Special Issue "Advances in the Immunobiology of Parasitic Diseases"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunological Responses and Immune Defense Mechanisms".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luis I. Terrazas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Tlalnepantla 54090, Mexico
Interests: immunoregulation in parasitic diseases, mainly how helminths and the molecules they release may affect dendritic cell maturation as well as macrophage’s response to inflammatory stimulus; how these interactions between helminths and their molecules with the host may modify the immune response to other pathogens or inflammatory-mediated diseases (co-infections and co-morbidities)
Dr. Jorge Morales-Montor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Immunology, Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México, México City 04510, México
Interests: gender differences in host-parasite interactions; sex-associated susceptibility to parasitic diseases as well as environmental pollution and its impact on parasitic diseases
Dr. Derek M. McKay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
Interests: To advance knowledge on the regulation of intestinal epithelial biology; mucosal immunology (particularly macrophages) and to assess host-parasite interactions as a way to unravel new approaches to inflammatory disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Notwithstanding that today, most biomedical research is focused on the pandemic caused by the virus SARs-CoV-2, we still have in the world many diseases unresolved that are now almost forgotten. Thus, when this virus is finally under control, the other diseases caused by different pathogens will remain, causing the same health problems and even worse, due to inattention in the last one and a half year or maybe more.

Parasitic diseases have been deeply rooted in human evolution and will prevail for many years to come. Thus, it is critical that do not forget about the damage they cause to the people who are suffering from these infections. The only way to eradicate or control such parasitic diseases is to increase our knowledge on them.

Therefore, the goal of this Special Issue is to put together the recent findings achieved, despite the pandemic, by researchers interested in parasitic diseases.

This Special Issue invites either original research or review articles focused on, but not limited to, the following “hot topics” in parasitic research:

Immunomodulation on parasitic diseases, including protozoa and helminths;

Innate immunity to protozoa and helminths;

Cytokines/chemokines and susceptibility or resistance on parasitic diseases;

Co-infections;

Co-morbidities during parasitic infections, for good or bad?

Signaling pathways and susceptibility to parasites;

Vaccine development against parasites.

Dr. Luis I. Terrazas
Dr. Jorge Morales-Montor
Dr. Derek M. McKay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protozoa
  • helminths
  • cytokines
  • signaling pathways
  • co-infections
  • infections and co-morbidities
  • innate immunity
  • immunomodulation
  • immune checkpoints
  • vaccines

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Tamoxifen Suppresses the Immune Response to Plasmodium berghei ANKA and Exacerbates Symptomatology
Pathogens 2021, 10(6), 743; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10060743 - 12 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Malaria is the most lethal parasitic disease in the world. Mortality and severity in symptoms are higher in men than women, suggesting that oestrogens, which are in higher concentration in females than in males, may regulate the immune response against malaria. Tamoxifen, a [...] Read more.
Malaria is the most lethal parasitic disease in the world. Mortality and severity in symptoms are higher in men than women, suggesting that oestrogens, which are in higher concentration in females than in males, may regulate the immune response against malaria. Tamoxifen, a selective oestrogen receptor modulator used in breast cancer treatment due to its antagonistic effect on oestrogen receptors α and β, is also studied because of its potential therapeutic use for several parasitic diseases. However, most studies, including one in malaria, have not addressed the immunomodulatory role of tamoxifen. In this work, we evaluated the effect of tamoxifen on the immune response of CBA/Ca mice against Plasmodium berghei ANKA. This study showed for the first time that tamoxifen increased parasite load, aggravated symptoms by decreasing body temperature and body weight, and worsened anaemia. Additionally, tamoxifen significantly increased the splenic index and the percentages of CD4+ and NK+ cells on day eight post-infection. By contrast, tamoxifen decreased both CD8+ and B220+ populations in the spleen and decreased the serum levels of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. Our findings support the notion that tamoxifen is a potent immunomodulator in malaria-infected mice and suggest caution when administering it to malaria-infected women with breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Immunobiology of Parasitic Diseases)
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Review

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Review
Trichuris muris Model: Role in Understanding Intestinal Immune Response, Inflammation and Host Defense
Pathogens 2021, 10(8), 925; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080925 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 251
Abstract
Several parasites have evolved to survive in the human intestinal tract and over 1 billion people around the world, specifically in developing countries, are infected with enteric helminths. Trichuris trichiura is one of the world’s most common intestinal parasites that causes human parasitic [...] Read more.
Several parasites have evolved to survive in the human intestinal tract and over 1 billion people around the world, specifically in developing countries, are infected with enteric helminths. Trichuris trichiura is one of the world’s most common intestinal parasites that causes human parasitic infections. Trichuris muris, as an immunologically well-defined mouse model of T. trichiura, is extensively used to study different aspects of the innate and adaptive components of the immune system. Studies on T. muris model offer insights into understanding host immunity, since this parasite generates two distinct immune responses in resistant and susceptible strains of mouse. Apart from the immune cells, T. muris infection also influences various components of the intestinal tract, especially the gut microbiota, mucus layer, epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Here, we reviewed the different immune responses generated by innate and adaptive immune components during acute and chronic T. muris infections. Furthermore, we discussed the importance of studying T. muris model in understanding host–parasite interaction in the context of alteration in the host’s microbiota, intestinal barrier, inflammation, and host defense, and in parasite infection-mediated modulation of other immune and inflammatory diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Immunobiology of Parasitic Diseases)
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