Special Issue "X-ray Luminescence and Fluorescence"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Changqing Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of California, Merced, Merced, CA 95343, USA
Interests: biomedical optics; fluorescence molecular tomography; x-ray luminescence optical tomography; Cerenkov luminescence imaging/tomography; x-ray computerized tomography; positron emission tomography; multimodality imaging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ge Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Imaging Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180, USA
Interests: biomedical imaging; artificial intelligence; deep learning
Prof. Dr. Jeffrey N. Anker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Bioengineering Department, Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering (COMSET) and Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
Interests: sensors; biosensors; medical imaging; nanoparticles; spectroscopy; microscopy; implanted medical devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The past decade has witnessed the emergence of new X-ray molecular imaging modalities that uniquely combine the fine spatial resolution of X-ray imaging and tomography with the molecular sensitivity and specificity provided by X-ray excited optical luminescence and X-ray fluorescence. Among these techniques, X-ray luminescence imaging (XLI), X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT), and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) have attracted great attention for their wide-ranging applications in imaging cancer, detecting infection, studying cellular microenvironments, monitoring response to therapy, etc.

This Special Issue will focus on state-of-the-art research in X-ray molecular imaging including XLI, XLCT, XFCT, or RLI, covering system improvements, imaging probes, reconstruction algorithms, and applications. Both original research papers and reviews are welcome.

The manuscripts should focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • XLI/XLCT instrumentation;
  • XFCT instrumentation;
  • Radioluminescence imaging (RLI);
  • Any approach to improving the performance of XLI/XLCT or XFCT or RLI;
  • Algorithms for XLI/XFCT or XFCT or RLI image reconstruction;
  • Probes for XLI/XLCT or XFCT or RLI imaging;
  • Applications of XLI/XLCT, XFCT, or RLI.

Dr. Changqing Li
Prof. Dr. Ge Wang
Prof. Dr. Jeffrey N. Anker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Research on X-ray Fluorescence Enhanced Fluoroscopy Imaging Technology
Photonics 2021, 8(10), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8100441 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 270
Abstract
Chest X-ray fluoroscopy is a commonly used medical imaging method, which has a wide range of applications in the diagnosis of lung diseases and other fields. However, due to low contrast and relatively close linear attenuation coefficients, some early small lesions are difficult [...] Read more.
Chest X-ray fluoroscopy is a commonly used medical imaging method, which has a wide range of applications in the diagnosis of lung diseases and other fields. However, due to low contrast and relatively close linear attenuation coefficients, some early small lesions are difficult to detect in time. Using the X-ray fluorescent effect of high atomic number metal elements and metal atom-containing agents that can be enriched in the lesion, the fluoroscopy signal and the fluorescent signal emitted by the metal atoms can be detected at the same time during the fluoroscopy, and the images of the two can be integrated, which can theoretically enhance the contrast between the lesion and the surrounding tissue. Based on GEANT4, this paper conducts Monte Carlo simulations to explore the feasibility and enhancement effects of three enhancement schemes: the pencil beam spot scanning method, cone-beam collimation method, and slit scanning method, and discusses the specific geometric structure and material selection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue X-ray Luminescence and Fluorescence)
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Article
X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography (XFCT) Imaging with a Superfine Pencil Beam X-ray Source
Photonics 2021, 8(7), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8070236 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 459
Abstract
X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a molecular imaging technique that can be used to sense different elements or nanoparticle (NP) agents inside deep samples or tissues. However, XFCT has not been a popular molecular imaging tool because it has limited molecular sensitivity [...] Read more.
X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a molecular imaging technique that can be used to sense different elements or nanoparticle (NP) agents inside deep samples or tissues. However, XFCT has not been a popular molecular imaging tool because it has limited molecular sensitivity and spatial resolution. We present a benchtop XFCT imaging system in which a superfine pencil-beam X-ray source and a ring of X-ray spectrometers were simulated using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) Monte Carlo software. An accelerated majorization minimization (MM) algorithm with an L1 regularization scheme was used to reconstruct the XFCT image of molybdenum (Mo) NP targets. Good target localization was achieved with a DICE coefficient of 88.737%. The reconstructed signal of the targets was found to be proportional to the target concentrations if detector number, detector placement, and angular projection number are optimized. The MM algorithm performance was compared with the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) and filtered back projection (FBP) algorithms. Our results indicate that the MM algorithm is superior to the ML-EM and FBP algorithms. We found that the MM algorithm was able to reconstruct XFCT targets as small as 0.25 mm in diameter. We also found that measurements with three angular projections and a 20-detector ring are enough to reconstruct the XFCT images. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue X-ray Luminescence and Fluorescence)
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