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Article

Exploring Medication Adherence Using M-Health: A Study from Veterinary Medicine

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, 1649-003 Lisboa, Portugal
2
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Lisbon, 1300-477 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010038
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 26 February 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
Background: Pharmacy practice includes the handling of human and animal medication. Amongst veterinary pharmaceutical treatments, the management of Canine Atopic Dermatitis (CAD), a chronic skin condition affecting 10%–15% of the canine population, is complex and demanding. Medication regimens are tailored to each animal and their owner or caregiver. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile health (m-health) application (Petable®) to support the medication adherence in CAD treatment and clinical improvement. Methods: A total of 30 atopic dogs under treatment for CAD and their caregivers were enrolled. Both the dogs’ and owners’ background data were recorded as well as clinical and medication adherence information. This was accomplished by direct observation, clinical files consultation, mobile application, and medication adherence (Medida de Adesão aos Tratamentos—MAT questionnaire) feedback. Results: The overall non-adherence of the sample was 12.6% according to the mobile application, while 60% of caregivers self-scored as adherent according to the MAT. The only significant and positive correlation was between overall adherence and the caregiver’s education. The average degree of pruritus decreased over time and during treatment, independently to the level of m-health app usage. Conclusions: The adherence to chronic treatments may be improved through m-health apps, although further studies are needed to gauge their actual usefulness in supplementing known adherence determinants. View Full-Text
Keywords: medication adherence; canine atopic dermatitis; pruritus; veterinary pharmaceuticals; mobile health medication adherence; canine atopic dermatitis; pruritus; veterinary pharmaceuticals; mobile health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ribas, M.; Lourenço, A.M.; Cavaco, A. Exploring Medication Adherence Using M-Health: A Study from Veterinary Medicine. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 38. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010038

AMA Style

Ribas M, Lourenço AM, Cavaco A. Exploring Medication Adherence Using M-Health: A Study from Veterinary Medicine. Pharmacy. 2020; 8(1):38. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010038

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ribas, Marta, Ana M. Lourenço, and Afonso Cavaco. 2020. "Exploring Medication Adherence Using M-Health: A Study from Veterinary Medicine" Pharmacy 8, no. 1: 38. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010038

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