Special Issue "Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Viral Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2022) | Viewed by 6172

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rodolphe Hamel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MIVEGEC, Université de Montpellier, IRD, CNRS, Montpellier, France
Interests: arbovirus; viral tropical diseases; virus-host interactions and pathogenesis; One Health
Dr. Anon Srikiatkhachorn
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute for Immunology and Informatics, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, College of the Environment and Life Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA
Interests: arbovirus; viral hemorrhagic fevers; immune responses to viruses; virus-host interactions; pathogenesis of arbovirus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are a major concern in human and animal health. Among them, viruses transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, known as arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), represent a significant source of zoonotic diseases and a serious threat to public and animal health worldwide. Global changes, due to an increase in human activities that impact wildlife habitats, are promoting pathogen spillover from wildlife, the risk of the emergence of viruses, and their global dissemination. For instance, dengue virus incidence remains very high throughout tropical and subtropical areas and it is still spreading to new areas, while other viruses, such as yellow fever, West Nile, Usutu, Japanese encephalitis, and bluetongue, cause morbidity and mortality in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife worldwide.

However, the global spread of arboviruses is also due to their intrinsic characteristics that allow for the transmission, infection, and replication of these viruses in vertebrate hosts prior to the subsequent rounds of transmission and replication cycles. Changes in virus-derived non-structural protein-1 have been shown to enhance viral replication in mosquito vectors and facilitate transmission to mammalian hosts. Several viral proteins have been shown to interact with the host’s innate immune system to evade the detection of the virus and enhance viral replication. Further mutation in viral genomes has been linked to the emergence of novel clinical manifestations, such as the effects of intrauterine infection with Zika virus. A better understanding of virus–host interactions and molecular mechanisms remains crucial to elucidating the global pathogenesis of arboviruses, preventing their emergence, and addressing their impacts on human and animal health.

In this Special Issue, we aim to publish studies on virus–host and virus–vector interactions and the pathogenesis of arboviruses in humans and animals, including newly emerging arboviruses. Original research papers, review articles, and short communications are welcome.

Dr. Rodolphe Hamel
Dr. Anon Srikiatkhachorn
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arbovirus
  • virus-host interactions and viral replication
  • host immunity
  • host factors
  • vectors

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Acute-phase Serum Cytokine Levels and Correlation with Clinical Outcomes in Children and Adults with Primary and Secondary Dengue Virus Infection in Myanmar between 2017 and 2019
Pathogens 2022, 11(5), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050558 - 09 May 2022
Viewed by 543
Abstract
The dengue virus (DENV) has been endemic in Myanmar since 1970, causing outbreaks every 2–3 years. DENV infection symptoms range from mild fever to lethal hemorrhage. Clinical biomarkers must be identified to facilitate patient risk stratification in the early stages of infection. We [...] Read more.
The dengue virus (DENV) has been endemic in Myanmar since 1970, causing outbreaks every 2–3 years. DENV infection symptoms range from mild fever to lethal hemorrhage. Clinical biomarkers must be identified to facilitate patient risk stratification in the early stages of infection. We analyzed 45 cytokines and other factors in serum samples from the acute phase of DENV infection (within 3–5 days of symptom onset) from 167 patients in Yangon, Myanmar, between 2017 and 2019. All of the patients tested positive for serum DENV nonstructural protein 1 antigen (NS1 Ag); 78.4% and 62.9% were positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG), respectively; and 18.0%, 19.8%, and 11.9% tested positive for serotypes 1, 3, and 4, respectively. Although the DENV-4 viral load was significantly higher than those of DENV-1 or DENV-3, disease severity was not associated with viral load or serotype. Significant correlations were identified between disease severity and CCL5, SCF, PDGF-BB, IL-10, and TNF-α levels; between NS1 Ag and SCF, CCL5, IFN-α, IL-1α, and IL-22 levels; between thrombocytopenia and IL-2, TNF-α, VEGF-D, and IL-6 levels; and between primary or secondary infection and IL-2, IL-6, IL-31, IL-12p70, and MIP-1β levels. These circulating factors may represent leading signatures in acute DENV infections, reflecting the clinical outcomes in the dengue endemic region, Myanmar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Absence of Abdominal Pigmentation in Livestock Associated Culicoides following Artificial Blood Feeding and the Epidemiological Implication for Arbovirus Surveillance
Pathogens 2021, 10(12), 1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10121571 - 02 Dec 2021
Viewed by 894
Abstract
Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), the vectors of economically important arboviruses such as bluetongue virus and African horse sickness virus, are of global importance. In the absence of transovarial transmission, the parity rate of a Culicoides population provides imperative information regarding the risk of [...] Read more.
Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), the vectors of economically important arboviruses such as bluetongue virus and African horse sickness virus, are of global importance. In the absence of transovarial transmission, the parity rate of a Culicoides population provides imperative information regarding the risk of virus dispersal. Abdominal pigmentation, which develops after blood feeding and ovipositioning, is used as an indicator of parity in Culicoides. During oral susceptibility trials over the last three decades, a persistent proportion of blood engorged females did not develop pigment after incubation. The present study, combining a number of feeding trials and different artificial feeding methods, reports on this phenomenon, as observed in various South African and Italian Culicoides species and populations. The absence of pigmentation in artificial blood-fed females was found in at least 23 Culicoides species, including important vectors such as C. imicola, C. bolitinos, C. obsoletus, and C. scoticus. Viruses were repeatedly detected in these unpigmented females after incubation. Blood meal size seems to play a role and this phenomenon could be present in the field and requires consideration, especially regarding the detection of virus in apparent “nulliparous” females and the identification of overwintering mechanisms and seasonally free vector zones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Delineating the Role of Aedes aegypti ABC Transporter Gene Family during Mosquito Development and Arboviral Infection via Transcriptome Analyses
Pathogens 2021, 10(9), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091127 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1355
Abstract
Aedes aegypti acts as a vector for several arboviral diseases that impose a major socio-economic burden. Moreover, the absence of a vaccine against these diseases and drug resistance in mosquitoes necessitates the development of new control strategies for vector-borne diseases. ABC transporters that [...] Read more.
Aedes aegypti acts as a vector for several arboviral diseases that impose a major socio-economic burden. Moreover, the absence of a vaccine against these diseases and drug resistance in mosquitoes necessitates the development of new control strategies for vector-borne diseases. ABC transporters that play a vital role in immunity and other cellular processes in different organisms may act as non-canonical immune molecules against arboviruses, however, their role in mosquito immunity remains unexplored. This study comprehensively analyzed various genetic features of putative ABC transporters and classified them into A-H subfamilies based on their evolutionary relationships. Existing RNA-sequencing data analysis indicated higher expression of cytosolic ABC transporter genes (E & F Subfamily) throughout the mosquito development, while members of other subfamilies exhibited tissue and time-specific expression. Furthermore, comparative gene expression analysis from the microarray dataset of mosquito infected with dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses revealed 31 commonly expressed ABC transporters suggesting a potentially conserved transcriptomic signature of arboviral infection. Among these, only a few transporters of ABCA, ABCC and ABCF subfamily were upregulated, while most were downregulated. This indicates the possible involvement of ABC transporters in mosquito immunity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Zika Virus Potential Vectors among Aedes Mosquitoes from Hokkaido, Northern Japan: Implications for Potential Emergence of Zika Disease
Pathogens 2021, 10(8), 938; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080938 - 24 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1073
Abstract
The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a rapidly expanding mosquito-borne virus that causes febrile illness in humans. Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the primary ZIKV vectors; however, the potential vector competence of other Aedes mosquitoes distributed in northern Japan (Palearctic ecozone) are not [...] Read more.
The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a rapidly expanding mosquito-borne virus that causes febrile illness in humans. Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the primary ZIKV vectors; however, the potential vector competence of other Aedes mosquitoes distributed in northern Japan (Palearctic ecozone) are not yet known. In this study, the susceptibility to Zika virus infection of three Aedes mosquitoes distributed in the main city of the northern Japan and their capacities as vectors for ZIKV were evaluated. Field-collected mosquitoes were fed ad libitum an infectious blood meal containing the ZIKV PRVABC59. The Zika virus was detected in the abdomen of Ae. galloisi and Ae. japonicus at 2–10 days post infection (PI), and from the thorax and head of Ae. galloisi at 10 days PI, resulting in 17.6% and 5.9% infection rates, respectively. The Zika virus was not detected from Ae. punctor at any time. Some northern Japanese Aedes could be suspected as vectors of ZIKV but the risk may be low when compared with major ZIKV vectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
New Insights into the Biology of the Emerging Tembusu Virus
Pathogens 2021, 10(8), 1010; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10081010 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1510
Abstract
Reported for the first time in 1955 in Malaysia, Tembusu virus (TMUV) remained, for a long time, in the shadow of flaviviruses with human health importance such as dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. However, since 2010 and the first large epidemic in [...] Read more.
Reported for the first time in 1955 in Malaysia, Tembusu virus (TMUV) remained, for a long time, in the shadow of flaviviruses with human health importance such as dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. However, since 2010 and the first large epidemic in duck farms in China, the threat of its emergence on a large scale in Asia or even its spillover into the human population is becoming more and more significant. This review aims to report current knowledge on TMUV from viral particle organization to the development of specific vaccines and therapeutics, with a particular focus on host-virus interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Host Interactions and Pathogenesis of Arbovirus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop