Special Issue "Electronic Prescribing and Other Innovative Information Technologies to Reduce Medication Errors"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yogini Jani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre for Medicines Optimisation Research and Education, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
2. School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK
Interests: medication safety; health informatics; human factors; behavioral and improvement science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electronic prescribing and other health information technologies, such as smart infusion devices, alerts and clinical decision support systems are advocated as strategies to reduce medication errors. The effectiveness of such systems is dependent on human–technology interaction. Pharmacists have a pivotal role in the design, configuration and deployment of these systems.
In this Special Issue of Pharmacy, we are seeking contributions from researchers from all over the world covering aspects such as the following:

  • The impact of health information technologies on medication errors
  • Challenges of implementation and adoption
  • Role of user-centred design
  • Human factors and behaviours

Contributions can be in the form of reviews or original research papers. We also welcome case studies and insightful commentaries. Welcome your submissions to this Special Issue “Electronic Prescribing and Other Innovative Information Technologies to Reduce Medication Errors”.

Dr. Yogini Jani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electronic prescribing
  • Medication errors
  • Smart infusion devices
  • Medication safety

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Longitudinal Assessment of the Quality of Insulin Prescribing with Different Prescribing Systems
Pharmacy 2021, 9(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9010053 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1162
Abstract
Accurate and complete prescriptions of insulin are crucial to prevent medication errors from occurring. Two core components for safe insulin prescriptions are the word ‘units’ being written in full for the dose, and clear documentation of the insulin device alongside the name. A [...] Read more.
Accurate and complete prescriptions of insulin are crucial to prevent medication errors from occurring. Two core components for safe insulin prescriptions are the word ‘units’ being written in full for the dose, and clear documentation of the insulin device alongside the name. A retrospective review of annual audit data was conducted for insulin prescriptions to assess the impact of changes to the prescribing system within a secondary care setting, at five time points over a period of 7 years (2014 to 2020). The review points were based on when changes were made, from standardized paper charts with a dedicated section for insulin prescribing, to a standalone hospital wide electronic prescribing and medicines administration (ePMA) system, and finally an integrated electronic health record system (EHRS). The measured outcomes were compliance with recommended standards for documentation of ‘units’ in full, and inclusion of the insulin device as part of the prescription. Overall, an improvement was seen in both outcomes of interest. Device documentation improved incrementally with each system change—34% for paper charts, 23%–56% for standalone ePMA, and 100% for ePMA integrated within EHRS. Findings highlight that differences in ePMA systems may have varying impact on safe prescribing practices. Full article
Article
An Evaluation of the Impact of Barcode Patient and Medication Scanning on Nursing Workflow at a UK Teaching Hospital
Pharmacy 2020, 8(3), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8030148 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2439
Abstract
Barcode medication administration (BCMA) is advocated as a technology that reduces medication errors relating to incorrect patient identity, drug or dose. Little is known, however, about the impact it has on nursing workflow. Our aim was to investigate the impact of BCMA on [...] Read more.
Barcode medication administration (BCMA) is advocated as a technology that reduces medication errors relating to incorrect patient identity, drug or dose. Little is known, however, about the impact it has on nursing workflow. Our aim was to investigate the impact of BCMA on nursing activity and workflow. A comparative study was conducted on two similar surgical wards within an acute UK hospital. We observed nurses during drug rounds on a non-BCMA ward and a BCMA ward. Data were collected on drug round duration, timeliness of medication administration, patient identification, medication verification and general workflow patterns. BCMA appears not to alter drug round duration, although it may reduce the administration time per dose. Workflow was more streamlined, with less use of the medicines room. The rate of patient identification increased from 74% (of 47) patients to 100% (of 43), with 95% of 255 scannable medication doses verified using the system. This study suggests that BCMA does not affect drug round duration; further research is required to determine the impact it has on timeliness of medication administration. There was reduced variability in the medication administration workflow of nurses, along with an increased patient identification rate and high medication scan rate, representing potential benefits to patient safety. Full article
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Review

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Review
Implementation of Smart Infusion Pumps: A Scoping Review and Case Study Discussion of the Evidence of the Role of the Pharmacist
Pharmacy 2020, 8(4), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8040239 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 778
Abstract
“Smart” infusion pumps include built in drug error reduction software which uses a drug library. Studies have reported the drug library build should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team, including a pharmacist; however, the extent or nature of the input required by the [...] Read more.
“Smart” infusion pumps include built in drug error reduction software which uses a drug library. Studies have reported the drug library build should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team, including a pharmacist; however, the extent or nature of the input required by the pharmacist for greatest benefit is unknown. This review aimed to identify key factors for the implementation of the smart infusion pumps, with a focus on the role of pharmacists and compare this to the experience from a case study. A literature review was conducted using Embase and Ovid Medline, and 13 eligible papers were found. Predominant themes relating to the pharmacist’s role and successful implementation of the smart infusion pumps were determined. Key factors for success included team involvement across the entire process from procurement, set-up through to implementation including risk assessment and device distribution, and training, which were comparable to the case study experience. Few studies described the extent or details of the pharmacist’s responsibilities. Full article
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