Special Issue "Patient Adherence"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Judy Mullan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Health Research Illawarra Shoalhaven Population (CHRISP) and School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia
Interests: medication management; chronic disease management; health literacy; patient–doctor communications and health services research
Prof. Dr. Gregory Peterson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Tasmania, Bag 26, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
Interests: clinical pharmacy; medication safety; health informatics; health services research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adherence to medications and treatment recommendations is among the most effective ways of improving health outcomes. Yet, poor patient adherence is common, especially among people living with chronic illness. We invite you to submit manuscripts for this Special Issue which focuses on “Patient Adherence”. We welcome research which examines the assessment, prevalence and determinants of adherence, the consequences of poor adherence, and strategies which can be used to address intentional and/or unintentional poor adherence. We seek manuscripts of all types, including reviews, original research, short reports, case studies, and commentaries, and will also consider manuscripts which focus on adherence with other treatment modalities (e.g., dietary or exercise recommendations).

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Assoc. Prof. Judy Mullan
Prof. Gregory Peterson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Medication adherence
  • Polypharmacy
  • Comorbidity
  • Treatment adherence
  • Safe medicine management
  • Interventions to improve adherence

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Factors Associated with Medication Non-Adherence among Patients with Lifestyle-Related Non-Communicable Diseases
Pharmacy 2021, 9(2), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9020090 - 22 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1056
Abstract
This cross-sectional study explored the association between medication non-adherence and its factors in patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) using an online structured questionnaire emailed to 30,000 people (aged over 20 years who lived in Japan at the time of the survey). The questions [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study explored the association between medication non-adherence and its factors in patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) using an online structured questionnaire emailed to 30,000 people (aged over 20 years who lived in Japan at the time of the survey). The questions concerned respondents’ characteristics, medication non-adherence, health beliefs, lifestyles, and trouble taking medication. Factors related to non-adherence were analyzed among patients with lifestyle-related NCDs categorized into two age groups: 20–59, and >60 years. Unintentional (p < 0.001) and intentional (p < 0.001) non-adherence were more common among patients aged 20–59 than in older adults. NCD patients aged 20–59 experienced significantly more trouble taking medication than older adults. Multiple regression analysis showed that for patients aged 20–59 with NCDs, unintentional non-adherence was significantly and positively associated with current smoking habits (β = 0.280, p < 0.001), while intentional non-adherence was significantly and positively associated with alcohol consumption (β = 0.147, p = 0.020) and current smoking habits (β = 0.172, p = 0.007). In patients aged 20–59, unhealthy eating habits (β = −0.136, p = 0.034) and lack of exercise (β = −0.151, p = 0.020) were negatively associated with intentional non-adherence. In conclusion, factors affecting medication non-adherence in patients with lifestyle-related diseases are related to health awareness, lifestyle, and medication barriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
Article
Exploring Medication Adherence Using M-Health: A Study from Veterinary Medicine
Pharmacy 2020, 8(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010038 - 10 Mar 2020
Viewed by 1178
Abstract
Background: Pharmacy practice includes the handling of human and animal medication. Amongst veterinary pharmaceutical treatments, the management of Canine Atopic Dermatitis (CAD), a chronic skin condition affecting 10%–15% of the canine population, is complex and demanding. Medication regimens are tailored to each animal [...] Read more.
Background: Pharmacy practice includes the handling of human and animal medication. Amongst veterinary pharmaceutical treatments, the management of Canine Atopic Dermatitis (CAD), a chronic skin condition affecting 10%–15% of the canine population, is complex and demanding. Medication regimens are tailored to each animal and their owner or caregiver. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile health (m-health) application (Petable®) to support the medication adherence in CAD treatment and clinical improvement. Methods: A total of 30 atopic dogs under treatment for CAD and their caregivers were enrolled. Both the dogs’ and owners’ background data were recorded as well as clinical and medication adherence information. This was accomplished by direct observation, clinical files consultation, mobile application, and medication adherence (Medida de Adesão aos Tratamentos—MAT questionnaire) feedback. Results: The overall non-adherence of the sample was 12.6% according to the mobile application, while 60% of caregivers self-scored as adherent according to the MAT. The only significant and positive correlation was between overall adherence and the caregiver’s education. The average degree of pruritus decreased over time and during treatment, independently to the level of m-health app usage. Conclusions: The adherence to chronic treatments may be improved through m-health apps, although further studies are needed to gauge their actual usefulness in supplementing known adherence determinants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
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Article
Impact of Diabetes Perceptions on Medication Adherence in Japan
Pharmacy 2019, 7(4), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7040144 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1502
Abstract
Background: Patients’ perception of diabetes mellitus is one of the psychosocial factors influencing diabetic behavior. This patients’ perception of the disease is a mental image formed from the experience of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and reportedly reflects the aspect of [...] Read more.
Background: Patients’ perception of diabetes mellitus is one of the psychosocial factors influencing diabetic behavior. This patients’ perception of the disease is a mental image formed from the experience of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and reportedly reflects the aspect of recuperation. We investigated the relationship between changes in the patients’ perception of the disease and medication adherence, as influenced by the active involvement of community pharmacists. Methods: A prospective cohort study that used patient registry based in community pharmacies was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes using oral antidiabetic agents at a pharmacy in Ishikawa Prefecture in Japan. Patients responded to the questionnaire at the time of enrollment and at the end of the one-year intervention period. The pharmacist confirmed the patient's medication status and treatment problems via telephone calls at least once every two weeks for one year. Main outcome measures: Type 2 diabetes patients’ perception of the disease related to medication adherence. Results: The study enrolled 113 patients. Among the seven diabetes image factors, “Living an orderly life” and “Feeling of fear” were significantly associated with medication adherence. “Feeling of neglect of health” was significantly associated at the subscale level. Conclusion: All the three factors related to medication adherence indicated self-care ability. To enhance the self-care ability of the patient, pharmacists should assist in self-care interventions for the patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
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Review

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Review
The Consequences of General Medication Beliefs Measured by the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire on Medication Adherence: A Systematic Review
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030147 - 17 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1213
Abstract
(1) Background: Medication adherence is a key determinant of patient health outcomes in chronic illnesses. However, adherence to long-term therapy remains poor. General beliefs about medicine are considered factors influencing medication adherence. It is essential to address the gap in the literature regarding [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Medication adherence is a key determinant of patient health outcomes in chronic illnesses. However, adherence to long-term therapy remains poor. General beliefs about medicine are considered factors influencing medication adherence. It is essential to address the gap in the literature regarding understanding the impact of general beliefs about medicine on medication adherence to promote adherence in chronic illnesses. (2) Methods: PubMed, CINHAL, and EMBASE databases were searched. Studies were included if they examined medication beliefs using the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire in one of four chronic illnesses: hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and/or asthma. (3) Results: From 1799 articles obtained by the search, only 11 met the inclusion criteria. Hypertension and diabetes represented 91% of included studies, while asthma represented 9%. Higher medication adherence was associated with negative general medication beliefs; 65% of the included studies found a negative association between harm beliefs and adherence, while 30% of studies found a negative association with overuse beliefs. (4) Conclusions: This review evaluated the impact of harm and overuse beliefs about medicines on medication adherence, highlighting the gap in literature regarding the impact of harm and overuse beliefs on adherence. Further research is needed to fully identify the association between general beliefs and medication adherence in people with different cultural backgrounds, and to explore these beliefs in patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Healthcare providers need to be aware of the impact of patients’ cultural backgrounds on general medication beliefs and adherence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
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