Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research series Ⅱ

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 8065

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, PO Box 944 Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
Interests: vulnerable populations; disability; cultural and linguistic diverse and mixed methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, Department of Pharmacy, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: patient perspectives on medicine use; pharmacy internship; pharmacy counselling; qualitative research; sector transition issues; ethnic minorities; study drug use; personalized medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A couple of years ago, we were Guest Editors for a Special Issue in Pharmacy on qualitative methods in pharmacy practice research. The papers published in that Issue covered different and interesting aspects of the use of qualitative methods. We concluded that over the past years there has been an increase in the use of qualitative methods in health services research, including pharmacy research. This is even more true today, three years later. Pharmacy practice researchers are to a wide extent using qualitative methods to understand, explain, discover, and explore both patients’ and health care practitioners’ thoughts, perceptions, feelings, and actions. Qualitative research is also increasingly used for the “democratization” of research through research that is inclusive, collaborative, and involves partnerships and co-production.

This Special Issue is an extension of the first Special Issue. We hope to receive as many interesting contributions as we did the first time. We invite you to share your approaches, successes (and failures) in/by using qualitative research in pharmacy practice and health services research. This could include, but is not limited to, pharmacy education, practice, or clinical pharmacy, as well as interprofessional education, implementation, or evaluation. The compilation will be a useful reference material for students and researchers engaged in pharmacy and health service research. Systematic reviews, original research articles, and interdisciplinary research will be welcomed. The deadline for submissions for this Special Issue of the journal is 31 March 2021. All articles submitted with the subject heading Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research Special Issue should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers).

 Dr. Lotte Stig Nørgaard
Dr. Gisselle Gallego
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Qualitative methods
  • Interviews
  • Focus groups
  • Research approaches using qualitative research
  • Data quality criteria in qualitative research
  • Multiple methods
  • Mixed methods
  • Pharmacy and health services research

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Patterns and Predictors of Off-Label Drug Prescribing in Psychiatric Practice: A Qualitative Study
by Sadia Shakeel, Shagufta Nesar, Hina Rehman, Khizra Jamil, Imran Ahsan Mallick, Muhammad Shahid Mustafa, Mudassir Anwar and Shazia Jamshed
Pharmacy 2021, 9(4), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9040203 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2977
Abstract
Off-label drug prescribing (OLDP) must be based on strong scientific evidence to make sure that patients get the optimum therapeutic outcomes. Adherence to the prerequisites is determined by the physicians’ attitude and knowledge. In this context, the present study was conducted with the [...] Read more.
Off-label drug prescribing (OLDP) must be based on strong scientific evidence to make sure that patients get the optimum therapeutic outcomes. Adherence to the prerequisites is determined by the physicians’ attitude and knowledge. In this context, the present study was conducted with the goal of investigating psychiatrists’ perceptions of the use of OLDP in their clinical practice. A total of 14 psychiatrists were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Thematic content analysis was performed. Data saturation was achieved at the 12th interview. Six major themes and fifteen subthemes emerged from qualitative interviews. Among the major themes were knowledge and concepts about the off-label drugs, attitude and current practice of prescribing off-label drugs, and rationale of prescribing and suggestions for reducing the use of off-label drugs. Almost all of the respondents interviewed provided detailed comments concerning the OLDP concept, depicted an optimistic approach and deemed that OLDP is quite common in psychiatry. Off-label usage of benzodiazepines such as clonazepam, diazepam and lorazepam in mania, depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder were commonly reported. It was observed that the majority of the respondents did not inform the patients before prescribing off-label drugs. The present findings revealed that respondents had awareness; however, they depicted diverse attitudes towards prescribing off-label drugs. Further education and sensitization in regions with impoverished knowledge would certainly assist in preventing the risks associated with the use of OLDP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research series Ⅱ)
9 pages, 588 KiB  
Article
Transitioning Focus Group Research to a Videoconferencing Environment: A Descriptive Analysis of Interactivity
by Cristine B. Henage, Stefanie P. Ferreri, Courtney Schlusser, Tamera D. Hughes, Lori T. Armistead, Casey J. Kelley, Joshua D. Niznik, Jan Busby-Whitehead and Ellen Roberts
Pharmacy 2021, 9(3), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030117 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3793
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted face-to-face interactions in healthcare research, with many studies shifting to video-based data collection for qualitative research. This study describes the interactivity achieved in a videoconferencing focus group of seven primary care providers discussing deprescribing opioids and benzodiazepines. Researchers reviewed [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted face-to-face interactions in healthcare research, with many studies shifting to video-based data collection for qualitative research. This study describes the interactivity achieved in a videoconferencing focus group of seven primary care providers discussing deprescribing opioids and benzodiazepines. Researchers reviewed video footage of a focus group conducted via Zoom and assessed interactivity using Morgan’s framework for focus group communication processes. Two reviewers categorized the type of exchanges as sharing information, comparing experiences, organizing, and conceptualizing the content, as well as validating each other or galvanizing the discussion with “lightning strike” ideas. The conversation dynamics in this focus group included clear examples of interactivity in each of the categories proposed by Morgan (validating, sharing, comparing, organizing, conceptualizing, and lightning strikes) that were observed by two different reviewers with demonstrated high interrater reliability. Conducting focus groups with a skilled moderator using videoconferencing platforms with primary care providers is a viable option that produces sufficient levels of interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative Methods in Pharmacy Research series Ⅱ)
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