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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Diabetes Perceptions on Medication Adherence in Japan

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical, and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
2
Gran Pharma Inc., 1-5-2 Hon-machi, Kanazawa 920-0853, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2019, 7(4), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7040144
Received: 8 October 2019 / Revised: 21 October 2019 / Accepted: 27 October 2019 / Published: 29 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Adherence)
Background: Patients’ perception of diabetes mellitus is one of the psychosocial factors influencing diabetic behavior. This patients’ perception of the disease is a mental image formed from the experience of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and reportedly reflects the aspect of recuperation. We investigated the relationship between changes in the patients’ perception of the disease and medication adherence, as influenced by the active involvement of community pharmacists. Methods: A prospective cohort study that used patient registry based in community pharmacies was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes using oral antidiabetic agents at a pharmacy in Ishikawa Prefecture in Japan. Patients responded to the questionnaire at the time of enrollment and at the end of the one-year intervention period. The pharmacist confirmed the patient's medication status and treatment problems via telephone calls at least once every two weeks for one year. Main outcome measures: Type 2 diabetes patients’ perception of the disease related to medication adherence. Results: The study enrolled 113 patients. Among the seven diabetes image factors, “Living an orderly life” and “Feeling of fear” were significantly associated with medication adherence. “Feeling of neglect of health” was significantly associated at the subscale level. Conclusion: All the three factors related to medication adherence indicated self-care ability. To enhance the self-care ability of the patient, pharmacists should assist in self-care interventions for the patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: medication adherence; perception; community pharmacy services; diabetes mellitus; pharmaceutical care medication adherence; perception; community pharmacy services; diabetes mellitus; pharmaceutical care
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MDPI and ACS Style

Urata, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Horiuchi, R.; Fukui, K.; Arai, K. Impact of Diabetes Perceptions on Medication Adherence in Japan. Pharmacy 2019, 7, 144.

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