Special Issue "Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Barbara Hawrylak-Nowak
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Guest Editor
Unit of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Environmental Biology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka 15 st.20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; mineral nutrition; stress response and resistance; trace elements; plant ecophysiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Renata Matraszek-Gawron
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Environmental Biology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka 15 st. 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; mineral nutrition; abiotic stress tolerance; trace metals; biological active compounds
Dr. Sławomir Dresler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biological Science, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Akademicka 13 st. 20-033 Lublin, 20-033 Lublin, Poland
Interests: plant physiology; secondary metabolites; plant environmental stress physiology; metal phytotoxicity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the era of the current climate change and the rapid increase in food demand for the ever-growing human population, there is a serious problem with the provision of so-called food safety. Both insufficient crop production and the frequently poor nutritional value of food have become vital global concerns affecting billions of people worldwide. However, it seems that there is a growing belief that various agronomic treatments and new technologies can prevent the consequences of the warming climate and increasingly unpredictable weather patterns. Along with global warming, many abiotic stress factors that threaten the sustainability of agriculture and ecosystems are seemingly intensifying. Therefore, over the last few decades, abiotic stresses have become an important topic of concern for plant scientists. To survive time-bound or chronic unfavourable environmental changes, plants must possess some resistance and tolerance mechanisms at the cellular, organ, and whole organism levels. Their proper functioning largely depends on adequate mineral nutrition. It is well known that essential nutrients play specific and crucial roles in normal plant growth, development, and stress resistance. Sometimes, an elevated concentration of nutrients in the substrate/plant tissues positively modifies plants’ responses to stress and simultaneously increases their nutritional value. Similarly, some beneficial elements (especially Si and Se) used at low concentrations can positively influence plant metabolism and contribute to increased resistance to detrimental environmental changes. For this reason, a large number of elements in their various chemical forms have been examined as enhancers of plant abiotic stress resistance, including essential and beneficial elements. Some of them have a very promising potential to increase the quantity and quality of yield under stress.

Since the response of plants to various abiotic factors is multifaceted at physiological, biochemical, and genetic levels, the influence of mineral elements on many aspects of plant biology can be considered. This Special Issue aims to highlight new developments in our understanding of how mineral nutrition and the mineral status of plants contribute to their resistance to different environmental stresses.

Contributions to this Special Issue are invited from all scientists dealing with plant biology, including molecular biology, plant physiology, crop breeding, and environment/ecological perspectives. We hope these articles will bring this subject to the attention of a wide range of readers, not only scientists but also experts and practitioners.

Dr. Barbara Hawrylak-Nowak
Dr. Renata Matraszek-Gawron
Dr. Sławomir Dresler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Beneficial elements
  • Drought
  • Macronutrients
  • Malnutrition
  • Mechanical damage
  • Micronutrients
  • Nutrient mobility and translocation
  • Nutritional value of crops
  • Oxidative stress
  • Plant mineral status
  • Salt stress
  • Stress resistance
  • Thermal stress
  • Trace elements
  • Trace metal/metalloid stress
  • UV stress
  • Xenobiotics.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
High Nitrogen Enhance Drought Tolerance in Cotton through Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities, Nitrogen Metabolism and Osmotic Adjustment
Plants 2020, 9(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020178 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses and hampers many plant physiological processes under suboptimal nitrogen (N) concentration. Seedling tolerance to drought stress is very important for optimum growth and development, however, the enhancement of plant stress tolerance through N application [...] Read more.
Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses and hampers many plant physiological processes under suboptimal nitrogen (N) concentration. Seedling tolerance to drought stress is very important for optimum growth and development, however, the enhancement of plant stress tolerance through N application in cotton is not fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the role of high N concentration in enhancing drought stress tolerance in cotton. A hydroponic experiment supplying low (0.25 mM) and high (5 mM) N concentrations, followed by 150 g L−1 polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced stress was conducted in a growth chamber. PEG-induced drought stress inhibited seedling growth, led to oxidative stress from excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) generation, and reduced N metabolism. High N concentrations alleviated oxidative damage and stomatal limitation by increasing antioxidant enzymatic activities, leaf relative water content, and photosynthesis in cotton seedlings under drought stress. The results revealed that the ameliorative effects of high N concentration may be ascribed to the enhancement of N metabolizing enzymes and an increase in the amounts of osmoprotectants like free amino acids and total soluble protein. The present data suggest that relatively high N concentrations may contribute to drought stress tolerance in cotton through N metabolism, antioxidant capacity, and osmotic adjustment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition and Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance)
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