Special Issue "Metabolomic and Morphological Adaptations of Forests under Climate Change"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elena Ormeño
Website
Guest Editor
Mediterranean Institute of Biodiversity and Ecology—CNRS, 13003 Marseille, France
Interests: plant ecology; plant ecophysiology; fire ecology; plant secondary metabolism; plant abiotic stress; global change
Dr. Silvano Fares
Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council, Institute of BioEconomy, Via dei Taurini 19, 00100 Rome, Italy
Interests: forest ecophysiology; plant environmental stress; environmental chemistry; oxidative stress; atmospheric physics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid climate changes, occurring naturally or due to human interventions, are well documented worldwide and include warming and drought (and the associated forest fires) or floods depending on the region. The capacity of single trees and shrubs or entire forest ecosystems to survive climate changes is thus critical to the maintenance of their ecological and social services. To face climate changes, forest species modulate their physiological functioning, eventually resulting in changes in their metabolome (production and composition) and morphology. These morpho-chemical modifications (in living plants and litter) are very diverse and include, non-exhaustively, plant growth, litter production, leaf density, tissue, trichome and stomata development and distribution, and production of both primary (e.g., lignin, primary antioxidants) and specific metabolites (e.g., phenolic compounds, terpenes).

Despite the vast amount of literature reporting metabolic and/or morphological modifications under climate change, several fundamental points remain poorly addressed, including the role of such modifications in forest health (CO2 uptake, oxidative pressure), their trade-offs, and metabolite localization as a mechanism to adapt to climate constraints.

This interdisciplinary Special Issue welcomes the submission of articles (original research papers, perspectives, hypotheses, opinions, reviews, modeling approaches, and methods) that tackle changes in metabolomic and/or morphological forest traits in response to climate change, with a focus on living and decomposing plant material, from the cell to the plant and population scales. Such changes can be discussed in the frame of plant health and adaptation to climate change, litter dynamics, or forest functioning as a whole. In addition to these fundamental ecophysiological aspects, this Special Issue welcomes contributions highlighting morpho-metabolomic changes in the context of applied environmental issues exacerbated by climate changes (air pollution, fire hazards), since the plant volatile metabolome is known to modify production of a certain number of air pollutants, and both traits are closely related to plant flammability.

Dr. Elena Ormeño
Dr. Silvano Fares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate adaptations
  • drought
  • flooding stress
  • warming
  • primary metabolites
  • secondary metabolism
  • omics
  • physical defenses
  • leaf imaging
  • trade-offs
  • plant health
  • vegetation flammability
  • canopy
  • litter
  • atmospheric pollution
  • forest fires

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Response of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to Climate Change: Transcriptome Assembly, Differential Gene Analysis and Targeted Metabolomics
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091149 - 04 Sep 2020
Abstract
Global change scenarios in the Mediterranean basin predict a precipitation reduction within the coming hundred years. Therefore, increased drought will affect forests both in terms of adaptive ecology and ecosystemic services. However, how vegetation might adapt to drought is poorly understood. In this [...] Read more.
Global change scenarios in the Mediterranean basin predict a precipitation reduction within the coming hundred years. Therefore, increased drought will affect forests both in terms of adaptive ecology and ecosystemic services. However, how vegetation might adapt to drought is poorly understood. In this report, four years of climate change was simulated by excluding 35% of precipitation above a downy oak forest. RNASeq data allowed us to assemble a genome-guided transcriptome. This led to the identification of differentially expressed features, which was supported by the characterization of target metabolites using a metabolomics approach. We provided 2.5 Tb of RNASeq data and the assembly of the first genome guided transcriptome of Quercus pubescens. Up to 5724 differentially expressed transcripts were obtained; 42 involved in plant response to drought. Transcript set enrichment analysis showed that drought induces an increase in oxidative pressure that is mitigated by the upregulation of ubiquitin-like protein protease, ferrochelatase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and oxo-acid-lyase activities. Furthermore, the downregulation of auxin biosynthesis and transport, carbohydrate storage metabolism were observed as well as the concomitant accumulation of metabolites, such as oxalic acid, malate and isocitrate. Our data suggest that early metabolic changes in the resistance of Q. pubescens to drought involve a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle shunt through the glyoxylate pathway, galactose metabolism by reducing carbohydrate storage and increased proteolytic activity. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Downy oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) response to climate change: transcriptome assembly, differential genes analysis and targeted metabolomics.
Authors: Jean-Philippe MEVY; Beatrice Loriod; Xi Liu; Erwan Corre; Magali Torres; Michael Büttner; Anne Haguenauer; Ilja Marco Reiter; Catherine Fernandez; Thierry Gauquelin
Affiliation: Aix-Marseille université IMBE
Abstract: Global change scenarios in Mediterranean basin predict a precipitation reduction within the coming hundred years. Therefore, increase drought will affect forests both in terms of adaptive ecology and exosystemic services. However, how vegetation might adapt to drought is poorly understood. In this report, four years climate change was simulated by excluding 35% of precipitation above a downy oak forest. RNASeq data allowed to assemble a genome guided transcriptome. This led to the identification of differentially expressed features which was supported by the characterization of target metabolites using a metabolomics approach. We provided 2.5 Tb of RNASeq data and the assembly of the first genome guided transcriptome of Quercus pubescens. Up to 5724 differentially expressed transcripts were obtained; 42 involved in plant response to drought. Transcript set enrichment analysis showed that drought induces an increase oxidative pressure that is mitigated by the upregulation of ubiquitin-like protein protease, ferrochelatase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and oxo-acid-lyase activities. Also, the down regulation of auxin biosynthesis and transport, carbohydrate storage metabolism were observed as well as the concomitant accumulation of metabolites as oxalic acid, malate and isocitrate. Our data suggest that early metabolic changes of Q. pubescens resistance to drought involve a TCA cycle shunt through the glyoxylate pathway, galactose metabolism by reducing carbohydrates storage and increase proteolytic activity.

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