarcely soluble in water and a fast release is required, a hydrosoluble polymer can be used as carrier for the drug to enhance its dissolution rate. Contrariwise, controlled or sustained drug release obtained with the aid of hydrophobic polymers can be used to extend the active principle release, reducing the number of administrations. Additionally, the release of the drug at or near a specific site of action can be reached with targeted release products. In all these novel formulations, the characteristics of the final product strongly depend on the choice of the polymeric carrier.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect research and review papers on different polymer/drug composites. Polymer/drug microparticles to obtain tablets or granules for oral suspensions, polymeric capsules containing the active principle, loaded foams, membranes, or aerogels for topical delivery are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Iolanda De Marco
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • polymer/drug composites
  • fast, controlled or prolonged release
  • targeted delivery
  • natural and synthetic polymers
  • bioavailability
  • coprecipitated microparticles
  • drug loaded aerogels and foams
  • capsules for active principle delivery

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Nile Red-Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)/Silica Nanocomposite Particles Increase the Sensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells to Tamoxifen
Polymers 2020, 12(7), 1516; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071516 (registering DOI) - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
Tamoxifen (TAM) is a hormonal drug and is mainly used as an anti-estrogen in breast cancer patients. TAM binds to estrogen receptors (ERs), resulting in inhibition of estrogen signaling pathways and thus, a downregulation of cell proliferation. Cancer cells with negative or low [...] Read more.
Tamoxifen (TAM) is a hormonal drug and is mainly used as an anti-estrogen in breast cancer patients. TAM binds to estrogen receptors (ERs), resulting in inhibition of estrogen signaling pathways and thus, a downregulation of cell proliferation. Cancer cells with negative or low ER expression will not uptake TAM and will show low response. Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles were prepared using surfactant-free emulsion polymerization, then were loaded with Nile red (NR), which resulted in PMMA-NR. To enhance TAM delivery to cervical cancer cells (HELA), which is considered ER-negative, we loaded TAM and polymethyl methacrylate nanoparticles-Nile-red into silica (PMMA-NR-Si-TAM). The uptake and intracellular distribution were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the in vitro cytotoxic activity was evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay using HELA and non-tumorigenic cell line HFF-1. The sensitivity of HELA (LC50: 207.31 µg/mL) and HFF-1 (LC50: 234.08 µg/mL) to free TAM was very low. However, after the encapsulation of TAM with PMMA-NR, the sensitivity significantly increased HELA (LC50: 71.83 µg/mL) and HFF-1 (LC50: 37.36 µg/mL). This indicates that TAM can be used for the treatment of ER-negative cervical cancer once conjugated to PMMA-NR nanoparticles. In addition, the PMMA-NR formulation appears to be highly suitable for cancer imaging and drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Drug Delivery Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Elaboration of Charged Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) Microparticles for Effective Release of Tranexamic Acid
Polymers 2020, 12(4), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12040808 - 04 Apr 2020
Abstract
In this study, tranexamic acid (TA) was used as a model compound to study the charge effect on the physicochemical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs). Charged PLGA MPs were elaborated by the incorporation of a quaternary ammonium, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), during [...] Read more.
In this study, tranexamic acid (TA) was used as a model compound to study the charge effect on the physicochemical properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs). Charged PLGA MPs were elaborated by the incorporation of a quaternary ammonium, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), during the double emulsion solvent evaporation process. Three TA-CTAB-carrying modes of PLGA MPs were designed in the CTAB-free (TA-MP), adsorption (TA-CTABAD), or encapsulation (TA-CTABEN) form. The obtained MPs were characterized by morphology and TA-MP affinity. The experiment revealed that the three prepared MPs were spherical and smooth, with pores on their surfaces. TA-CTABAD had a relatively narrow size distribution, compared with that of TA-MP and TA-CTABEN. The particle sizes of TA-MP, TA-CTABEN, TA-CTABAD were measured as 59 ± 17, 54 ± 20, and 19 ± 8 μm, respectively. The zeta potential of the three MPs was found to be in the order: TA-CTABAD > TA-CTABEN > TA-MP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that the manufacturing process had no influence on the glass transition temperature of the MPs, which was close to 48 °C. Thermogravimetric analysis illustrated that the presence of CTAB slightly changed the thermal stability of PLGA MPs. In vitro release showed that TA-CTABAD exhibited faster TA release than TA-MP and TA-CTABEN in a basic environment (pH of 13), probably because of electrostatic attraction. At pH = 1, the release of TA from TA-CTABEN was faster than those from TA-MP and TA-CTABAD, probably because of electrostatic repulsion. However, the effect of electrostatic interaction was not significant at pH = 7.4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Drug Delivery Systems)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Use of Poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) in the Delivery of Drugs: A Review
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1114; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051114 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is a hydrophilic polymer widely employed as a carrier in the pharmaceutical, biomedical, and nutraceutical fields. Up to now, several PVP-based systems have been developed to deliver different active principles, of both natural and synthetic origin. Various formulations and morphologies have [...] Read more.
Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is a hydrophilic polymer widely employed as a carrier in the pharmaceutical, biomedical, and nutraceutical fields. Up to now, several PVP-based systems have been developed to deliver different active principles, of both natural and synthetic origin. Various formulations and morphologies have been proposed using PVP, including microparticles and nanoparticles, fibers, hydrogels, tablets, and films. Its versatility and peculiar properties make PVP one of the most suitable and promising polymers for the development of new pharmaceutical forms. This review highlights the role of PVP in drug delivery, focusing on the different morphologies proposed for different polymer/active compound formulations. It also provides detailed information on active principles and used technologies, optimized process parameters, advantages, disadvantages, and final applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers and Drug Delivery Systems)
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