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Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Prebiotics and Probiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 October 2024 | Viewed by 16049

Special Issue Editor

State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
Interests: prebiotics and probiotics; gut microbiota; nutrition; immunology; metabolic diseases; gut–brain axis; gastrointestinal diseases; endocrine disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microbial community structural and functional disorder (dysbiosis) has been linked to numerous diseases, including diabetes mellitus, obesity, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal disorders, mental disease, and cancer. The use of prebiotics or probiotic bacteria is a promising way to achieve disease prevention and treatment. The introduced probiotic strains pass through the digestive tract or accumulate at a specific site in the intestine, producing numerous metabolites, inhibiting pathogen colonization, regulating immunity, and together with prebiotics, positively modulating the balance of gut bacterial composition and its metabolites, thus, exerting beneficial effects. Through prebiotics or probiotic supplementation for preventing the disruption of microbial communities, they represent an alternative health regulation strategy. Studies have revealed, especially, that the consumption of prebiotics and probiotic supplementation, and the resulting improvement in gut microbiota dysbiosis, significantly improve the overall health of patients with diabetes and metabolic diseases. This Special Issue covers all aspects of using prebiotics and probiotics to treat diabetes and metabolism disorder in humans and model organisms (mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates). The goal of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for all researchers to better understand the importance of prebiotics and probiotics as therapeutic strategies for diabetes and metabolism disorder.

Kind regards,

Dr. Gang Wang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • diabetes
  • metabolism disorder
  • probiotics
  • prebiotics
  • gut microbiota
  • nutrition

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3227 KiB  
Article
Clostridium butyricum Strain CCFM1299 Reduces Obesity via Increasing Energy Expenditure and Modulating Host Bile Acid Metabolism
by Jingyi Liao, Yaoliang Liu, Ye Yao, Jie Zhang, Hongchao Wang, Jianxin Zhao, Wei Chen and Wenwei Lu
Nutrients 2023, 15(20), 4339; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15204339 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1242
Abstract
Clostridium butyricum is a butyrate-producing microorganism which has beneficial effects on various diseases, including obesity. In our previous study, the anti-obesity Clostridium butyricum strain CCFM1299 (C20_1_1) was selected, but its anti-obesity mechanism was not clarified. Herein, CCFM1299 was orally administrated to high-fat-diet-treated C57BL/6J [...] Read more.
Clostridium butyricum is a butyrate-producing microorganism which has beneficial effects on various diseases, including obesity. In our previous study, the anti-obesity Clostridium butyricum strain CCFM1299 (C20_1_1) was selected, but its anti-obesity mechanism was not clarified. Herein, CCFM1299 was orally administrated to high-fat-diet-treated C57BL/6J mice for 12 weeks to uncover the way the strain alleviates obesity. The results indicated that CCFM1299 alleviated obesity through increasing the energy expenditure and increasing the expression of genes related to thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Moreover, strain CCFM1299 could also affect the expression of immune-related genes in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). This immunomodulatory effect might be achieved through its influence on the complement system, as the expression of the complement factor D (CFD) gene decreased significantly. From the view of metabolites, CCFM1299 administration increased the levels of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in feces and taurohyodeoxycholic acid (THDCA) in serum. Together, the anti-obesity potential of CCFM1299 might be attributed to the increase in energy consumption, the regulation of immune-related gene expression in eWAT, and the alteration of bile acid metabolism in the host. These provided new insights into the potential application of anti-obesity microbial preparations and postbiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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14 pages, 5169 KiB  
Article
Protective Effects of Bacteriocin-Producing Lactiplantibacillus plantarum on Intestinal Barrier of Mice
by Yushan Bu, Yisuo Liu, Yinxue Liu, Jiayuan Cao, Zhe Zhang and Huaxi Yi
Nutrients 2023, 15(16), 3518; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15163518 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1416
Abstract
Bacteriocins are crucial metabolites of probiotics that display beneficial functions. The intestinal barrier is an important target on which probiotics exert their intestinal health activity. However, the impacts of bacteriocin-producing probiotics on the intestinal barrier are unclear. In this study, the effects of [...] Read more.
Bacteriocins are crucial metabolites of probiotics that display beneficial functions. The intestinal barrier is an important target on which probiotics exert their intestinal health activity. However, the impacts of bacteriocin-producing probiotics on the intestinal barrier are unclear. In this study, the effects of bacteriocin-producing Lactiplantibacillus plantarum Q7 and L. plantarum F3-2 on the intestinal barrier of mice were explored. It was shown that L. plantarum Q7 promoted the expression of mucin MUC2 to enhance the protection provided by the intestinal mucus layer. L. plantarum Q7 up-regulated the gene expression of intestinal tight junction proteins ZO-1 and JAM-1 significantly, and L. plantarum F3-2 up-regulated ZO-1 and Claudin-1 markedly, which exhibited tight junction intestinal barrier function. The two strains promoted the release of IgA and IgG at varying degrees. The antimicrobial peptide gene RegIIIγ was up-regulated markedly, and the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines appeared to exhibit an upward trend with L. plantarum Q7 treatment, so as to enhance intestinal immune regulation function. Furthermore, L. plantarum Q7 and L. plantarum F3-2 increased the abundance of the beneficial bacteria Muribaculaceae, inhibited the growth of the harmful bacteria Parabacteroides, and facilitated the synthesis of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which seemed to favor the prevention of metabolic diseases. Our results suggested that L. plantarum Q7 and L. plantarum F3-2 showed strain specificity in their protective effects on the intestinal chemical, physical, immunological and biological barriers of mice, which provided theoretical support for the selective utilization of bacteriocin-producing strains to regulate host health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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15 pages, 6523 KiB  
Article
Beneficial Effects of Indigenous Probiotics in High-Cholesterol Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemic Rats
by Narathip Puttarat, Anongnard Kasorn, Porntipha Vitheejongjaroen, Chantanapa Chantarangkul, Marut Tangwattanachuleeporn and Malai Taweechotipatr
Nutrients 2023, 15(12), 2710; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15122710 - 11 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2048
Abstract
Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. Probiotics are the essential constituents of the gastrointestinal microbiota that provide health-promoting effects. Cholesterol-lowering activity is a specific property of probiotics, improving the cholesterol metabolism without adverse effects. Thus, the purpose [...] Read more.
Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. Probiotics are the essential constituents of the gastrointestinal microbiota that provide health-promoting effects. Cholesterol-lowering activity is a specific property of probiotics, improving the cholesterol metabolism without adverse effects. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effect of single and mixed cholesterol-lowering probiotic strains (including Limosilactobacillus reuteri TF-7, Enterococcus faecium TF-18, and Bifidobacterium animalis TA-1) in high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced hypercholesterolemic rats. The results showed that the administration of single probiotics contributed to a reduction in the body weight gain, visceral organ indexes, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis and also an improvement in the gastrointestinal microbiota. Besides the effect of single cholesterol-lowering probiotics, three probiotics strains could also synergize their hypocholesterolemic effect when administered simultaneously. These findings indicate that three cholesterol-lowering probiotic strains are suitable for development as probiotic supplements to reduce the risk of diseases caused by cholesterol and exert health benefits with synergistic effect when administered simultaneously. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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22 pages, 12622 KiB  
Article
High Fructose Causes More Prominent Liver Steatohepatitis with Leaky Gut Similar to High Glucose Administration in Mice and Attenuation by Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1
by Thunnicha Ondee, Krit Pongpirul, Kanyarat Udompornpitak, Warumphon Sukkummee, Thanapat Lertmongkolaksorn, Sayamon Senaprom and Asada Leelahavanichkul
Nutrients 2023, 15(6), 1462; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15061462 - 17 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2519
Abstract
High-sugar diet-induced prediabetes and obesity are a global current problem that can be the result of glucose or fructose. However, a head-to-head comparison between both sugars on health impact is still lacking, and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 has never been tested, and has recently [...] Read more.
High-sugar diet-induced prediabetes and obesity are a global current problem that can be the result of glucose or fructose. However, a head-to-head comparison between both sugars on health impact is still lacking, and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 has never been tested, and has recently been isolated from healthy volunteers. The mice were administered with the high glucose or fructose preparation in standard mouse chaw with or without L. plantarum dfa1 gavage, on alternate days, and in vitro experiments were performed using enterocyte cell lines (Caco2) and hepatocytes (HepG2). After 12 weeks of experiments, both glucose and fructose induced a similar severity of obesity (weight gain, lipid profiles, and fat deposition at several sites) and prediabetes condition (fasting glucose, insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, and Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA score)). However, fructose administration induced more severe liver damage (serum alanine transaminase, liver weight, histology score, fat components, and oxidative stress) than the glucose group, while glucose caused more prominent intestinal permeability damage (FITC-dextran assay) and serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) compared to the fructose group. Interestingly, all of these parameters were attenuated by L. plantarum dfa1 administration. Because there was a subtle change in the analysis of the fecal microbiome of mice with glucose or fructose administration compared to control mice, the probiotics altered only some microbiome parameters (Chao1 and Lactobacilli abundance). For in vitro experiments, glucose induced more damage to high-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 µg/mL) to enterocytes (Caco2 cell) than fructose, as indicated by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), supernatant cytokines (TNF-α and IL-8), and glycolysis capacity (by extracellular flux analysis). Meanwhile, both glucose and fructose similarly facilitated LPS injury in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell) as evaluated by supernatant cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) and extracellular flux analysis. In conclusion, glucose possibly induced a more severe intestinal injury (perhaps due to LPS-glucose synergy) and fructose caused a more prominent liver injury (possibly due to liver fructose metabolism), despite a similar effect on obesity and prediabetes. Prevention of obesity and prediabetes with probiotics was encouraged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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17 pages, 3907 KiB  
Article
The Probiotic Combination of Lacticaseibacillus paracasei JY062 and Lactobacillus gasseri JM1 Alleviates Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder via Improving Gut Microbiota
by Shasha Cheng, Hongxuan Li, Yixin Ding, Jiacheng Huo, Yaping Zheng, Yujun Jiang, Yu Zhang and Chaoxin Man
Nutrients 2023, 15(4), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15040839 - 7 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2564
Abstract
Probiotics have received wide attention as a potential way to alleviate gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. Herein, we investigated the effects of Lacticaseibacillus paracasei JY062, Lactobacillus gasseri JM1, and the probiotic combination at 5 × 109 CFU/mL on mice induced by loperamide and [...] Read more.
Probiotics have received wide attention as a potential way to alleviate gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. Herein, we investigated the effects of Lacticaseibacillus paracasei JY062, Lactobacillus gasseri JM1, and the probiotic combination at 5 × 109 CFU/mL on mice induced by loperamide and explored the possible underlying mechanisms in GI motility disorder. After two weeks of probiotic intervention, the results indicated that the probiotic combination alleviated GI motility disorder better. It increased the secretion of excitatory GI regulators motilin, gastrin, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and decreased the secretion of the inhibitory GI regulators peptide YY and nitric oxide (NO), except vasoactive intestinal peptide. 5-HT and NO were related to the mRNA expression of 5-HT4 receptor and nitric oxide synthase, respectively. The intervention of probiotic combination also increased the number of interstitial cells of Cajal and the expression of SCF/c-kit protein. In addition, it also increased the abundance of beneficial bacteria (Lactobacillus, Rikenellaceae, and Clostridiaceae_Clostridium) and improved the contents of short-chain fatty acids in cecum contents of mice. In conclusion, the probiotic combination of L. paracasei JY062 and L. gasseri JM1 has the potential to alleviate GI motility disorders by balancing intestinal homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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14 pages, 3633 KiB  
Article
Oral Administration of Bovine Milk-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Attenuates Cartilage Degeneration via Modulating Gut Microbiota in DMM-Induced Mice
by Qiqi Liu, Haining Hao, Jiankun Li, Ting Zheng, Yukun Yao, Xiaoying Tian, Zhe Zhang and Huaxi Yi
Nutrients 2023, 15(3), 747; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15030747 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2116
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease primarily characterized by cartilage degeneration. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles (mEVs) were reported to inhibit catabolic and inflammatory processes in the cartilage of OA patients. However, the current therapies target the advanced symptoms of OA, and it [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease primarily characterized by cartilage degeneration. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles (mEVs) were reported to inhibit catabolic and inflammatory processes in the cartilage of OA patients. However, the current therapies target the advanced symptoms of OA, and it is significant to develop a novel strategy to inhibit the processes driving OA pathology. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of mEVs in alleviating OA in vivo. The results revealed that mEVs ameliorated cartilage degeneration by increasing hyaline cartilage thickness, decreasing histological Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores, enhancing matrix synthesis, and reducing the expression of cartilage destructive enzymes in the destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM) mice. In addition, the disturbed gut microbiota in DMM mice was partially improved upon treatment with mEVs. It was observed that the pro-inflammatory bacteria (Proteobacteria) were reduced and the potential beneficial bacteria (Firmicutes, Ruminococcaceae, Akkermansiaceae) were increased. mEVs could alleviate the progression of OA by restoring matrix homeostasis and reshaping the gut microbiota. These findings suggested that mEVs might be a potential therapeutic dietary supplement for the treatment of OA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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18 pages, 7476 KiB  
Article
Bifidobacterium adolescentis Is Effective in Relieving Type 2 Diabetes and May Be Related to Its Dominant Core Genome and Gut Microbiota Modulation Capacity
by Xin Qian, Qian Si, Guopeng Lin, Minmin Zhu, Jingyu Lu, Hao Zhang, Gang Wang and Wei Chen
Nutrients 2022, 14(12), 2479; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14122479 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3270
Abstract
The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing globally. Probiotics have been shown to be an effective intervention for diabetes. This study focused on the relieving effects and possible mechanisms of 16 strains of two dominant Bifidobacterium species (B. bifidum and B. adolescentis [...] Read more.
The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing globally. Probiotics have been shown to be an effective intervention for diabetes. This study focused on the relieving effects and possible mechanisms of 16 strains of two dominant Bifidobacterium species (B. bifidum and B. adolescentis, which exist in the human gut at different life stages) on type 2 diabetes (T2D). The results indicated that more B. adolescentis strains appeared to be superior in alleviating T2D symptoms than B. bifidum strains. This effect was closely related to the ability of B. adolescentis to restore the homeostasis of the gut microbiota, increase the abundance of short-chain fatty acid-producing flora, and alleviate inflammation in mice with T2D. In addition, compared with B. bifidum, B. adolescentis had a higher number of core genes, and these genes were more evolutionarily stable, including unique environmental tolerance, carbon and nitrogen utilization genes, and a blood sugar regulation gene, glgP. This may be one of the reasons why B. adolescentis is more likely to colonize in the adult gut and show a superior ability to relieve T2D. This study provides insights into future studies aimed at investigating probiotics for the treatment of metabolic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prebiotics and Probiotics in Metabolism Disorder)
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