Special Issue "Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gisselle Gallego

Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Sydney, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney, Australia
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Interests: health care education; health services research; health policy and knowledge translation
Associate Professor, PhD. (pharm.) Lotte Stig Nørgaard (former Haugbølle)
Website
Guest Editor
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, PharmaSchool, Department of Pharmacy, Section for Social and Clinical Pharmacy, Copenhagen, Denmark

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are looking for papers using qualitative methods in pharmacy and health services research. This could include, but is not limited to, pharmacy education, practice or clinical pharmacy. The compilation will be a useful reference material for students and researchers engaged in pharmacy and health service research. Meta-ethnography, original research articles and interdisciplinary research will be welcomed. The deadline for submissions for this Special Issue of the journal is 30 November 2017. All articles with subject heading Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research Special Issue should be should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). Submitted articles will be given accelerated reviews, and a decision will be forwarded to the author(s) approximately within four weeks of submission.

A copy of the instruction to authors of the journal can be obtained from the journal website: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/pharmacy/instructions as guidance to prospective authors.

Dr. Gisselle Gallego
Assoc. Prof. Lotte Stig Nørgaard
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Qualitative methods
  • interviews
  • focus groups
  • research approaches using qualitative research
  • data quality criteria in qualitative research
  • multi methods
  • mixed methods
  • pharmacy and health services research

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research
Pharmacy 2018, 6(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6030079 - 02 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Over the past years, there has been an increase in the use of qualitative methods in health services research, including pharmacy research. Pharmacy practice researchers can use these methods to understand, explain, discover, and explore both patients’ and health care practitioners’ thoughts, perceptions, [...] Read more.
Over the past years, there has been an increase in the use of qualitative methods in health services research, including pharmacy research. Pharmacy practice researchers can use these methods to understand, explain, discover, and explore both patients’ and health care practitioners’ thoughts, perceptions, and feelings. Qualitative research can also be used for the “democratisation” of research methods through research that is inclusive, collaborative, and involves partnerships and co-production. There is a wide spectrum of qualitative research methods that might be used in pharmacy research. This Special Issue showcases five articles in different settings and countries with diverse participants that seek to develop, explore, describe, and identify. These articles provide further insights into important pharmacy questions with the ultimate goal of helping improve health and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Women’s Beliefs on Early Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer: A Theory-Based Qualitative Study to Guide the Development of Community Pharmacist Interventions
Pharmacy 2018, 6(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6020053 - 09 Jun 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) taken for a minimum of five years reduces the recurrence and mortality risks among women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. However, adherence to AET is suboptimal. To guide the development of theory-based interventions to enhance AET adherence, we conducted a [...] Read more.
Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) taken for a minimum of five years reduces the recurrence and mortality risks among women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. However, adherence to AET is suboptimal. To guide the development of theory-based interventions to enhance AET adherence, we conducted a study to explore beliefs regarding early adherence to AET. This qualitative study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). We conducted focus groups and individual interviews among women prescribed AET in the last two years (n = 43). The topic guide explored attitudinal (perceived advantages and disadvantages), normative (perception of approval or disapproval), and control beliefs (barriers and facilitating factors) towards adhering to AET. Thematic analysis was conducted. Most women had a positive attitude towards AET regardless of their medication-taking behavior. The principal perceived advantage was protection against a recurrence while the principal inconvenience was side effects. Almost everyone approved of the woman taking her medication. The women mentioned facilitating factors to encourage medication-taking behaviors and cope with side effects. For adherent women, having trouble establishing a routine was their main barrier to taking medication. For non-adherent women, it was side effects affecting their quality of life. These findings could inform the development of community pharmacy-based adherence interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Barriers and Facilitators of Partner Treatment of Chlamydia: A Qualitative Investigation with Prescribers and Community Pharmacists
Pharmacy 2018, 6(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010017 - 08 Feb 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Chlamydia trachomatis is the most frequently-notified sexually transmitted infection in Australia. Effective and timely partner treatment of chlamydia is essential to reduce overall prevalence and the burden of infection. Currently in most of Australia, the only avenue for partner treatment of chlamydia (“standard [...] Read more.
Chlamydia trachomatis is the most frequently-notified sexually transmitted infection in Australia. Effective and timely partner treatment of chlamydia is essential to reduce overall prevalence and the burden of infection. Currently in most of Australia, the only avenue for partner treatment of chlamydia (“standard partner therapy”) is a tedious, and often inconvenient, process. The barriers and facilitators of standard partner therapy, and newer models of accelerated partner therapy (APT), need to be identified in the Australian setting. Additionally, the potential role of community pharmacists need to be explored. Semi-structured interview guides for two key stakeholder groups (prescribers and pharmacists) were developed and piloted. Eleven prescribers (general practitioners, sexual health clinicians and nurse practitioners) and twelve pharmacists practicing in the Perth metropolitan region were interviewed. Key reported barriers to standard partner therapy were lack of or delayed chlamydia testing. Key facilitators included ability to test and educate sexual partner. Key barriers for APT included prescribers’ legal responsibility and potential for medication-related adverse effects. Healthcare provider consultation and chlamydia testing were seen as potential facilitators of APT. Pharmacists were receptive to the idea of expanding their role in chlamydia treatment, however, barriers to privacy must be overcome in order to be acceptable to prescribers and pharmacists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)
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Open AccessArticle
Giving Voice to the Medically Under-Served: A Qualitative Co-Production Approach to Explore Patient Medicine Experiences and Improve Services to Marginalized Communities
Pharmacy 2018, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010013 - 27 Jan 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
Background: With an aging population, the appropriate, effective and safe use of medicines is a global health priority. However, “‘medically under-served” patients continue to experience significant inequalities around access to healthcare services. Aim: This study forms part of a wider project [...] Read more.
Background: With an aging population, the appropriate, effective and safe use of medicines is a global health priority. However, “‘medically under-served” patients continue to experience significant inequalities around access to healthcare services. Aim: This study forms part of a wider project to co-develop and evaluate a digital educational intervention for community pharmacy. The aim of this paper is to explore the medicine needs of patients from marginalized communities and suggest practical way on how services could be better tailored to their requirements. Method: Following ethical approval, qualitative data was gathered from: (1) workshops with patients and professionals (n = 57 attendees); and (2) qualitative semi-structured interviews (10 patients and 10 pharmacists). Results: Our findings revealed that patients from marginalized communities reported poor management of their medical conditions and significant problems with adherence to prescribed medicines. Their experience of pharmacy services was found to be variable with many experiencing discrimination or disadvantage as a result of their status. Discussion: This study highlights the plight of medically under-served communities and the need for policy makers to tailor services to an individual’s needs and circumstances. Furthermore, patients and professionals can work in collaboration using a co-production approach to develop educational interventions for pharmacy service improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)
Open AccessArticle
Thinking in Pharmacy Practice: A Study of Community Pharmacists’ Clinical Reasoning in Medication Supply Using the Think-Aloud Method
Pharmacy 2018, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6010001 - 31 Dec 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Medication review and supply by pharmacists involves both cognitive and technical skills related to the safety and appropriateness of prescribed medicines. The cognitive ability of pharmacists to recall, synthesise and memorise information is a critical aspect of safe and optimal medicines use, yet [...] Read more.
Medication review and supply by pharmacists involves both cognitive and technical skills related to the safety and appropriateness of prescribed medicines. The cognitive ability of pharmacists to recall, synthesise and memorise information is a critical aspect of safe and optimal medicines use, yet few studies have investigated the clinical reasoning and decision-making processes pharmacists use when supplying prescribed medicines. The objective of this study was to examine the patterns and processes of pharmacists’ clinical reasoning and to identify the information sources used, when making decisions about the safety and appropriateness of prescribed medicines. Ten community pharmacists participated in a simulation in which they were required to review a prescription and make decisions about the safety and appropriateness of supplying the prescribed medicines to the patient, whilst at the same time thinking aloud about the tasks required. Following the simulation each pharmacist was asked a series of questions to prompt retrospective thinking aloud using video-stimulated recall. The simulated consultation and retrospective interview were recorded and transcribed for thematic analysis. All of the pharmacists made a safe and appropriate supply of two prescribed medicines to the simulated patient. Qualitative analysis identified seven core thinking processes used during the supply process: considering prescription in context, retrieving information, identifying medication-related issues, processing information, collaborative planning, decision making and reflection; and align closely with other health professionals. The insights from this study have implications for enhancing awareness of decision making processes in pharmacy practice and informing teaching and assessment approaches in medication supply. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)

Other

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Open AccessProtocol
The Development of a Community Pharmacy-Based Intervention to Optimize Patients’ Use of and Experience with Antidepressants: A Step-by-Step Demonstration of the Intervention Mapping Process
Pharmacy 2018, 6(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6020039 - 02 May 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Objective: To describe the development of a community pharmacy-based intervention aimed at optimizing experience and use of antidepressants (ADs) for patients with mood and anxiety disorders. Methods: Intervention Mapping (IM) was used for conducting needs assessment, formulating intervention objectives, selecting change methods and [...] Read more.
Objective: To describe the development of a community pharmacy-based intervention aimed at optimizing experience and use of antidepressants (ADs) for patients with mood and anxiety disorders. Methods: Intervention Mapping (IM) was used for conducting needs assessment, formulating intervention objectives, selecting change methods and practical applications, designing the intervention, and planning intervention implementation. IM is based on a qualitative participatory approach and each step of the intervention development process was conducted through consultations with a pharmacists’ committee. Results: A needs assessment was informed by qualitative and quantitative studies conducted with leaders, pharmacists, and patients. Intervention objectives and change methods were selected to target factors influencing patients’ experience with and use of ADs. The intervention includes four brief consultations between the pharmacist and the patient: (1) provision of information (first AD claim); (2) management of side effects (15 days after first claim); (3) monitoring treatment efficacy (30-day renewal); (4) assessment of treatment persistence (2-month renewal, repeated every 6 months). A detailed implementation plan was also developed. Conclusion: IM provided a systematic and rigorous approach to the development of an intervention directly tied to empirical data on patients’ and pharmacists’ experiences and recommendations. The thorough description of this intervention may facilitate the development of new pharmacy-based interventions or the adaptation of this intervention to other illnesses and settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research)
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