Effects of Biostimulants on Plant Physiology and Metabolic Profile

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 3472

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Enviromental Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli” Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta, Italy
Interests: role of compatible osmolytes in stress responses; plant metabolic profiling; regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; effects of biostimulants on plant metabolism
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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta, Italy
Interests: the effects of different types of cultivation; the use of plant biostimulants, on the yield and metabolism of horticultural crops

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development calls for the transition towards more sustainable agricultural production models. We can no longer address the growing demand for food through intensive agriculture using high inputs of water and fertilizers. Therefore, research should be redirected towards agricultural production systems capable of achieving sustainable productivity while reducing environmental impact. Furthermore, we must not overlook the fact that there is a growing and profitable market share for premium plant products, with a high nutritional and nutraceutical profile. One promising strategy that could facilitate the transition from input-intensive agriculture to a sustainable production approach and/or improve the functional quality of plant products involves the use of plant biostimulants in cropping systems. The results present in the literature show that biostimulants can modify the endogenous/physiological processes of plants, improving their resources use efficiency, yield, and nutritional quality, particularly under abiotic stresses. We, therefore, ask for contributions to this topic issue regarding the beneficial effects of biostimulants in promoting plant endogenous mechanisms that have positive effects on crop yield, stress tolerance, and product quality, specifically underlying their mechanisms of action.

Prof. Dr. Petronia Carillo
Dr. Giovanna Marta Fusco
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1955 KiB  
Article
Diversity of Leaf Fungal Endophytes from Two Coffea arabica Varieties and Antagonism towards Coffee Leaf Rust
by Ruth A. Poma-Angamarca, Jacqueline R. Rojas, Aminael Sánchez-Rodríguez and Mario X. Ruiz-González
Plants 2024, 13(6), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13060814 - 12 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Coffee has immense value as a worldwide-appreciated commodity. However, its production faces the effects of climate change and the spread of severe diseases such as coffee leaf rust (CLR). The exploration of fungal endophytes associated with Coffea sp. has already found the existence [...] Read more.
Coffee has immense value as a worldwide-appreciated commodity. However, its production faces the effects of climate change and the spread of severe diseases such as coffee leaf rust (CLR). The exploration of fungal endophytes associated with Coffea sp. has already found the existence of nearly 600 fungal species, but their role in the plants remains practically unknown. We have researched the diversity of leaf fungal endophytes in two Coffea arabica varieties: one susceptible and one resistant to CLR. Then, we conducted cross-infection essays with four common endophyte species (three Colletotrichum sp. and Xylaria sp. 1) and Hemileia vastatrix (CLR) in leaf discs, to investigate the interaction of the endophytes on CLR colonisation success and severity of infection. Two Colletotrichum sp., when inoculated 72 h before H. vastatrix, prevented the colonisation of the leaf disc by the latter. Moreover, the presence of endophytes prior to the arrival of H. vastatrix ameliorated the severity of CLR. Our work highlights both the importance of characterising the hidden biodiversity of endophytes and investigating their potential roles in the plant-endophyte interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Biostimulants on Plant Physiology and Metabolic Profile)
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19 pages, 2968 KiB  
Article
KI Increases Tomato Fruit Quality and Water Deficit Tolerance by Improving Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Amino Acid Accumulation: A Priming Effect or Relief during Stress?
by Jucelino de Sousa Lima, Otávio Vitor Souza Andrade, Everton Geraldo de Morais, Gilson Gustavo Lucinda Machado, Leônidas Canuto dos Santos, Eduarda Santos de Andrade, Pedro Antônio Namorato Benevenute, Gabryel Silva Martins, Vitor L. Nascimento, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro Marchiori, Guilherme Lopes, Eduardo Valério de Barros Vilas Boas and Luiz Roberto Guimarães Guilherme
Plants 2023, 12(23), 4023; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12234023 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1070
Abstract
A water deficit can negatively impact fruit yield and quality, affecting critical physiological processes. Strategies to mitigate water deficits are crucial to global food security. Iodine (I) may increase the efficiency of the antioxidant system of plants, but its role against water deficits [...] Read more.
A water deficit can negatively impact fruit yield and quality, affecting critical physiological processes. Strategies to mitigate water deficits are crucial to global food security. Iodine (I) may increase the efficiency of the antioxidant system of plants, but its role against water deficits is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of I in attenuating water deficits and improving fruit quality, investigating whether metabolic responses are derived from a “priming effect” or stress relief during water deficits. Tomato plants were exposed to different concentrations of potassium iodide (KI) via a nutrient solution and subjected to a water deficit. A water deficit in tomatoes without KI reduced their yield by 98%. However, a concentration of 100 μM of KI increased the yield under a water deficit by 28%. This condition is correlated with increased antioxidant activity, photosynthetic efficiency improvement, and malondialdehyde reduction. In addition, the concentration of 100 μM of KI promoted better fruit quality through antioxidant capacity and a decline in the maturation index. Therefore, KI can be an alternative for attenuating water deficits in tomatoes, inducing positive responses during the water deficit period while at the same time improving fruit quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Biostimulants on Plant Physiology and Metabolic Profile)
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22 pages, 13627 KiB  
Article
Exogenous Salicylic Acid Alleviates NO2 Damage by Maintaining Cell Stability and Physiological Metabolism in Bougainvillea × buttiana ‘Miss Manila’ Seedlings
by Yuxiang Liang, Dalu Li, Qianqian Sheng and Zunling Zhu
Plants 2023, 12(18), 3283; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12183283 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 841
Abstract
Exogenous substances can alleviate plant damage under adverse conditions. In order to explore whether different concentrations of salicylic acid (SA) can play a role in the resistance of Bougainvillea × buttiana ‘Miss Manila’ to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) stress and the relevant [...] Read more.
Exogenous substances can alleviate plant damage under adverse conditions. In order to explore whether different concentrations of salicylic acid (SA) can play a role in the resistance of Bougainvillea × buttiana ‘Miss Manila’ to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) stress and the relevant mechanisms of their effects, different concentrations of SA were applied locally under the control experiment condition of 4.0 μL·L−1 NO2, and the role of SA in alleviating injury was studied. The findings noted a significant increase in metabolic adaptations and antioxidant enzyme activities following 0.25–0.75 mM SA application (p < 0.05), except 1 mM. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in particular increased by 21.88% and 59.71%, respectively. Such an increase led to effective control of the reduction in photosynthetic pigments and the photosynthetic rate and protection of the structural stability of chloroplasts and other organelles. In addition, the activity of nitrate reductase (NR) increased by 83.85%, and the content of nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) decreased by 29.23% in nitrogen metabolism. Concurrently, a principal component analysis (PCA) and a membership function analysis further indicated that 0.75 mM SA provided the most notable improvement in NO2 resistance among the different gradients. These findings suggest that 0.25–0.75 mM SA can relieve the stress at 4 μL·L−1 NO2 injury by effectively improving the antioxidant enzyme activity and nitrogen metabolizing enzyme activity, protecting the photosynthetic system and cell structure, but 1 mM SA had the opposite effect. In the future, the specific reasons for inhibition of SA at high concentrations and the comprehensive effects of the application of other exogenous compounds should be further studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Biostimulants on Plant Physiology and Metabolic Profile)
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