Optical Light Propagation and Communication Through Turbulent Medium

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Communication and Network".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2025 | Viewed by 316

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT), University of Luxembourg, 29 Avenue J.F Kennedy, L-1855 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Interests: optical wireless communication; light propagation; scintillation; beam shaping; turbulence

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Guest Editor
Engineering Faculty, Electric Electronic Engineering Department, Sivas University of Science and Technology, Gültepe Mahallesi Mecnun Otyakmaz Caddesi No 1 Merkez, Sivas 58000, Türkiye
Interests: laser propagation; turbulent media; optical wireless communication; beam shaping; 3D printing for optics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical communication through turbulent media presents significant challenges and opportunities for researchers in optics and photonics. This Special Issue explores the latest advancements, research findings, and innovative solutions in this field. We welcome submissions presenting numerical and experimental results from turbulent media such as atmosphere, water, marine waters, jet engine exhaust, and tissue; adaptive optics techniques for mitigating turbulence effects in optical communication, free-space and underwater optical communication systems in turbulent environments, and the associated challenges; novel approaches for improving the performance of optical communication through turbulence; and the applications of optical communication in 6G backhaul, satellite, defense, aerospace, and underwater exploration. The constantly growing body of research on optical light propagation and communication through turbulent media demonstrates the many opportunities for increasing its technological applications.

We invite you to submit recent results on optical light propagation and communication through turbulent media to this Special Issue.

We welcome submissions on topics that include (but are not limited to) the following emerging trends:

  • Propagation of beams in turbulent media such as atmosphere, slant paths, underwater, biological tissue, jet engine exhaust, and marine waters;
  • Evolution of nontraditional beams through propagation;
  • Analysis of beams with orbital angular momentum;
  • Scintillation and performance analysis of communication systems in these environments.

Dr. Mert Bayraktar
Dr. Kholoud Elmabruk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • optical communication
  • turbulent medium
  • atmospheric turbulence
  • free-space optical communication
  • adaptive optics
  • underwater optical communication
  • tissue turbulence, jet engine turbulence, wavefront sensing and control
  • scintillation
  • beam wandering
  • laser communication
  • photonics
  • light propagation
  • adaptive optics systems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2673 KiB  
Article
A Study on the Irradiance Scintillation Characteristics of Monochromatic LED-Based Visible Light Communication Systems in Weak-to-Strong Turbulence
by Yao Ji, Wensheng Chen, Danning Wang and Chen Cheng
Photonics 2024, 11(6), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics11060567 - 17 Jun 2024
Viewed by 212
Abstract
Atmospheric turbulence causes transmitted light to fade randomly, which results in irradiance scintillation fluctuations in the received signal and significantly affects the quality of wireless optical communication systems. In this paper, we investigate the propagation characteristics of a monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED) light [...] Read more.
Atmospheric turbulence causes transmitted light to fade randomly, which results in irradiance scintillation fluctuations in the received signal and significantly affects the quality of wireless optical communication systems. In this paper, we investigate the propagation characteristics of a monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED) light beam through weak-to-strong turbulence. Considering the spatial incoherence of a monochromatic LED light source, the emitted light field of a monochromatic LED light source is represented by a random field multiplied by a deterministic field that follows a Gaussian distribution. Then, based on the extended-Rytov theory, a closed expression for the irradiance scintillation index under weak-to-strong turbulence is derived. In addition, the expression for the fading probability governed by the Gamma–Gamma model is given. Finally, the effects of near-earth atmospheric refractive index structural parameters, signal propagation distances, and working light wavelengths on propagation characteristics of the LED-based VLC system are simulated and compared with those of the laser-based one. The results theoretically confirm that laser light sources are more susceptible to atmospheric turbulence along the propagation path than monochromatic LED light sources. The investigation in this paper can provide theoretical support for the design of visible light communication systems in practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Light Propagation and Communication Through Turbulent Medium)
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