Plant Responses and Tolerance to Metal/Metalloid Toxicity III

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2156

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh
Interests: antioxidants; abiotic stress tolerance; plant metabolites; ROS signaling
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Guest Editor
Department of Botany and Plant Physiology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
Interests: metal toxicity; metallophytes; extremophytes; phytoremediation; oxidative stress; stress tolerance
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Special Issue Information

Dear Coleagues,

In the industrial era, the most important and potential threats to crop production are abiotic stresses. Among them, toxic metal stress is one of the major concerns. The growing population and fast industrialization coincide, resulting in the generation and dissemination of huge amounts of toxic metals in the environment. Toxic metals and metalloids result in growth reduction, altered physiology, and metabolisms, and diminish cellular integrity. Toxic metals also alter the redox homeostasis by influencing the reactive oxygen species generation. They also interfere with the nutrient and water uptake. As a result, both the crop yield and quality are hampered. Considering these effects, plant biologists, breeders, and agronomists are working to find approaches to enhancing plants’ tolerance to metal/metalloid toxicity. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the metal chelation, antioxidant defense, and phytoremediation. A number of biotechnological tools and molecular approaches also contribute to such developments. In this Special Issue, we will publish reviews, mini-reviews, and research articles focusing on plant responses and their tolerance to metal/metalloid stress.

Prof. Dr. Mirza Hasanuzzaman
Prof. Dr. Alina Wiszniewska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • arsenic
  • cadmium
  • ecotoxicology
  • environmental pollutants
  • heavy metals
  • metal chelation
  • metalloids
  • phytoremediation
  • trace elements

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 3108 KiB  
Article
Glycine-Rich RNA-Binding Protein AtGRP7 Functions in Nickel and Lead Tolerance in Arabidopsis
by Yeon-Ok Kim, Mahpara Safdar, Hunseung Kang and Jangho Kim
Plants 2024, 13(2), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020187 - 10 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Plant glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) play crucial roles in the response to environmental stresses. However, the functions of AtGRP7 in plants under heavy metal stress remain unclear. In the present study, in Arabidopsis, the transcript level of AtGRP7 was markedly increased by [...] Read more.
Plant glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) play crucial roles in the response to environmental stresses. However, the functions of AtGRP7 in plants under heavy metal stress remain unclear. In the present study, in Arabidopsis, the transcript level of AtGRP7 was markedly increased by Ni but was decreased by Pb. AtGRP7-overexpressing plants improved Ni tolerance, whereas the knockout mutant (grp7) was more susceptible than the wild type to Ni. In addition, grp7 showed greatly enhanced Pb tolerance, whereas overexpression lines showed high Pb sensitivity. Ni accumulation was reduced in overexpression lines but increased in grp7, whereas Pb accumulation in grp7 was lower than that in overexpression lines. Ni induced glutathione synthase genes GS1 and GS2 in overexpression lines, whereas Pb increased metallothionein genes MT4a and MT4b and phytochelatin synthase genes PCS1 and PCS2 in grp7. Furthermore, Ni increased CuSOD1 and GR1 in grp7, whereas Pb significantly induced FeSOD1 and FeSOD2 in overexpression lines. The mRNA stability of GS2 and PCS1 was directly regulated by AtGRP7 under Ni and Pb, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that AtGRP7 plays a crucial role in Ni and Pb tolerance by reducing Ni and Pb accumulation and the direct or indirect post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to heavy metal chelators and antioxidant enzymes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Responses and Tolerance to Metal/Metalloid Toxicity III)
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Review

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26 pages, 3897 KiB  
Review
Exploring Aluminum Tolerance Mechanisms in Plants with Reference to Rice and Arabidopsis: A Comprehensive Review of Genetic, Metabolic, and Physiological Adaptations in Acidic Soils
by Nilakshi Chakraborty, Abir Das, Sayan Pal, Soumita Roy, Sudipta Kumar Sil, Malay Kumar Adak and Mirza Hassanzamman
Plants 2024, 13(13), 1760; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13131760 - 25 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Aluminum (Al) makes up a third of the Earth’s crust and is a widespread toxic contaminant, particularly in acidic soils. It impacts crops at multiple levels, from cellular to whole plant systems. This review delves into Al’s reactivity, including its cellular transport, involvement [...] Read more.
Aluminum (Al) makes up a third of the Earth’s crust and is a widespread toxic contaminant, particularly in acidic soils. It impacts crops at multiple levels, from cellular to whole plant systems. This review delves into Al’s reactivity, including its cellular transport, involvement in oxidative redox reactions, and development of specific metabolites, as well as the influence of genes on the production of membrane channels and transporters, alongside its role in triggering senescence. It discusses the involvement of channel proteins in calcium influx, vacuolar proton pumping, the suppression of mitochondrial respiration, and the initiation of programmed cell death. At the cellular nucleus level, the effects of Al on gene regulation through alterations in nucleic acid modifications, such as methylation and histone acetylation, are examined. In addition, this review outlines the pathways of Al-induced metabolic disruption, specifically citric acid metabolism, the regulation of proton excretion, the induction of specific transcription factors, the modulation of Al-responsive proteins, changes in citrate and nucleotide glucose transporters, and overall metal detoxification pathways in tolerant genotypes. It also considers the expression of phenolic oxidases in response to oxidative stress, their regulatory feedback on mitochondrial cytochrome proteins, and their consequences on root development. Ultimately, this review focuses on the selective metabolic pathways that facilitate Al exclusion and tolerance, emphasizing compartmentalization, antioxidative defense mechanisms, and the control of programmed cell death to manage metal toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Responses and Tolerance to Metal/Metalloid Toxicity III)
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