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Article

Response of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to Climate Change: Transcriptome Assembly, Differential Gene Analysis and Targeted Metabolomics

1
CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Avignon University, IRD, IMBE, 13331 Marseille, France
2
TGML-TAGC—Inserm UMR1090 Aix-Marseille Université 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille, France
3
CNRS, Sorbonne Université, FR2424, ABiMS platform, Station Biologique, 29680 Roscoff, France
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Metabolomics Core Technology Platform Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Im Neuenheimer Feld 360, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
5
Research Federation ECCOREV FR3098, CNRS, 13545 Aix-en-Provence, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091149
Received: 20 July 2020 / Revised: 20 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 4 September 2020
Global change scenarios in the Mediterranean basin predict a precipitation reduction within the coming hundred years. Therefore, increased drought will affect forests both in terms of adaptive ecology and ecosystemic services. However, how vegetation might adapt to drought is poorly understood. In this report, four years of climate change was simulated by excluding 35% of precipitation above a downy oak forest. RNASeq data allowed us to assemble a genome-guided transcriptome. This led to the identification of differentially expressed features, which was supported by the characterization of target metabolites using a metabolomics approach. We provided 2.5 Tb of RNASeq data and the assembly of the first genome guided transcriptome of Quercus pubescens. Up to 5724 differentially expressed transcripts were obtained; 42 involved in plant response to drought. Transcript set enrichment analysis showed that drought induces an increase in oxidative pressure that is mitigated by the upregulation of ubiquitin-like protein protease, ferrochelatase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and oxo-acid-lyase activities. Furthermore, the downregulation of auxin biosynthesis and transport, carbohydrate storage metabolism were observed as well as the concomitant accumulation of metabolites, such as oxalic acid, malate and isocitrate. Our data suggest that early metabolic changes in the resistance of Q. pubescens to drought involve a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle shunt through the glyoxylate pathway, galactose metabolism by reducing carbohydrate storage and increased proteolytic activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: transcriptome analysis; metabolism; drought; Quercus pubescens; adaptation; RNASeq transcriptome analysis; metabolism; drought; Quercus pubescens; adaptation; RNASeq
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mevy, J.-P.; Loriod, B.; Liu, X.; Corre, E.; Torres, M.; Büttner, M.; Haguenauer, A.; Reiter, I.M.; Fernandez, C.; Gauquelin, T. Response of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to Climate Change: Transcriptome Assembly, Differential Gene Analysis and Targeted Metabolomics. Plants 2020, 9, 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091149

AMA Style

Mevy J-P, Loriod B, Liu X, Corre E, Torres M, Büttner M, Haguenauer A, Reiter IM, Fernandez C, Gauquelin T. Response of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to Climate Change: Transcriptome Assembly, Differential Gene Analysis and Targeted Metabolomics. Plants. 2020; 9(9):1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091149

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mevy, Jean-Philippe, Beatrice Loriod, Xi Liu, Erwan Corre, Magali Torres, Michael Büttner, Anne Haguenauer, Ilja M. Reiter, Catherine Fernandez, and Thierry Gauquelin. 2020. "Response of Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to Climate Change: Transcriptome Assembly, Differential Gene Analysis and Targeted Metabolomics" Plants 9, no. 9: 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091149

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