Special Issue "Chlamydia trachomatis Infections"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John Papp
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory Scientific Advisor, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Director, Division of STD Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA
Interests: Sexually Transmitted Disease; Chlamydia and Gonorrhea
Dr. Elena Ambrosino
Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Institute of Public Health Genomics, Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Research Institute GROW, Faculty of Health, Medicine & Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Interests: International Public Health; Sexual/Reproductive Health; Infectious Diseases; Immunology; Health Education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that primarily infects human mucosal sites and may lead to serious sequelae such as reproductive infertility in women or blinding trachoma. . Globally, C trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted infection and is the leading cause of preventable blindness. The continued high prevalence and potential disease outcome from untreated infections underscore the need for aggressive public health interventions.

Tetracycline and macrolide antimicrobial agents are effective in the treatment of C. trachomatis but additional research is requited to better understand the pathogenesis to address ongoing high rates of transmission.

The molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of Chlamydial infections are not completely understood due to the difficulties in establishing reliable animal models and inability to genetically manipulate the organism to elucidate virulence mechanisms.

Overall, many important questions remain about the natural history of C. trachomatis infections, disease progression, epidemiology, and effective disease control strategies.

This Special issue is dedicated to C. trachomatis related pathology and epidemiology. Submissions from researchers investigating C. trachomatis infections and outcomes are welcome. The aim is to provide state-of-the art summaries of current knowledge and explore emerging developments in the understanding of the pathogen, the infection, or their global impact. We look forward to your contribution.

Dr. John Papp
Dr. Elena Ambrosino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Pathogenicity
  • Immunology & Immunogenetics
  • Prevention and Treatment
  • One Health
  • Diagnostics
  • Serology
  • Point of Care Testing
  • Clinical Outcomes
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health impact

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Sugars on Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040298 - 17 Apr 2020
Abstract
Background. Previous works suggest that sugars can have a beneficial effect on C. trachomatis (CT) survival and virulence. In this study, we investigated the effect of different sugars on CT infectivity, elucidating some of the molecular mechanisms behind CT-sugar interaction. Methods. CT infectivity [...] Read more.
Background. Previous works suggest that sugars can have a beneficial effect on C. trachomatis (CT) survival and virulence. In this study, we investigated the effect of different sugars on CT infectivity, elucidating some of the molecular mechanisms behind CT-sugar interaction. Methods. CT infectivity was investigated on HeLa cells after 2 hour-incubation of elementary bodies (EBs) with glucose, sucrose, or mannitol solutions (0.5, 2.5, 5.0 mM). The effect of sugars on EB membrane fluidity was investigated by fluorescence anisotropy measurement, whereas the changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure were examined by cytofluorimetric analysis. By means of a Western blot, we explored the phosphorylation state of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in HeLa cells infected with EBs pre-incubated with sugars. Results. All sugar solutions significantly increased CT infectivity on epithelial cells, acting directly on the EB structure. Sugars induced a significant increase of EB membrane fluidity, leading to changes in LPS membrane exposure. Especially after incubation with sucrose and mannitol, EBs led to a higher FAK phosphorylation, enhancing the activation of anti-apoptotic and proliferative signals in the host cells. Conclusions. Sugars can increase CT infectivity and virulence, by modulating the expression/exposure of chlamydial membrane ligands. Further in-depth studies are needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chlamydia trachomatis Infections)
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Open AccessArticle
The Prevalence of HSV, HHV-6, HPV and Mycoplasma genitalium in Chlamydia trachomatis positive and Chlamydia trachomatis Negative Urogenital Samples among Young Women in Finland
Pathogens 2019, 8(4), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8040276 - 01 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) cause sexually transmitted infections. In addition, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may be a genital co-pathogen. The prevalence rates of HSV, HHV-6, HPV, M. genitalium, and the C. trachomatis [...] Read more.
Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) cause sexually transmitted infections. In addition, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may be a genital co-pathogen. The prevalence rates of HSV, HHV-6, HPV, M. genitalium, and the C. trachomatis ompA genotypes were investigated by PCR in urogenital samples of the C. trachomatis nucleic acid amplification test positive (n = 157) and age-, community- and time-matched negative (n = 157) women. The prevalence of HPV DNA was significantly higher among the C. trachomatis positives than the C. trachomatis negatives (66% vs. 25%, p < 0.001). The prevalence of HSV (1.9% vs. 0%), HHV-6 (11% vs. 14%), and M. genitalium DNA (4.5% vs. 1.9%) was not significantly different between the C. trachomatis-positive and -negative women. Thirteen per cent of test-of-cure specimens tested positive for C. trachomatis. The prevalence of HSV, HHV-6, HPV, M. genitalium, and the C. trachomatis ompA genotypes did not significantly differ between those who cleared the C. trachomatis infection (n = 105) and those who did not (n = 16). The higher prevalence of HPV DNA among the C. trachomatis positives suggests greater sexual activity and increased risk for sexually transmitted pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chlamydia trachomatis Infections)
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