Special Issue "Nutrition Intervention on Digestive Diseases"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2022 | Viewed by 802

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hassan Ashktorab
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology and Cancer Center, College of Medicine, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC 20059, USA
Interests: colon carcinogenesis; Herbal medicine; molecular nutrition; Saffron (Crocus sativus); IBD; ulcerative colitis; Omics; adjuvant therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition and digestive function are closely interrelated. During digestion, the digestive tract breaks down food into nutrients and absorbs these nutrients for energy, growth, and cell repair. Therefore, digestive diseases (DDs) commonly result in malnutrition and increase morbidity, and even mortality. On the other hand, chronic malnutrition impairs digestive and absorption function to induce disease.

Bad eating habits or specific nutrients can trigger DDs, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease, and Crohn’s disease. Meanwhile, some nutrients or dietary supplements such as dietary fiber, short-chain fatty acids, fish oil, micronutrients, prebiotics, or probiotics may prevent DDs and benefit gut health.

This Special Issue aims to collect high-quality research concerning the influence of diet and nutrition on digestive diseases and disorders. Submissions focused on underrepresented populations are welcome: reports of original research (longitudinal studies, health promotion intervention studies, qualitative research, epidemiology, omics including genomics) or reviews (systematic reviews, meta-analyses).

Prof. Dr. Hassan Ashktorab
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition
  • digestive diseases
  • dietary fiber
  • short-chain fatty acids
  • prebiotic
  • probiotics
  • gut health
  • irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • inflamamtory bowel disease (IBD)
  • celiac disease
  • corhn’s disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Jump to: Other

Review
A Low-FODMAP Diet Provides Benefits for Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms but Not for Improving Stool Consistency and Mucosal Inflammation in IBD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2072; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102072 - 15 May 2022
Viewed by 197
Abstract
Background: A low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols diet (LFD) is claimed to improve functional gastrointestinal symptoms (FGSs). However, the role of LFD in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with FGSs remains unclear. Objective: To systematically assess the efficacy of LFD in [...] Read more.
Background: A low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols diet (LFD) is claimed to improve functional gastrointestinal symptoms (FGSs). However, the role of LFD in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with FGSs remains unclear. Objective: To systematically assess the efficacy of LFD in IBD patients with FGSs. Methods: Six databases were searched from inception to 1 January 2022. Data were synthesized as the relative risk of symptoms improvement and normal stool consistency, mean difference of Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS), Short IBD Questionnaire (SIBDQ), IBS Quality of Life (IBS-QoL), Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBi), Mayo score, and fecal calprotectin (FC). Risk of bias was assessed based on study types. A funnel plot and Egger’s test were used to analyze publication bias. Results: This review screened and included nine eligible studies, including four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and five before–after studies, involving a total of 446 participants (351 patients with LFD vs. 95 controls). LFD alleviated overall FGSs (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.33–0.66, p = 0.0000) and obtained higher SIBDQ scores (MD = 11.24, 95% CI 6.61 to 15.87, p = 0.0000) and lower HBi score of Crohn’s disease (MD = −1.09, 95% CI −1.77 to −0.42, p = 0.002). However, there were no statistically significant differences in normal stool consistency, BSFS, IBS-QoL, Mayo score of ulcerative colitis, and FC. No publication bias was found. Conclusions: LFD provides a benefit in FGSs and QoL but not for improving stool consistency and mucosal inflammation in IBD patients. Further well-designed RCTs are needed to develop the optimal LFD strategy for IBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention on Digestive Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Review

Systematic Review
Exclusion Diets in Functional Dyspepsia
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2057; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102057 - 14 May 2022
Viewed by 299
Abstract
Functional dyspepsia represents one of the most common and prevalent disorders of the brain–gut interaction, with a large number of widespread risk factors being identified. With an intricate pathogenesis and symptomatology, it heavily impacts the quality of life and, due to the limited [...] Read more.
Functional dyspepsia represents one of the most common and prevalent disorders of the brain–gut interaction, with a large number of widespread risk factors being identified. With an intricate pathogenesis and symptomatology, it heavily impacts the quality of life and, due to the limited efficacy of traditional pharmacological agents, patients are likely to seek other medical and non-medical solutions to their problem. Over the last few years, significant research in this domain has emphasized the importance of various psychological therapies and nutritional recommendations. Nevertheless, a correlation has been established between functional dyspepsia and food intolerances, with more and more patients adopting different kinds of exclusion diets, leading to weight loss, restrictive eating behaviour and an imbalanced nutritional state, further negatively impacting their quality of life. Thus, in this systematic review, we aimed at analysing the impact and efficiency of certain exclusion diets undertook by patients, more precisely, the gluten-free diet and the low-FODMAP diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention on Digestive Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop