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Special Issue "Nutrition and Hearing"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gregorio Varela-Moreiras

Professor of Nutrition and Food Science, CEU San Pablo University (Madrid, Spain)
President of the Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN)
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Dr. Teresa Partearroyo

Department of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, CEU San Pablo University, 28668 Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Homocysteine, folates, hearing loss, omega-3 fatty acids, nutrition and metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hearing loss (HL) has been recently ranked as the fifth leading cause of years lived with disability, higher than many other chronic diseases such as diabetes, dementia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moreover, according to the World Health Organization, the incidence of auditory disorders is increasing at an alarming rate without concern and perception by society and public health officials. HL has a multifactorial aetiology with genetic and environmental factors such as noise, ototoxic substances, and nutritional status involved. There is a strong need for a deepening of our knowledge of the existence of interrelations between these factors, as a first step towards the prevention and potential repair of hearing damage before it becomes irreversible.

Recent advances in animal studies that have allowed us to accurately elucidate the onset and progression of HL are closely linked to the availability of nutrients and their metabolism. This Special Issue of Nutrients is intended to highlight some of the recent dietary and nutritional studies and, more globally, life style studies, by utilizing experimental models or humans studies, and should review all aspects concerning the biological and biochemical mechanisms of HL and, more globally, etiology and causality, in order to ameliorate the therapeutic approaches in HL. Therefore, this issue welcomes the submission of manuscripts, either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature on this topic.

Prof. Dr. Gregorio Varela-Moreiras
Dr. Teresa Partearroyo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hearing loss
  • nutrition
  • metabolism
  • age-related hearing loss

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Associations of Dietary Riboflavin, Niacin, and Retinol with Age-related Hearing Loss: An Analysis of Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040896
Received: 30 March 2019 / Revised: 14 April 2019 / Accepted: 18 April 2019 / Published: 21 April 2019
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Abstract
Because age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is irreversible, prevention is very important. Thus, investigating modifying factors that help prevent ARHL is critical for the elderly. Nutritional status or nutritional factors for the elderly are known to be associated with many problems related to aging. [...] Read more.
Because age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is irreversible, prevention is very important. Thus, investigating modifying factors that help prevent ARHL is critical for the elderly. Nutritional status or nutritional factors for the elderly are known to be associated with many problems related to aging. Emerging studies suggest that there was the interaction between nutrition and ARHL. We aimed to investigate the possible impact of dietary nutrients on ARHL using data from the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) which included 4742 subjects aged ≥ 65 years from 2010 to 2012. All participants underwent an otologic examination, audiologic evaluation, and nutritional survey. The associations between ARHL and nutrient intake were analyzed using simple and multiple regression models with complex sampling adjusted for confounding factors, such as BMI, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and history of hypertension and diabetes. Higher intake groups of riboflavin, niacin and retinol was inversely associated with ARHL prevalence (riboflavin aOR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54–0.94; p = 0.016, niacin aOR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54–0.96; p = 0.025, retinol aOR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.51–0.86; p = 0.002, respectively). Our findings suggest the recommended intake levels of riboflavin, niacin, and retinol may help reduce ARHL in the elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Hearing)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Association of Nutritional Factors with Hearing Loss
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 307; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020307
Received: 17 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (300 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health problem. Nutritional factors can affect a variety of diseases, such as HL, in humans. Thus far, several studies have evaluated the association between nutrition and hearing. These studies found that the incidence of HL was [...] Read more.
Hearing loss (HL) is a major public health problem. Nutritional factors can affect a variety of diseases, such as HL, in humans. Thus far, several studies have evaluated the association between nutrition and hearing. These studies found that the incidence of HL was increased with the lack of single micro-nutrients such as vitamins A, B, C, D and E, and zinc, magnesium, selenium, iron and iodine. Higher carbohydrate, fat, and cholesterol intake, or lower protein intake, by individuals corresponded to poorer hearing status. However, higher consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids corresponded to better hearing status of studied subjects. In addition to malnutrition, obesity was reported as a risk factor for HL. In studies of the relationship between middle ear infection and nutrition in children, it was reported that lack of vitamins A, C and E, and zinc and iron, resulted in poorer healing status due to vulnerability to infection. These studies indicate that various nutritional factors can affect hearing. Therefore, considering that multifactorial nutritional causes are responsible, in part, for HL, provision of proper guidelines for maintaining a proper nutritional status is expected to prevent some of the causes and burden of HL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Hearing)
Open AccessReview
Interplay between Nutrition and Hearing Loss: State of Art
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010035
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
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Abstract
Hearing loss has been recently ranked as the fifth leading cause of years lived with disability, ahead of many other chronic diseases such as diabetes, dementia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moreover, according to the World Health Organization, moderate-to-profound hearing loss affects about [...] Read more.
Hearing loss has been recently ranked as the fifth leading cause of years lived with disability, ahead of many other chronic diseases such as diabetes, dementia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moreover, according to the World Health Organization, moderate-to-profound hearing loss affects about 466 million people worldwide. Its incidence varies in each population segment, affecting approximately 10% of children and increasing to 30% of the population over 65 years. However, hearing loss receives still very limited research funding and public awareness. This sensory impairment is caused by genetic and environmental factors, and among the latter, the nutritional status has acquired relevance due its association to hearing loss detected in recent epidemiological studies. Several experimental models have proved that the onset and progression of hearing loss are closely linked to the availability of nutrients and their metabolism. Here, we have reviewed studies focused on nutrient effects on auditory function. These studies support the potential of nutritional therapy for the protection against hearing loss progression, which is especially relevant to the aging process and related quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Hearing)
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