Advanced Manufacturing of Polymeric Biomaterials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 3569

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Biomedical Engineering, Shenzhen Campus of Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China
Interests: biomaterials; supramolecular hydrogels; 3D printing

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Guest Editor
School of Biomedical Engineering, Shenzhen Campus of Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China
Interests: biomaterials; bone-repairing materials; tissue engineering; interventional medical device

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Guest Editor
Department of Microsystems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Freiburg, Breisgau, Germany
Interests: cellular materials; metamaterials; additive manufacturing; freeze casting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymeric biomaterials, including synthetic polymers, biopolymers, and their composites used in biomedical applications, are critical to the performance of, for example, capsules for drug delivery, implants for regenerative medicine, surgical tools, and lab-on-a-chip for diagnostics.  The particular requirements for biomedical applications, e.g., biocompatibility and potentially biodegradable, could not only be achieved by the selection of materials, but also by advanced manufacturing processes. The advanced manufacturing of polymer biomaterials, including 3D printing laser cutting and engraving, electospinning, freeze casting, etc., could achieve the custom design of polymeric biomaterials across different scales, including their composition, internal microstructure, surface and interfaces, and macroscopic geometry, and consequently their structural and functional properties. This Special Issue aims to present various reviews and perspectives which explore the advanced manufacturing of polymeric biomaterials. Experimental and simulation approaches are both welcomed. We will appreciate your contributions to this Special Issue.

Dr. Qianming Lin
Prof. Dr. Chao Zhang
Dr. Kaiyang Yin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • composites
  • biopolymers
  • synthetic polymers
  • 3D printing
  • freeze casting
  • biocompatibility
  • microfluidics
  • drug/gene delivery
  • antibacterial materials
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 7151 KiB  
Article
Chondrogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Induced by Decellularized Cartilage Matrix/Silk Fibroin Secondary Crosslinking Hydrogel Scaffolds with a Three-Dimensional Microstructure
by Jing Zhou, Nier Wu, Jinshi Zeng, Ziyu Liang, Zuoliang Qi, Haiyue Jiang, Haifeng Chen and Xia Liu
Polymers 2023, 15(8), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15081868 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1403
Abstract
Finding an ideal scaffold is always an important issue in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. Both decellularized extracellular matrix and silk fibroin have been used as natural biomaterials for tissue regeneration. In this study, a secondary crosslinking method of γ irradiation and [...] Read more.
Finding an ideal scaffold is always an important issue in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. Both decellularized extracellular matrix and silk fibroin have been used as natural biomaterials for tissue regeneration. In this study, a secondary crosslinking method of γ irradiation and ethanol induction was used to prepare decellularized cartilage extracellular matrix and silk fibroin (dECM-SF) hydrogels with biological activity. Furthermore, the dECM-SF hydrogels were cast in custom-designed molds to produce a three-dimensional multi-channeled structure to improve internal connectivity. The adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC) were seeded on the scaffolds, cultured in vitro for 2 weeks, and implanted in vivo for another 4 and 12 weeks. The double crosslinked dECM-SF hydrogels exhibited an excellent pore structure after lyophilization. The multi-channeled hydrogel scaffold presents higher water absorption ability, surface wettability, and no cytotoxicity. The addition of dECM and a channeled structure could promote chondrogenic differentiation of ADSC and engineered cartilage formation, confirmed by H&E, safranin O staining, type II collagen immunostaining, and qPCR assay. In conclusion, the hydrogel scaffold fabricated by the secondary crosslinking method has good plasticity and can be used as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The multi-channeled dECM-SF hydrogel scaffolds possess a chondrogenic induction activity that promotes engineered cartilage regeneration of ADSC in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Polymeric Biomaterials)
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16 pages, 4665 KiB  
Article
Biological Characteristics of Polyurethane-Based Bone-Replacement Materials
by Marfa N. Egorikhina, Andrey E. Bokov, Irina N. Charykova, Yulia P. Rubtsova, Daria D. Linkova, Irina I. Kobyakova, Ekaterina A. Farafontova, Svetlana Ya. Kalinina, Yuri N. Kolmogorov and Diana Ya. Aleynik
Polymers 2023, 15(4), 831; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15040831 - 7 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1410
Abstract
A study is presented on four polymers of the polyurethane family, obtained using a two-stage process. The first composition is the basic polymer; the others differ from it by the presence of a variety of fillers, introduced to provide radiopacity. The fillers used [...] Read more.
A study is presented on four polymers of the polyurethane family, obtained using a two-stage process. The first composition is the basic polymer; the others differ from it by the presence of a variety of fillers, introduced to provide radiopacity. The fillers used were 15% bismuth oxide (Composition 2), 15% tantalum pentoxide (Composition 3), or 15% zirconium oxide (Composition 4). Using a test culture of human fibroblasts enabled the level of cytotoxicity of the compositions to be determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay, along with variations in the characteristics of the cells resulting from their culture directly on the specimens. The condition of cells on the surfaces of the specimens was assessed using fluorescence microscopy. It was shown that introducing 15% bismuth, tantalum, or zinc compounds as fillers produced a range of effects on the biological characteristics of the compositions. With the different fillers, the levels of toxicity differed and the cells’ proliferative activity or adhesion was affected. However, in general, all the studied compositions may be considered cytocompatible in respect of their biological characteristics and are promising for further development as bases for bone-substituting materials. The results obtained also open up prospects for further investigations of polyurethane compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Polymeric Biomaterials)
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