Special Issue "Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jens Biegert Website E-Mail
Attoscience and Ultrafast Optics, ICFO - The Institute of Photonic Sciences, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona), Spain
Interests: ultrafast science; few-cycle and CEP stable pulses; parametric interactions; OPCPA; strong field and attosecond science; XUV generation; metrology; electron ion coincidence measurements; COLTRIMS; laser guidestars; filamentation
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter Günter Website E-Mail
Nonlinear Optics Laboratory, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: nonlinear optical and electro-optical effects in molecular crystals and polymers; photorefractive effects; integrated electro-optics and nonlinear optics; self assembly of molecules by molecular beam deposition; charge transport in organic and inorganic solids; photonics and optical processing; THz photonics

Special Issue Information

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Nonlinear Diffuse fs-Pulse Reflectometry of Harmonic Upconversion Nanoparticles
Photonics 2017, 4(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics4010011 - 19 Feb 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Nonlinear diffuse femtosecond-pulse reflectometry is introduced as a powerful experimental tool for the unambiguous characterization of polar and non-polar point symmetry groups of harmonic upconversion nanoparticles. Using intense ultrashort 40 femtosecond laser pulses and an appropriate figure of merit (FOM), second and third [...] Read more.
Nonlinear diffuse femtosecond-pulse reflectometry is introduced as a powerful experimental tool for the unambiguous characterization of polar and non-polar point symmetry groups of harmonic upconversion nanoparticles. Using intense ultrashort 40 femtosecond laser pulses and an appropriate figure of merit (FOM), second and third harmonic emission serve for the structural characterization of polar Yb-doped lithium niobate and non-polar titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The tool is capable of differentiating these two samples by FOM values that differ by up to 13 orders of magnitude. The general applicability to harmonic upconversion nanoparticles over a broad range of intensities and wavelength spectrum, is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences)
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Open AccessArticle
Phase-Insensitive Scattering of Terahertz Radiation
Photonics 2017, 4(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics4010007 - 31 Jan 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The nonlinear interaction between Near-Infrared (NIR) and Terahertz pulses is principally investigated as a means for the detection of radiation in the hardly accessible THz spectral region. Most studies have targeted second-order nonlinear processes, given their higher efficiencies, and only a limited number [...] Read more.
The nonlinear interaction between Near-Infrared (NIR) and Terahertz pulses is principally investigated as a means for the detection of radiation in the hardly accessible THz spectral region. Most studies have targeted second-order nonlinear processes, given their higher efficiencies, and only a limited number have addressed third-order nonlinear interactions, mainly investigating four-wave mixing in air for broadband THz detection. We have studied the nonlinear interaction between THz and NIR pulses in solid-state media (specifically diamond), and we show how the former can be frequency-shifted up to UV frequencies by the scattering from the nonlinear polarisation induced by the latter. Such UV emission differs from the well-known electric field-induced second harmonic (EFISH) one, as it is generated via a phase-insensitive scattering, rather than a sum- or difference-frequency four-wave-mixing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of Sub 10 fs Visible-NIR, UV, and DUV Pulses and Their Applications to Ultrafast Spectroscopy
Photonics 2016, 3(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics3040064 - 17 Dec 2016
Cited by 3
Abstract
In the first section of this Chapter, the basics of nonlinear optical (NLO) processes are systematically described. Then the generation of the visible pulse utilizing the NLO processes is described and ultrafast spectroscopy using the visible pulse is discussed. By using such short [...] Read more.
In the first section of this Chapter, the basics of nonlinear optical (NLO) processes are systematically described. Then the generation of the visible pulse utilizing the NLO processes is described and ultrafast spectroscopy using the visible pulse is discussed. By using such short pulse, fast chemical reactions, which cannot be identified by utilizing strobe light or flash lamp, can be studied. After the development of femtosecond lasers, they have been widely applied to observe the transition state of various chemical reactions. In the near infrared (NIR) region, a commercial light source of Ti:sapphire laser is available as a femtosecond light source, but not available in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions. In this article, we report our development of sub 10 fs visible-NIR, UV, and deep-ultraviolet (DUV) pulses and their applications to ultrafast spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences)
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Open AccessArticle
Multi-Scale Simulation for Transient Absorption Spectroscopy under Intense Few-Cycle Pulse Laser
Photonics 2016, 3(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics3040063 - 07 Dec 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
Numerical pump-probe simulations for the sub-cycle transient spectroscopy of thin film diamond under intense few cycle pulse laser field is reported. The electron dynamics is calculated by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation. Simultaneously, the propagation of electromagnetic field is calculated by the Maxwell equation. [...] Read more.
Numerical pump-probe simulations for the sub-cycle transient spectroscopy of thin film diamond under intense few cycle pulse laser field is reported. The electron dynamics is calculated by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation. Simultaneously, the propagation of electromagnetic field is calculated by the Maxwell equation. Our result shows that the modulation of the reflectivity, transmission, and absorption around the optical gap do not coincide with the field amplitude of the pump laser. The phase shift of the modulation with respect to the pump field depends on the pump intensity and probe frequency. The modulation of the reflectivity is sensitive to the choice of the exchange-correlation potential, and dynamical effect of the mean-field in meta-GGA potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ultrafast Laser Pulses for Structuring Materials at Micro/Nano Scale: From Waveguides to Superhydrophobic Surfaces
Photonics 2017, 4(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics4010008 - 31 Jan 2017
Cited by 15
Abstract
The current demand for fabricating optical and photonic devices displaying high performance, using low-cost and time-saving methods, prompts femtosecond (fs)-laser processing as a promising methodology. High and low repetition femtosecond lasers enable surface and/or bulk modification of distinct materials, which can be used [...] Read more.
The current demand for fabricating optical and photonic devices displaying high performance, using low-cost and time-saving methods, prompts femtosecond (fs)-laser processing as a promising methodology. High and low repetition femtosecond lasers enable surface and/or bulk modification of distinct materials, which can be used for applications ranging from optical waveguides to superhydrophobic surfaces. Herein, some fundamental aspects of fs-laser processing of materials, as well as the basics of their most common experimental apparatuses, are introduced. A survey of results on polymer fs-laser processing, resulting in 3D waveguides, electroluminescent structures and active hybrid-microstructures for luminescence or biological microenvironments is presented. Similarly, results of fs-laser processing on glasses, gold and silicon to produce waveguides containing metallic nanoparticles, analytical chemical sensors and surface with modified features, respectively, are also described. The complexity of fs-laser micromachining involves precise control of material properties, pushing ultrafast laser processing as an advanced technique for micro/nano devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Photonics and Attosecond Sciences)
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