Antimicrobial Polymers and Polymeric Composites

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2024) | Viewed by 4419

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Nano Fusion Technology Research Group, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, Tokida 3-15-1, Ueda 386-8567, Japan
Interests: wound dressing; biocompatibility; active packaging; biosensing; drug delivery; nanofibers
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Guest Editor
Nano Fusion Technology Research Group, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, Tokida 3-15-1, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567, Japan
Interests: nanofibers; electrospinning; bio-medical; sensors; carbon materials; food packing; nano-catalysis; supercapacitor; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Water Research Center, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi 129188, United Arab Emirates
Interests: polymeric fibers; dyes; plasma treatment; ozonation; fuel cells; catalysts; coatings; gun spray; electrospinning; printing; coloration; biomedical; ultrasonication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microbial infestation remains one of the biggest concerns in many fields, particularly in medical devices, drugs coating, health care and hygiene applications, water purification systems, surgery types of equipment, textile/clothing, food packaging, and storage. Antimicrobial polymers are materials capable of killing or inhibiting microbial growth on their surface or vicinity. These materials gain interest in academic research and industry due to their potential to provide value and protection to many products. The use of antimicrobial polymers promises to enhance the efficacy of some existing antimicrobial agents and minimize the environmental problems accompanying conventional antimicrobial agents by reducing the residual toxicity of the agents, increasing their efficiency and selectivity, and prolonging the lifetime of the antimicrobial agents. In the past three decades, significant advances have been made in the synthesis and applications of polymers to prevent microbial attack and degradation for diverse end uses. The current special issue focuses on the research and review articles on the synthesis and application of antimicrobial polymers for biomedical, tissue engineering, food packaging, protective clothings, filtration media, and other related fields.

Dr. Azeem Ullah
Prof. Dr. Ick-Soo Kim
Dr. Muzamil Khatri
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5945 KiB  
Article
PVA/Inulin-Based Sustainable Films Reinforced with Pickering Emulsion of Niaouli Essential Oil for Potential Wound Healing Applications
by Fatma Nur Parın, Sofia El-Ghazali, Ayşenur Yeşilyurt, Uğur Parın, Azeem Ullah, Muzamil Khatri and Ick Soo Kim
Polymers 2023, 15(4), 1002; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15041002 - 17 Feb 2023
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2494
Abstract
In this study, sustainable water-based films were produced via the solvent-casting method. Petroleum-free-based polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and carbohydrate-based inulin (INL) were used as matrices. Vegetable-waste pumpkin powder was used in the study because of its sustainability and antibacterial properties. Pickering emulsions were prepared [...] Read more.
In this study, sustainable water-based films were produced via the solvent-casting method. Petroleum-free-based polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and carbohydrate-based inulin (INL) were used as matrices. Vegetable-waste pumpkin powder was used in the study because of its sustainability and antibacterial properties. Pickering emulsions were prepared using β-cyclodextrin. The influence of the different ratios of the β-cyclodextrin/niaouli essential oil (β-CD/NEO) inclusion complex (such as 1:1, 1:3, and 1:5) on the morphological (SEM), thermal (TGA), physical (FT-IR), wettability (contact angle), and mechanical (tensile test) characteristics of PVA/inulin films were investigated. Moreover, the antibacterial activities against the Gram () (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram (+) (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria of the obtained films were studied. From the morphological analysis, good emulsion stability and porosity were obtained in the Pickering films with the highest oil content, while instability was observed in the Pickering films with the lowest concentration of oil content. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis indicated there was no significant difference between the Pickering emulsion films and neat films. With the addition of Pickering emulsions, the tensile stress values decreased from 7.3 ± 1.9 MPa to 3.3 ± 0.2. According to the antibacterial efficiency results, films containing pumpkin powder and Pickering emulsion films containing both pumpkin powder and a ratio of 1:1 (β-CD/NEO) did not have an antibacterial effect, while Pickering emulsion films with a ratio of (β-CD/NEO) 1:3 and 1:5 showed an antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli, with a zone diameter of 12 cm and 17 cm, respectively. Among the samples, the films with ratio of (β-CD/NEO) 1:5 had the highest antioxidant capacity, as assessed by DPPH radical scavenging at 12 h intervals. Further, none of the samples showed any cytotoxic effects the according to LDH and WST-1 cytotoxicity analysis for the NIH3T3 cell line. Ultimately, it is expected that these films are completely bio-based and may be potential candidates for use in wound healing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers and Polymeric Composites)
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21 pages, 3195 KiB  
Article
Bacterial Response to the Surface Aging of PLA Matrices Loaded with Active Compounds
by María Fernández-Grajera, Amparo María Gallardo-Moreno, Verónica Luque-Agudo, María Luisa González-Martín and Margarita Hierro-Oliva
Polymers 2022, 14(22), 4976; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14224976 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1354
Abstract
The use of active components in biomaterials improves the properties of existing ones and makes it possible to obtain new devices with antibacterial properties that prevent infections after implantation, thus guaranteeing the success of the implant. In this work, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and [...] Read more.
The use of active components in biomaterials improves the properties of existing ones and makes it possible to obtain new devices with antibacterial properties that prevent infections after implantation, thus guaranteeing the success of the implant. In this work, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and magnesium particles were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) films to assess the extent to which progressive aging of the new surfaces resists bacterial colonization processes. For this purpose, the films’ surface was characterized by contact angle measurements, ToF-SIMS and AFM, and adhesion, viability and biofilm growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria on these films were also evaluated. The results show that the inclusion of Mg and CTAB in PLA films changes their surface properties both before and after aging and also modifies bacterial adhesion on the polymer. Complete bactericidal activity is exhibited on non-degraded films and films with CTAB. This antibacterial behavior is maintained after degradation for three months in the case of films containing a higher amount of CTAB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers and Polymeric Composites)
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