Special Issue "Insights into Ethnobotanical Research: Linking Tradition, Innovation, and Sustainability "

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ana Maria Carvalho
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Escola Superior Agrária (ESAB) & Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal.
Interests: ethnobotany; agroecology; plant resources conservation; sustainability; innovation and rural development

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

This Special Issue will promote multidisciplinary approaches to applied plant science, focusing plants, environment, sustainable uses, and people (e.g., human interaction with plants, history, heritage, culture, sovereignty, and well-being), as well as linking traditional/local plant-use to innovation and sustainable development.

Scope:

  • Agroecology, low-input farming systems, genetic diversity, sustainable harvesting and production, food security and sovereignty, sustainable development.
  • Biobased materials towards sustainability
  • Ethnobotany, documented species, and uses, botanical identification, reference collections, plant categorization
  • Ethnopharmacology, pharmacological, and toxicological activities of species used for health purposes.
  • Plant science, plant diversity and conservation strategies for sustainable management and multicultural societies.
  • Plant biology and biochemistry, ecophysiology
  • Systematics, taxonomy, and classification, biogeography of plant

We invite scientists and researchers to provide new insights into ethnobotanical research focusing on socio-cultural and multiple evidence bases for plant resource management and conservation, agricultural innovation, natural products research, and sustainable development.

Prof. Dr. Ana Maria Carvalho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)
  • Wild foods
  • Medicinal plants
  • Plant use dynamics
  • Natural products
  • Tradition vs. innovation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ethnomedicinal Plant Knowledge of the Karen in Thailand
Plants 2020, 9(7), 813; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070813 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The Thai Karen, the largest hill-tribe in Thailand, guard substantial ethnomedicinal plant knowledge, as documented in several studies that targeted single villages. Here, we have compiled information from all the reliable and published sources to present a comprehensive overview of the Karen ethnomedicinal [...] Read more.
The Thai Karen, the largest hill-tribe in Thailand, guard substantial ethnomedicinal plant knowledge, as documented in several studies that targeted single villages. Here, we have compiled information from all the reliable and published sources to present a comprehensive overview of the Karen ethnomedicinal plant knowledge. Our dataset covers 31 Karen villages distributed over eight provinces in Thailand. We used the Cultural Importance Index (CI) to determine which species were the most valuable to the Karen and the Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) to evaluate how well distributed the knowledge of ethnomedicinal plants was in various medicinal use categories. In the 31 Karen villages, we found 3188 reports of ethnomedicinal plant uses of 732 species in 150 plant families. Chromolaena odorata, Biancaea sappan, and Tinospora crispa were the most important medicinal plants, with the highest CI values. The Leguminosae, Asteraceae, Zingiberaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Lamiaceae, Acanthaceae, Apocynaceae, and Menispermaceae were the families with the highest CI values in the mentioned order. A high proportion of all the 3188 Karen use reports were used to treat digestive, general and unspecified, musculoskeletal, and skin disorders. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Traditional Uses of Medicinal Plants by Ethnic People in the Kavrepalanchok District, Central Nepal
Plants 2020, 9(6), 759; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9060759 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
In rural areas of Nepal, where it is difficult to get access to Government health care facilities, people depend on medicinal plants and local healers for health problems. This study concerns an ethnobotanical survey of the Kavrepalanchok District, reporting some unusual uses of [...] Read more.
In rural areas of Nepal, where it is difficult to get access to Government health care facilities, people depend on medicinal plants and local healers for health problems. This study concerns an ethnobotanical survey of the Kavrepalanchok District, reporting some unusual uses of medicinal plants and original recipes. A total of 32 informants were interviewed, 24 of them being key informants. Ethnobotanical uses concerned 116 taxa, of which 101 were medicinal plants, with the most representative species belonging to Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, and Zingiberaceae. Ethnobotanical indexes were used to evaluate the ethnopharmacological importance of each plant species and the degree of agreement among the informants’ knowledge. Informant consensus factor (Fic) showed that the fever category had the greatest agreement. Highest fidelity level (FL) values were found for Calotropis gigantea used for dermatological diseases, Drymaria cordata for fever, Mangifera indica and Wrightia arborea for gastrointestinal disorders. Data document the richness of the local flora and the traditional knowledge on medicinal plant species used by ethnic communities in rural areas. The active involvement of local populations in the conservation and management of medicinal plant species will encourage future projects for the sustainable development of the biological and cultural diversity of these rural areas of Nepal. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Ethnobotanical Survey of Plants Used for Treating Cough Associated with Respiratory Conditions in Ede South Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria
Plants 2020, 9(5), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050647 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
In many developing countries, community members depend on their local flora for treating diverse ailments including those affecting the respiratory system. This is often attributed to the high cost and limited access to health care facilities. This present study focused on the documentation [...] Read more.
In many developing countries, community members depend on their local flora for treating diverse ailments including those affecting the respiratory system. This is often attributed to the high cost and limited access to health care facilities. This present study focused on the documentation of plant species used against cough associated with the respiratory diseases in Ede South Local Government Area of Osun State. The survey was conducted using semi-structured interviews among 100 participants. Information obtained was analyzed using different ethno-botanical indices including relative frequency of citation (RFC) and fidelity level (FL). A total of 87 plant species from 39 families, which was mostly represented by Fabaceae, were reported in the study area. Crinum jagus was the most popular plant used against cough and approximately 32% of the plants have been reported as cough remedies for the first time. However, some of the documented plants have been reported for the treatment of cough and related respiratory diseases in several countries. In terms of the life-form, trees constituted the highest proportion of the medicinal plants (37%), while leaves (36%) were the predominant plant part prescribed for cough. Decoction was the main method of preparing the plants, which were all administered orally. Approximately 63% of the plants were exclusively sourced from the wild. The current study revealed the richness and widespread use of plant species for managing cough associated with respiratory diseases in the study area. The generated inventory contributes to the expanding database of valuable plant resources with medicinal potential in Nigeria and Africa. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Traditional uses of medicinal plants by ethnic people in the Kavrepalanchowk District, Central Nepal.
Authors: G. Ambu, Ram P. Chaudary, M. Mariotti, L. Cornara
Affiliation: Università degli Studi di Genova, Genoa, Italy
Abstract: In Nepal, traditional knowledge about the use of medicinal plants has been transmitted orally through the families and the practices of traditional healers. In rural areas of the Nepal it is difficult to access to Government health care facilities and people highly depend on medicinal plants and local healers for health problems. Nevertheless, the traditional ethnobotany knowledge of Kavrepalanchowk District has not yet been fully explored. In the present study a total of 32 informants were interviewed, 24 of them being key informants (shamans, local healers, farmers and plant traders). Recorded ethnobotanical uses concerned 116 taxa, of which 101 (with 271 citations) were medicinal plants including 37 herbs, 26 trees, 25 shrubs and other (climbers, parasitic, ferns). The most representative species belonged to Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae and Zingiberaceae, mainly used to treat fever, digestive system, skeletal and muscular system and skin diseases. Ethnobotanical indexes were used to evaluate the ethnopharmacological importance of each plant species and the degree of agreement among the informants’ knowledge. Informant consensus factor (Fic) showed that the fever category had the greatest agreement, followed by gastrointestinal and dermatological categories. Highest fidelity level (FL) values were found for Calotropis gigantea in the treatment of dermatological diseases, Drymaria cordata to treat fever, Mangifera indica and Wrightia arborea for gastrointestinal disorders. Data collected document the richness of the local flora and the traditional knowledge on medicinal plant use by ethnic communities in the rural areas of Nepal. In this perspective, the active involvement of local populations in the conservation and management of precious medicinal plants will encourage future projects for the sustainable development of the biological and cultural diversity of these rural areas of Nepal.

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