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Review

The Consequences of General Medication Beliefs Measured by the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire on Medication Adherence: A Systematic Review

1
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia
2
School of Science, Psychology and Sport, Federation University, Ballarat, VIC 3083, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030147
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 14 August 2020 / Published: 17 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
(1) Background: Medication adherence is a key determinant of patient health outcomes in chronic illnesses. However, adherence to long-term therapy remains poor. General beliefs about medicine are considered factors influencing medication adherence. It is essential to address the gap in the literature regarding understanding the impact of general beliefs about medicine on medication adherence to promote adherence in chronic illnesses. (2) Methods: PubMed, CINHAL, and EMBASE databases were searched. Studies were included if they examined medication beliefs using the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire in one of four chronic illnesses: hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and/or asthma. (3) Results: From 1799 articles obtained by the search, only 11 met the inclusion criteria. Hypertension and diabetes represented 91% of included studies, while asthma represented 9%. Higher medication adherence was associated with negative general medication beliefs; 65% of the included studies found a negative association between harm beliefs and adherence, while 30% of studies found a negative association with overuse beliefs. (4) Conclusions: This review evaluated the impact of harm and overuse beliefs about medicines on medication adherence, highlighting the gap in literature regarding the impact of harm and overuse beliefs on adherence. Further research is needed to fully identify the association between general beliefs and medication adherence in people with different cultural backgrounds, and to explore these beliefs in patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Healthcare providers need to be aware of the impact of patients’ cultural backgrounds on general medication beliefs and adherence. View Full-Text
Keywords: medication adherence; general beliefs about medicine; hypertension; diabetes mellitus; asthma; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease medication adherence; general beliefs about medicine; hypertension; diabetes mellitus; asthma; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shahin, W.; Kennedy, G.A.; Stupans, I. The Consequences of General Medication Beliefs Measured by the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire on Medication Adherence: A Systematic Review. Pharmacy 2020, 8, 147. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030147

AMA Style

Shahin W, Kennedy GA, Stupans I. The Consequences of General Medication Beliefs Measured by the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire on Medication Adherence: A Systematic Review. Pharmacy. 2020; 8(3):147. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030147

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shahin, Wejdan, Gerard A. Kennedy, and Ieva Stupans. 2020. "The Consequences of General Medication Beliefs Measured by the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire on Medication Adherence: A Systematic Review" Pharmacy 8, no. 3: 147. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030147

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