Special Issue "Plant Innate Immunity 2020"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mari-Anne Newman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C 1871, Denmark
Interests: plant immunity; Arabidopsis thaliana; Xanthomonas campestris; Pseudomonas syringae; zig-zag model; pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) or MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI); effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS); effector-triggered immunity (ETI); microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs); lipopolysaccharide (LPS); peptidoglycan (PGN); pattern recognition receptors (PRRs); bacterial and fungal effectors
Prof. Dr. David B. Collinge
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C 1871, Denmark
Interests: plant immunity; receptor-like protein kinases; NAC transcription factors; Hordeum vulgare; Arabidopsis thaliana; fungal effectors; mechanisms of biological control; endophytic fungi; Blumeria graminis; Fusarium head blight; Fusarium graminearum

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants are sessile organisms that are under constant attack from microbes. They rely on both preformed defences and their innate immune system to ward off pathogens. Preformed defences include, for example, the cell wall, which acts as a physical barrier to microbial invasion. The plant’s induced immune system is composed of a two-branched surveillance system, where the first branch is a relatively fast acting system comprising several general microbe elicitors, which allows plants to switch from growth and development into defence mode, thus rejecting most potentially harmful microbes. The general microbe elicitors, also called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), are recognized via plasma membrane localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and they lead to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). MAMPs are essential structures for microbe survival and are conserved among microbes. General elicitors like flagellin (Flg), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and Ax21 (Activator of XA21-mediated immunity in rice) from bacteria, fungal chitin, and β-glucans from oomycetes are recognized by plant surface localized PRRs. However, pathogens and other microbes (such as endophytes) have developed specialized effectors, which interfere with PTI, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS), where the pathogen proliferates in the plant and causes full blown disease. As a consequence of this selection pressure, some plants have developed resistance (R) genes that encode for intracellular receptors that recognize these effectors, either directly or indirectly. This leads to the second branch of plant immunity, effector-triggered immunity (ETI), and full resistance. This response is typically faster and stronger than PTI and often includes the hypersensitive response (HR).

This Special Issue focuses on the current knowledge on important MAMPs from bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, their structures, the plant PRRs that recognize them, and how they induce MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI or PTI) in plants. Until recently, the focus on plant–microbe interactions has been reaction, namely defence responses to pathogenic organisms. More recent research has focused on mutual signalling in symbiotic and neutral interactions, for instance, mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi, and these will also be included here.

Dr. Mari-Anne Newman
Prof. Dr. David B. Collinge
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • plant immunity
  • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Hordeum vulgare
  • Xanthomonas campestris
  • Pseudomonas syringae
  • Fusarium head blight
  • Blumeria graminis
  • Fusarium graminearum
  • endophytic fungi
  • zig-zag model
  • pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) or MAMP-triggered immunity (MTI)
  • effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS)
  • effector-triggered immunity (ETI)
  • microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)
  • lipopolysaccharide (LPS)
  • peptidoglycan (PGN)
  • pattern recognition receptors (PRRs)
  • bacterial and fungal effectors
  • receptor-like protein kinases
  • NAC transcription factors
  • mechanisms of biological control

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Diversity, Function and Regulation of Cell Surface and Intracellular Immune Receptors in Solanaceae
Plants 2020, 9(4), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040434 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1877
Abstract
The first layer of the plant immune system comprises plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins and intracellular receptors of the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein superfamily. Together, these immune receptors act as a network of surveillance machines in recognizing extracellular and intracellular pathogen invasion-derived molecules, ranging [...] Read more.
The first layer of the plant immune system comprises plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins and intracellular receptors of the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein superfamily. Together, these immune receptors act as a network of surveillance machines in recognizing extracellular and intracellular pathogen invasion-derived molecules, ranging from conserved structural epitopes to virulence-promoting effectors. Successful pathogen recognition leads to physiological and molecular changes in the host plants, which are critical for counteracting and defending against biotic attack. A breadth of significant insights and conceptual advances have been derived from decades of research in various model plant species regarding the structural complexity, functional diversity, and regulatory mechanisms of these plant immune receptors. In this article, we review the current state-of-the-art of how these host surveillance proteins function and how they are regulated. We will focus on the latest progress made in plant species belonging to the Solanaceae family, because of their tremendous importance as model organisms and agriculturally valuable crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Innate Immunity 2020)
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