Special Issue "Durability of Polymer Micro- and Nano-Composites"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Nektaria Marianthi Barkoula
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece
Interests: Biodegradable/Biobased Composites, Nanocomposites, Eco-friendly Materials, Concrete based Materials, Durability, Wear, Structure-property relationships

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-performance polymer composites find use as structural materials in various outdoor applications, including aerospace, marine, transportation, energy, and infrastructure, due to their light weight, enhanced mechanical performance, corrosion resistance, and low maintenance cost. One important aspect that needs to be addressed for the successful application of polymer composites is related to their overall performance to the service environment. This includes their response to fatigue, creep, impact, as well as environmental loading. Thus, in addition to mechanical deterioration, the long-term durability of polymer composites has been in the spotlight the last few decades, since deterioration of their performance due to environmental exposure is still a major challenge for this type of materials. Most common conditions that promote degradation and durability loss include exposure to high or low temperatures, thermal shock, radiation, liquids or gases, etc.

At the same time, a significant amount of effort has been concentrated on improving the performance of polymer composites through innovation in materials, design, manufacturing, prediction of long-term behavior, and new evaluation methodologies. The introduction of nanoscale inclusions to improve the damage tolerance and enhance the damage sensing capabilities of polymers and microcomposites has also drawn attention lately.

Based on the above, this Special Issue is oriented at all types of polymer matrix composites, reinforced with micro- and/or nano-inclusions. Advances in all aspects that influence/improve the durability of polymer composites are of interest. Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere. All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts are available on the journal’s website.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Nektaria-Marianthi Barkoula
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Durability
  • Environmental loading
  • Fatigue
  • creep
  • Impact
  • wear
  • UV radiation
  • Water absorption
  • Thermal shock

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Physical Aging on Gas Transport in Asymmetric Polyimide Hollow Fibers Prepared by Triple-Orifice Spinneret
Polymers 2020, 12(2), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12020441 (registering DOI) - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
The systematic evaluation of the gas transport properties related to differences in the history of the samples is a useful tool to appropriately design a membrane-based gas separation system. The permeation rate of six pure gases was measured over time in asymmetric hollow-fiber [...] Read more.
The systematic evaluation of the gas transport properties related to differences in the history of the samples is a useful tool to appropriately design a membrane-based gas separation system. The permeation rate of six pure gases was measured over time in asymmetric hollow-fiber (HF) samples, that were prepared according to the non-solvent-induced phase separation in different operation conditions, in order to identify their response to physical aging. Four types of HFs having a different structure were analyzed, comparing samples spun in a triple-orifice spinneret to HFs prepared using a conventional spinneret. A generalized gas permeance decline, coupled to a maintained permselectivity for the different gas pairs, was observed for all HFs. Instead, H2/N2 permselectivity values were enhanced upon aging. Cross-linked hollow-fiber samples showed a marked size-sieving behavior that favored the separation of small species, e.g., hydrogen, from other larger species and a good stability over time. Some HFs, post-treated using different alcohols, presented a permeance decay independently on the alcohol type and a greater selectivity over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Durability of Polymer Micro- and Nano-Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
An Energy-Based Concept for Yielding of Multidirectional FRP Composite Structures Using a Mesoscale Lamina Damage Model
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010157 - 07 Jan 2020
Abstract
Composite structures are made of multidirectional (MD) fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminates, which fail due to multiple damages in matrix, interface, and fiber constituents at different scales. The yield point of a unidirectional FRP composite is assumed as the lamina strength limit representing [...] Read more.
Composite structures are made of multidirectional (MD) fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminates, which fail due to multiple damages in matrix, interface, and fiber constituents at different scales. The yield point of a unidirectional FRP composite is assumed as the lamina strength limit representing the damage initiation phenomena, while yielding of MD composites in structural applications are not quantified due to the complexity of the sequence of damage evolutions in different laminas dependent on their angle and specification. This paper proposes a new method to identify the yield point of MD composite structures based on the evolution of the damage dissipation energy (DDE). Such a characteristic evolution curve is computed using a validated finite element model with a mesoscale damage-based constitutive model that accounts for different matrix and fiber failure modes in angle lamina. The yield point of composite structures is identified to correspond to a 5% increase in the initial slope of the DDE evolution curve. The yield points of three antisymmetric MD FRP composite structures under flexural loading conditions are established based on Hashin unidirectional (UD) criteria and the energy-based criterion. It is shown that the new energy concept provides a significantly larger safe limit of yield for MD composite structures compared to UD criteria, in which the accumulation of energy dissipated due to all damage modes is less than 5% of the fracture energy required for the structural rupture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Durability of Polymer Micro- and Nano-Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental and Prediction Study of Displacement-Rate Effects on Flexural Behaviour in Nano and Micro TiO2 Particles-Epoxy Resin Composites
Polymers 2020, 12(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12010022 - 20 Dec 2019
Abstract
Epoxy resin composites with different weight fractions of TiO2 microparticles (1%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%) and of TiO2 nanoparticles (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3%) were prepared. The particle size of the nanoparticles was averaged around 21 nm while the particle size of [...] Read more.
Epoxy resin composites with different weight fractions of TiO2 microparticles (1%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%) and of TiO2 nanoparticles (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3%) were prepared. The particle size of the nanoparticles was averaged around 21 nm while the particle size of the micro TiO2 particles was averaged around 0.2 μm. The morphology of the manufactured particulate composites was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of both nanocomposites (21 nm) and microcomposites (0.2 μm) were investigated and compared through flexural testing. Furthermore, the effect of displacement-rate on the viscoelastic behavior of composite materials was investigated. The flexural tests were carried out at different filler weight fractions and different displacement-rates (0.5, 5, 10, 50 mm/min). The influence of TiO2 micro- and nanoparticles on the mechanical response of the manufactured composites was studied. For micro TiO2 composites, a maximum increase in flexural modulus on the order of 23% was achieved, while, in the nanocomposites, plastification of the epoxy matrix due to the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles was observed. Both behaviors were predicted by the Property Prediction Model (PPM), and a fair agreement between experimental results and theoretical predictions was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Durability of Polymer Micro- and Nano-Composites)
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