Special Issue "Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Barbara Hawrylak-Nowak
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Guest Editor
Unit of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Environmental Biology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka 15 st.20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; mineral nutrition; stress response and resistance; trace elements; plant ecophysiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Renata Matraszek-Gawron
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 15 Akademicka Street, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; mineral nutrition; abiotic stress tolerance; trace metals; biological active compounds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sławomir Dresler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biological Science, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Akademicka 13 st. 20-033 Lublin, 20-033 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; secondary metabolites; plant environmental stress physiology; metal phytotoxicity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the era of the current climate change and the rapid increase in food demand for the ever-growing human population, there is a serious problem with the provision of so-called food safety. Both insufficient crop production and the frequently poor nutritional value of food have become vital global concerns affecting billions of people worldwide. However, it seems that there is a growing belief that various agronomic treatments and new technologies can prevent the consequences of the warming climate and increasingly unpredictable weather patterns. Along with global warming, many abiotic stress factors that threaten the sustainability of agriculture and ecosystems are seemingly intensifying. Therefore, over the last few decades, abiotic stresses have become an important topic of concern for plant scientists. To survive time-bound or chronic unfavourable environmental changes, plants must possess some resistance and tolerance mechanisms at the cellular, organ, and whole organism levels. Their proper functioning largely depends on adequate mineral nutrition. It is well known that essential nutrients play specific and crucial roles in normal plant growth, development, and stress resistance. Sometimes, an elevated concentration of nutrients in the substrate/plant tissues positively modifies plants’ responses to stress and simultaneously increases their nutritional value. Similarly, some beneficial elements (especially Si and Se) used at low concentrations can positively influence plant metabolism and contribute to increased resistance to detrimental environmental changes. For this reason, a large number of elements in their various chemical forms have been examined as enhancers of plant abiotic stress resistance, including essential and beneficial elements. Some of them have a very promising potential to increase the quantity and quality of yield under stress.

Since the response of plants to various abiotic factors is multifaceted at physiological, biochemical, and genetic levels, the influence of mineral elements on many aspects of plant biology can be considered. This Special Issue aims to highlight new developments in our understanding of how mineral nutrition and the mineral status of plants contribute to their resistance to different environmental stresses.

Contributions to this Special Issue are invited from all scientists dealing with plant biology, including molecular biology, plant physiology, crop breeding, and environment/ecological perspectives. We hope these articles will bring this subject to the attention of a wide range of readers, not only scientists but also experts and practitioners.

Dr. Barbara Hawrylak-Nowak
Dr. Renata Matraszek-Gawron
Dr. Sławomir Dresler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Beneficial elements
  • Drought
  • Macronutrients
  • Malnutrition
  • Mechanical damage
  • Micronutrients
  • Nutrient mobility and translocation
  • Nutritional value of crops
  • Oxidative stress
  • Plant mineral status
  • Salt stress
  • Stress resistance
  • Thermal stress
  • Trace elements
  • Trace metal/metalloid stress
  • UV stress
  • Xenobiotics.

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Ambient and Elevated [CO2] in Low Light Levels on Growth, Physiology and Nutrient Uptake of Tropical Perennial Legume Cover Crops
Plants 2021, 10(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020193 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 418
Abstract
At early stages of establishment of tropical plantation crops, inclusion of legume cover crops could reduce soil degradation due to erosion and nutrient leaching. As understory plants these cover crops receive limited irradiance and can be subjected to elevated CO2 at ground [...] Read more.
At early stages of establishment of tropical plantation crops, inclusion of legume cover crops could reduce soil degradation due to erosion and nutrient leaching. As understory plants these cover crops receive limited irradiance and can be subjected to elevated CO2 at ground level. A glasshouse experiment was undertaken to assess the effects of ambient (450 µmol mol−1) and elevated (700 µmol mol−1) levels of [CO2] on growth, physiological changes and nutrient uptake of six perennial legume cover crops (Perennial Peanut, Ea-Ea, Mucuna, Pigeon pea, Lab lab, Cowpea) under low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD; 100, 200, and 400 µmol m−2 s−1). Overall, total and root dry biomass, total root length, specific leaf area, and relative growth rates were significantly influenced by levels of [CO2] and PPFD and cover crop species. With few exceptions, all the cover crops showed significant effects of [CO2], PPFD, and species on net photosynthesis (PN) and its components, such as stomatal conductance (gs) internal CO2 conc. (Ci), and transpiration (E). Increasing [CO2], from 450 to 700 μmol mol−1 and increasing PPFD from 100 to 400 μmol ּm−2 ּs−1 increased PN. Overall, the levels of [CO2], PPFD and species significantly affected total water use efficiency (WUETOTAL), instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEINST) and intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEINTR). With some exceptions, increasing levels of [CO2] and PPFD increased all the WUE parameters. Interspecific differences were observed with respect to macro-micro nutrient uptake and use efficiency. With a few exceptions, increasing levels of [CO2] from 450 to 700 μmol mol−1 and PPFD from 100 to 400 μmol m−2 s−1 increased nutrient use efficiency (NUE) of all nutrients by cover crop species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
Article
Use of Leaves as Bioindicator to Assess Air Pollution Based on Composite Proxy Measure (APTI), Dust Amount and Elemental Concentration of Metals
Plants 2020, 9(12), 1743; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121743 - 09 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 776
Abstract
Monitoring air pollution and environmental health are crucial to ensure viable cities. We assessed the usefulness of the Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) as a composite index of environmental health. Fine and coarse dust amount and elemental concentrations of Celtis occidentalis and Tilia [...] Read more.
Monitoring air pollution and environmental health are crucial to ensure viable cities. We assessed the usefulness of the Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) as a composite index of environmental health. Fine and coarse dust amount and elemental concentrations of Celtis occidentalis and Tilia × europaea leaves were measured in June and September at three sampling sites (urban, industrial, and rural) in Debrecen city (Hungary) to assess the usefulness of APTI. The correlation between APTI values and dust amount and elemental concentrations was also studied. Fine dust, total chlorophyll, and elemental concentrations were the most sensitive indicators of pollution. Based on the high chlorophyll and low elemental concentration of tree leaves, the rural site was the least disturbed by anthropogenic activities, as expected. We demonstrated that fine and coarse dust amount and elemental concentrations of urban tree leaves are especially useful for urban air quality monitoring. Correlations between APTI and other measured parameters were also found. Both C. occidentalis and T. europaea were sensitive to air pollution based on their APTI values. Thus, the APTI of tree leaves is an especially useful proxy measure of air pollution, as well as environmental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Opportunities for Increased Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Wheat for Forage Use
Plants 2020, 9(12), 1738; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121738 - 09 Dec 2020
Viewed by 583
Abstract
Wheat is a major cool-season forage crop in the southern United States. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of nitrogen (N) fertilization on wheat biomass yield, quality, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), and nitrogen nutrition index (NNI). The experiments were [...] Read more.
Wheat is a major cool-season forage crop in the southern United States. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of nitrogen (N) fertilization on wheat biomass yield, quality, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), and nitrogen nutrition index (NNI). The experiments were conducted in a greenhouse and a hoop house in a split-plot design, with three replications. Twenty wheat cultivars/lines were evaluated at four N rates (0, 75, 150, and 300 mg N.kg−1 soil) in the greenhouse and (0, 50, 100, and 200 mg N.kg−1 soil) in the hoop house. In general, high-NUE lines had lower crude protein content than the low-NUE lines. None of the cultivars/lines reached a plateau for biomass production or crude protein at the highest N rate. The line × N rate interaction for NUE was not significant in the greenhouse (p = 0.854) but was highly significant in the hoop house (p < 0.001). NNI had a negative correlation with NUE and biomass. NUE had strong positive correlations with shoot biomass and total biomass but low to moderate correlations with root biomass. NUE also had a strong positive correlation with N uptake efficiency. Lines with high NUE can be used in breeding programs to enhance NUE in wheat for forage use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Desert Soil Microbes as a Mineral Nutrient Acquisition Tool for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) Productivity at Different Moisture Regimes
Plants 2020, 9(12), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9121629 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 498
Abstract
Drought is a major constraint in drylands for crop production. Plant associated microbes can help plants in acquisition of soil nutrients to enhance productivity in stressful conditions. The current study was designed to illuminate the effectiveness of desert rhizobacterial strains on growth and [...] Read more.
Drought is a major constraint in drylands for crop production. Plant associated microbes can help plants in acquisition of soil nutrients to enhance productivity in stressful conditions. The current study was designed to illuminate the effectiveness of desert rhizobacterial strains on growth and net-return of chickpeas grown in pots by using sandy loam soil of Thal Pakistan desert. A total of 125 rhizobacterial strains were isolated, out of which 72 strains were inoculated with chickpeas in the growth chamber for 75 days to screen most efficient isolates. Amongst all, six bacterial strains (two rhizobia and four plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains) significantly enhanced nodulation and shoot-root length as compared to other treatments. These promising strains were morphologically and biochemically characterized and identified through 16sRNA sequencing. Then, eight consortia of the identified isolates were formulated to evaluate the growth and development of chickpea at three moisture levels (55%, 75% and 95% of field capacity) in a glass house experiment. The trend for best performing consortia in terms of growth and development of chickpea remained T2 at moisture level 1 > T7 at moisture level 2 > T4 at moisture level 3. The present study indicates the vital role of co-inoculated bacterial strains in growth enhancement of chickpea under low moisture availability. It is concluded from the results that the consortium T2 (Mesorhizobium ciceri RZ-11 + Bacillus subtilis RP-01 + Bacillus mojavensis RS-14) can perform best in drought conditions (55% field capacity) and T4 (Mesorhizobium ciceri RZ-11 + Enterobacter Cloacae RP-08 + Providencia vermicola RS-15) can be adopted in irrigated areas (95% field capacity) for maximum productivity of chickpea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
134Cs Uptake and Growth at Various Cs+ and K+ Levels in Arabidopsis AtKUP7 Mutants
Plants 2020, 9(11), 1525; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9111525 - 09 Nov 2020
Viewed by 472
Abstract
Radiocaesium is a pollutant with a high risk for the environment, agricultural production, and human health. It is mobile in ecosystems and can be taken up by plants via potassium transporters. In this study, we focused on the role of potassium transporter AtKUP7 [...] Read more.
Radiocaesium is a pollutant with a high risk for the environment, agricultural production, and human health. It is mobile in ecosystems and can be taken up by plants via potassium transporters. In this study, we focused on the role of potassium transporter AtKUP7 of the KT/HAK/KUP family in Cs+ and K+ uptake by plants and in plant tolerance to caesium toxicity. We detected that Arabidopsiskup7 mutant accumulates significantly lower amounts of 134Cs in the root (86%) and in the shoot (69%) compared to the wild-type. On the other hand ability of the mutant to grow on media with toxic (100 and 200 µM) concentrations of Cs+ was not changed; moreover its growth was not impaired on low K+. We further investigated another mutant line in AtKUP7 and found that the growth phenotype of the kup7 mutants in K+ deficient conditions is much milder than previously published. Also, their accumulation of K+ in shoots is hindered only by severe potassium shortage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Integrative Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis Identifies Major Molecular Regulation Pathways Involved in Ramie (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich) under Nitrogen and Water Co-Limitation
Plants 2020, 9(10), 1267; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101267 - 25 Sep 2020
Viewed by 633
Abstract
Water and N are the most important factors affecting ramie (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich) growth. In this study, de novo transcriptome assembly and Tandem Mass Tags (TMT) based quantitative proteome analysis of ramie under nitrogen and water co-limitation conditions were performed, and [...] Read more.
Water and N are the most important factors affecting ramie (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich) growth. In this study, de novo transcriptome assembly and Tandem Mass Tags (TMT) based quantitative proteome analysis of ramie under nitrogen and water co-limitation conditions were performed, and exposed to treatments, including drought and N-deficit (WdNd), proper water but N-deficit (WNd), proper N but drought (WdN), and proper N and water (CK), respectively. A total of 64,848 unigenes (41.92% of total unigenes) were annotated in at least one database, including NCBI non-redundant protein sequences (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Protein family (Pfam), Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG Orthology (KO), and 4268 protein groups were identified. Most significant changes in transcript levels happened under water-limited conditions, but most significant changes in protein level happened under water-limited conditions only with proper N. Poor correlation between differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) was observed in ramie responding to the treatments. DEG/DEP regulation patterns related to major metabolic processes responding to water and N deficiency were analyzed, including photosynthesis, ethylene responding, glycolysis, and nitrogen metabolism. Moreover, 41 DEGs and 61 DEPs involved in regulating adaptation of ramie under water and N stresses were provided in the study, including DEGs/DEPs related to UDP—glucuronosyhransferase (UGT), ATP synthase, and carbonate dehydratase. The strong dependency of N-response of ramie on water conditions at the gene and protein levels was highlighted. Advices for simultaneously improving water and N efficiency in ramie were also provided, especially in breeding N efficient varieties with drought resistance. This study provided extensive new information on the transcriptome, proteome, their correlation, and diversification in ramie responding to water and N co-limitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Potassium Application Boosts Photosynthesis and Sorbitol Biosynthesis and Accelerates Cold Acclimation of Common Plantain (Plantago major L.)
Plants 2020, 9(10), 1259; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101259 - 24 Sep 2020
Viewed by 609
Abstract
Potassium (K) is essential for the processes critical for plant performance, including photosynthesis, carbon assimilation, and response to stress. K also influences translocation of sugars in the phloem and regulates sucrose metabolism. Several plant species synthesize polyols and transport these sugar alcohols from [...] Read more.
Potassium (K) is essential for the processes critical for plant performance, including photosynthesis, carbon assimilation, and response to stress. K also influences translocation of sugars in the phloem and regulates sucrose metabolism. Several plant species synthesize polyols and transport these sugar alcohols from source to sink tissues. Limited knowledge exists about the involvement of K in the above processes in polyol-translocating plants. We, therefore, studied K effects in Plantago major, a species that accumulates the polyol sorbitol to high concentrations. We grew P. major plants on soil substrate adjusted to low-, medium-, or high-potassium conditions. We found that biomass, seed yield, and leaf tissue K contents increased in a soil K-dependent manner. K gradually increased the photosynthetic efficiency and decreased the non-photochemical quenching. Concomitantly, sorbitol levels and sorbitol to sucrose ratio in leaves and phloem sap increased in a K-dependent manner. K supply also fostered plant cold acclimation. High soil K levels mitigated loss of water from leaves in the cold and supported cold-dependent sugar and sorbitol accumulation. We hypothesize that with increased K nutrition, P. major preferentially channels photosynthesis-derived electrons into sorbitol biosynthesis and that this increased sorbitol is supportive for sink development and as a protective solute, during abiotic stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Water Shortage Strongly Alters Formation of Calcium Oxalate Druse Crystals and Leaf Traits in Fagopyrum esculentum
Plants 2020, 9(7), 917; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070917 - 20 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 868
Abstract
Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) is a robust plant with high resistance to different environmental constraints. It contains high levels of calcium oxalate (CaOx) druse crystals, although their role remains obscure. The objective was to examine the effects of water shortage on [...] Read more.
Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) is a robust plant with high resistance to different environmental constraints. It contains high levels of calcium oxalate (CaOx) druse crystals, although their role remains obscure. The objective was to examine the effects of water shortage on plant biomass partition and leaf traits and formation of CaOx druse crystals in common buckwheat. Buckwheat plants were exposed to favorable and reduced water availability for 28 days. The element composition and morphological, biochemical, physiological and optical traits of the leaves, and the plant biomass were investigated under these conditions. Measurements of photochemical efficiency of photosystem II showed undisturbed functioning for buckwheat exposed to water shortage, apparently due to partially closed stomata and more efficient water regulation. Strong relationships were seen between water-related parameters and Ca, Mn and S content, and size and density of CaOx druse crystals. Redundancy analysis revealed the importance of the size of CaOx druse crystals to explain reflection in the UV range. Water shortage resulted in shorter plants with the same leaf mass (i.e., increased mass:height ratio), which, together with denser leaf tissue and higher content of photosynthetic pigments and protective substances, provides an advantage under extreme weather conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Nutritional Value of Savory Herb (Satureja hortensis L.) and Plant Response to Variable Mineral Nutrition Conditions in Various Phases of Development
Plants 2020, 9(6), 706; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9060706 - 01 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 967
Abstract
Mineral nutrition and plant ontogeny influence both the physiological balance between nutrients in a plant and determine the proper nutritional status of a plant, which is necessary to realize the yielding potential of a cultivated species. The aim of the present study was [...] Read more.
Mineral nutrition and plant ontogeny influence both the physiological balance between nutrients in a plant and determine the proper nutritional status of a plant, which is necessary to realize the yielding potential of a cultivated species. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of nitrogen doses (0, 4, 8, 12, 16 g N·m−2) and plant development phases (the beginning and full flowering) on the content of macroelements and changes in ionic ratios occurring in the herb of the summer savory cv. ‘Saturn’. The two-factor experiment was carried out in a random-block design with five replications. The mineral nitrogen nutrition applied increased the concentration of total nitrogen and its mineral forms in the plants. There was a change in ion homeostasis in the individual stages of the ontogenesis process, i.e., a higher content of P, K, Ca, and S in the initial flowering phase as well as Mg and Cl in the full flowering phase. The increase in the availability of mineral nitrogen in the soil solution caused a decrease in total sorption capacity, reducing the potential of the soil for saturation with alkaline cations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
NH4+ Toxicity, Which Is Mainly Determined by the High NH4+/K+ Ratio, Is Alleviated by CIPK23 in Arabidopsis
Plants 2020, 9(4), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040501 - 14 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Ammonium (NH4+) toxicity is always accompanied by ion imbalances, and NH4+ and potassium (K+) exhibit a competitive correlation in their uptake and transport processes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the typical leaf chlorosis phenotype in the knockout [...] Read more.
Ammonium (NH4+) toxicity is always accompanied by ion imbalances, and NH4+ and potassium (K+) exhibit a competitive correlation in their uptake and transport processes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the typical leaf chlorosis phenotype in the knockout mutant of calcineurin B-like interacting protein kinase 23 (CIPK23) is high-NH4+-dependent under low-K+ condition. However, the correlation of K+ and NH4+ in the occurrence of leaf chlorosis in the cipk23 mutant has not been deeply elucidated. Here, a modified hydroponic experimental system with different gradients of NH4+ and K+ was applied. Comparative treatments showed that NH4+ toxicity, which is triggered mainly by the high ratio of NH4+ to K+ (NH4+/K+ ≥ 10:1 for cipk23) but not by the absolute concentrations of the ions, results in leaf chlorosis. Under high NH4+/K+ ratios, CIPK23 is upregulated abundantly in leaves and roots, which efficiently reduces the leaf chlorosis by regulating the contents of NH4+ and K+ in plant shoots, while promoting the elongation of primary and lateral roots. Physiological data were obtained to further confirm the role CIPK23 in alleviating NH4+ toxicity. Taken all together, CIPK23 might function in different tissues to reduce stress-induced NH4+ toxicity associated with high NH4+/K+ ratios by regulating the NH4+–K+ balance in Arabidopsis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
Selenium and Salt Interactions in Black Gram (Vigna mungo L): Ion Uptake, Antioxidant Defense System, and Photochemistry Efficiency
Plants 2020, 9(4), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040467 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1128
Abstract
Salinity is a major abiotic stress which limits crop production, especially under rainfed conditions. Selenium (Se), as an important micronutrient, plays a vital role in mitigating detrimental effects of different abiotic stresses. The objective of this research was to examine the effect of [...] Read more.
Salinity is a major abiotic stress which limits crop production, especially under rainfed conditions. Selenium (Se), as an important micronutrient, plays a vital role in mitigating detrimental effects of different abiotic stresses. The objective of this research was to examine the effect of Se fertilization on black gram (Vigna mungo) under salt stress. Our results showed that salt stress (100 mM NaCl) in leaves significantly induced oxidative damage and caused a decline in relative water content, chlorophyll (Chl), stomatal conductance (gs), photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), sucrose, and reducing sugars. A low dose of Se (1.5 ppm) significantly reduced hydrogen peroxide content, malondialdehyde formation, cell membrane damage, and also improved antioxidative enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase under salt stress. Se-treated plants exhibited higher Chl, gs, Fv/Fm, sucrose, and reducing sugars than untreated plants in response to salt stress. In addition, Se application enhanced Se uptake and reduced Na+ uptake, but Cl remained unaffected. Our results indicated that a low dose of Se effectively alleviated salt damage via inhibition of Na+ uptake and enhanced antioxidant defense resulting in a significant decrease in oxidative damage, and maintained gaseous exchange and PS II function for sucrose and reducing sugars accumulation in black gram. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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Article
High Nitrogen Enhance Drought Tolerance in Cotton through Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities, Nitrogen Metabolism and Osmotic Adjustment
Plants 2020, 9(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020178 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1253
Abstract
Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses and hampers many plant physiological processes under suboptimal nitrogen (N) concentration. Seedling tolerance to drought stress is very important for optimum growth and development, however, the enhancement of plant stress tolerance through N application [...] Read more.
Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses and hampers many plant physiological processes under suboptimal nitrogen (N) concentration. Seedling tolerance to drought stress is very important for optimum growth and development, however, the enhancement of plant stress tolerance through N application in cotton is not fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the role of high N concentration in enhancing drought stress tolerance in cotton. A hydroponic experiment supplying low (0.25 mM) and high (5 mM) N concentrations, followed by 150 g L−1 polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced stress was conducted in a growth chamber. PEG-induced drought stress inhibited seedling growth, led to oxidative stress from excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) generation, and reduced N metabolism. High N concentrations alleviated oxidative damage and stomatal limitation by increasing antioxidant enzymatic activities, leaf relative water content, and photosynthesis in cotton seedlings under drought stress. The results revealed that the ameliorative effects of high N concentration may be ascribed to the enhancement of N metabolizing enzymes and an increase in the amounts of osmoprotectants like free amino acids and total soluble protein. The present data suggest that relatively high N concentrations may contribute to drought stress tolerance in cotton through N metabolism, antioxidant capacity, and osmotic adjustment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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